G Lukacs

Joined over 2 years ago

  • 0 stories
  • 15 comments
  • 2 upvotes
  • Posted to The Burnout List, Jan 23, 2020

    The Burnout Society is an excellent read, I'd recommend Han's writing to anyone/everyone. Apologies for the naked quote, but gives a good overview:

    Much of Han's writing is characterised by an underlying concern with the situation encountered by human subjects in the fast-paced, technologically-driven state of late capitalism. The situation is explored in its various facets through his books: sexuality, mental health (particularly burnout, depression, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), violence, freedom, technology, and popular culture.

    In The Burnout Society (original German title: Müdigkeitsgesellschaft), Han characterizes today's society as a pathological landscape of neuronal disorders such as depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and burnout. He claims that they are not “infections” but “infarcts”, which are not caused by the negativity of people's immunology, but by an excess of positivity. According to Han, driven by the demand to persevere and not to fail, as well as by the ambition of efficiency, we become committers and sacrificers at the same time and enter a swirl of demarcation, self-exploitation, and collapse.

    “When production is immaterial, everyone already owns the means of production him- or herself. The neoliberal system is no longer a class system in the proper sense. It does not consist of classes that display mutual antagonism. This is what accounts for the system's stability.”

    Han argues that subjects become self-exploiters:

    “Today, everyone is an auto-exploiting labourer in his or her own enterprise. People are now master and slave in one. Even class struggle has transformed into an inner struggle against oneself.”

    The individual has become what Han calls “the achievement-subject”; the individual does not believe they are subjugated subjects but instead projects.

    “We are always refashioning and reinventing ourselves” which “amounts to a form of compulsion and constraint - indeed, to a more efficient kind of subjectivation and subjugation. As a project deeming itself free of external and alien limitations, the I is now subjugating itself to internal limitations and self-constraints, which are taking the form of compulsive achievement and optimization."

    Link below is a LibGen mirror.

    The Burnout Society [PDF]

    3 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: How do you manage UX copy and translations in your company?, Apr 04, 2019

    Started using Contentful for our marketing website, and thinking about using it for our application moving forward. Too early to say anything for sure, but I find the API really simple to use. I'm sure they have a feature to help with translations too. In my experience, using a native, first-language speaker to directly translate the passage(s) works out best. They tend to know the little idiosyncrasies/ins-and-outs of their language better than any service or algorithm could hope to.

    Transifex looks interesting too, but can't say that I've worked on a project that needs a translation solution at that scale.

    Best of luck!

    2 points
  • Posted to Slack new logo!, Jan 17, 2019

    Quick 2¢:

    I mean, I don't hate it. I don't really like it either though. Feels a lot more generic. Not sure it achieves the "more instantly recognizable" thing they're looking for.

    The post suggests that without consistency, a brand is unrecognisable, but I don't think I ever had any trouble identifying that something was "made by Slack". They use old landing page illustrations to show how things have become "inconsistent", but I haven't seen those landing pages in ~18 months, so why would they influence the way I see the brand now? It feels like they're trying to justify the changes to a design lecturer by creating this false narrative that "nobody understands when something is made by Slack, because the colours are different sometimes". Right, okay.

    I mean, if Slack is all about "hearing different voices", then surely different interpretations of the hash mark is your brand? Different points of view that see the brand in different ways, but with one common thing that binds them all together, the hash mark. Surely that's the whole point? To celebrate difference within the same. Why would a top-down, enforced design system represent the diversity of the people that use Slack better than, you know, the many different interpretations of the brand created by the many different perspectives that actually make up their user base? Surely you can fashion these different perspectives into something more conceptually strong than another top-down design system that will inevitably fail to enforce compliance. The hash is everywhere, and it's the thing people think about when they think "Slack". Is it really worth sacrificing that deep-seated recognition at the altar of consistency?

    If anything, it just seems like a missed opportunity to involve the community in the decision making process (and to reinforce core brand values, that people's voices come first, that discussion is important, and so on). "We really care about hearing what you have to say, so we decided to give the community some options to choose from." It just seems like an obvious home run.

    It does work well on different colours, and some of the applications are really nice, but I think it's a stretch to think that people see that logo and go "Oh yes, that's definitely speech bubbles coming from different directions, which is what Slack is all about". The hash felt very.. iconic, and it's everywhere in the application. I just feel like there was an immediate, obvious connection that now feels lost in the shuffle.

