Chip Freeney

Chip Freeney

Sr. UX Designer at The Home Depot Joined over 8 years ago

  • 1 story
  • 8 comments
  • 10 upvotes
  • Posted to Ask DN: How do you get/give critique in your design process? - 2min Survey, in reply to Bryce Howitson , Sep 24, 2016

    Glad to help! (wife is a UX researcher - we're all about the open-ended questions haha)

    A note on our critique process - the obvious value add is for the designer being critiqued. The undervalued (sometimes overlooked) aspect is the learning that critiquers get from listening to each other's comments. I learned so much in my early career by sitting in critique sessions and listening to the comments that seniors and leads were making. Helped train my eye, and gave me new perspectives.

    If you're building a platform, I would definitely consider how to promote this kind of value for the participants.

    Best of luck

    1 point
  • Posted to Ask DN: How do you get/give critique in your design process? - 2min Survey, Sep 23, 2016

    I love that y'all are doing this. I've actually thought about the 'critique as a service' idea also - could be really valuable, especially to designers without a team.

    (Now for some critique) I think you are missing out on data the way your survey is worded. As a survey taker, I was hoping for an opportunity to explain my team's process and why I love it. I would recommend adding an open text box with 'describe your critique process'.

    Cheers

    2 points
  • Posted to Dudes in Startup Shirts, Oct 24, 2014

    This is making our hipchat very fun. Thank you

    0 points
  • Posted to Software/Web developer portfolio examples?, in reply to Cihad Turhan , Sep 30, 2014

    Good stuff. Thanks

    0 points
  • Posted to Software/Web developer portfolio examples?, in reply to Matthew Ström , Sep 29, 2014

    My github activity is 100% private repos (between work and side projects)

    Any advice? What are some good open-source projects I could contribute to?

    Meanwhile, my codepen portfolio is overflowing. Does anyone look at that?

    2 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: How to shift from agency work to Product Design?, Sep 19, 2014

    As a designer on a product team, you will spend a lot less time in your design tools (adobe, sketch, whatever), and more time in product meetings, developer scrums, user research sessions, and Google Analytics. Did I say analytics?

    I'd say 90% of artifacts/materials that I produce are sketches and wireframes. I sometimes don't even produce high-fidelity docs to get a feature out the door, because we have a front-end framework in place (similar to bootstrap or foundation, but in-house custom) and developers don't have to worry about how tall the button is, or what color the fonts are, etc. I just hand them a wireframe and they know what to do. That trust and teamwork develops over time. I digress.

    Your code skills will come in handy. Use them to speak intelligently with the development team, earning their trust and respect. In my experience, your ability to work with others will be equally as valuable as your 'design' skills.

    Its been said already in this thread, but in the product world:

    Pretty =! Successful

    1 point
  • Posted to Format.com - finally live. A long journey for 4ormat online portfolio platform., Jul 07, 2014

    Looks great!

    Not gonna lie, I went through the "get started" process until it got to the registration. Then I dropped off.

    If I were you, I would delay the registration wall. Take me to my page, let me drag in photos and customize, get me invested and confident in the product, then at the "publish" step, ask me to register.

    I would A/B test this functionality and see what it does to your registration numbers.

    Again, great work. Looks beautiful.

    4 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: What desk do you have?, Jul 01, 2014

    Ikea Linnmon 78" long tabletop http://www.ikea.com/ca/en/catalog/products/S49001965/

    with Ikea GERTON 42" (adjustable) legs http://www.ikea.com/ca/en/catalog/products/60261626/

    Great standing desk for <$200. Can't raise/lower it on command like some of the fancy ones, but I could adjust the legs manually if I ever move or want to repurpose the table.

    0 points
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