    10 points
  • Posted to Design Portfolio Bingo, in reply to Joe C , Oct 26, 2018

    I think you have to look at who the post aims at. It could be considered light-hearted, but it's not usually funny to "poke down".

    For me, this comes across as a relatively senior designer making fun of newer, less experienced people. Also, bear in mind that the person who posted this could have easily included some "redundant" features of her own portfolio, like "letters in logo reversed for no reason", or given that her matrix has a square labeled "also has a photography section", she could have maybe referenced the fact that she feels compelled to tell everyone that she "likes camping, volunteering and museums."

    I don't know, I don't mind personally. I'm not one for getting upset at things people say on the internet. But it seems to me that her post is lacking some of the "self-deprecating" stuff that makes most humour palatable.

    With regard to what you said before:

    "I have a few of the squares on my portfolio and it kind of hurt and made me feel ashamed."

    That is shit. I'm sorry. Don't be disheartened though, there are thousands of successful design people who have some of these squares in their portfolio. Remember, design ≠ art. A portfolio site, by its very nature, is an advertisement. I think people in the design community make this mistake often. Are we trying to impress other designers, or people that might hire us? Are those two things the same?

    We hold the most "creative" people up high, but then criticise young designers for making "usability mistakes". Which one is it? Creativity or adhering to shared standards? I don't want to get into this too deep, but you get the idea. The person who made this post is criticising designers for a perceived "lack of creativity" but at the same time, would be immediately prepared to criticise a portfolio that is "too creative" for not adhering to the standards we share.

    I think the design community loves to criticise. They'll say go left. Then you might go left. Next thing you know, they're saying you've gone too far left. This is because design people have a built-in compulsion to look for ways to improve things, but that's another story for another post. They mean well. Remember that.

    Here's the thing. You aren't always trying to impress jaded designers. Sometimes it's CEOs, CTOs, HR people, recruiters, whomever. It's more important to be a person that people want to be around. An articulate, friendly, helpful person. That will get you more work than any portfolio could. Your post seems to indicate that you're a thoughtful person. Don't worry about it too much.

    Her post is what it is, a quick, low-effort, ultimately harmless, bit of fun. If you're choosing to look at it as more than that, then I'd probably suggest not doing that!

    Hope you're doing well.

    5 points
  • Posted to Helen Tran — Product Designer, in reply to Martin Velchevski , Nov 15, 2017

    Scrolled 3 screens not reaching any block showcasing work or skills overview.

    "Most recently, I was at Shopify for four years, the last two of which I spent as a Design Lead helping build out a team of 30 designers. While I was there, I taught design through Bloc part-time, spent a year publishing weekly articles about design and leadership, and was featured in several interviews and podcasts."

    How is this not an overview of her work and skills? This is literally the first thing I saw after the video!

    There was a disconnect between what I expect to see from a product designer's portfolio and what I experienced.

    Okay, so your expectations are the standard by which we should judge the quality of someone's work, not how suitable it is for purpose (i.e. communicating with people in management positions, who are looking to hire people like Helen...)

    Please let's not turn DN into "someone is wrong on the internet" meme.

    Right, so you're allowed to fire off lazy criticism, but I'm not allowed to respond to it?

    It's funny that, as soon as your opinion is challenged, you become bothered about the standard of discourse on DN.

    Not to mention, you didn't care about the standard of discourse on DN when you throw out a lazy comment about a talented designer's website resembling a "dating profile".

    What you really want, is an echo chamber to ramble about things you (categorically) do not understand, and for nobody to disagree with you, or say something that might hurt your feelings.

    If I go to a meeting with a client wearing a t-shirt of my own face and spend the first 5 minutes showing him where I've been for the past years, he'll probably be a bit put taken aback at first.

    She's not doing that at all, and you know it.

    No need to dig deep into my psychological triggers.

    No need to admit you're even slightly wrong, either.

    7 points
  • Posted to Helen Tran — Product Designer, in reply to Martin Velchevski , Nov 14, 2017

    "If it was a white man in oxford shirt and rounded glasses I would have said exactly the same."

    And yet, conveniently, you didn't feel the need to join in on the criticism of (I assume this site?). None of your previous comments, actually, criticise anyone else's work.

    And yet, for some reason, you felt compelled to say what you said in this situation. Why is that?

    Not to mention, you conveniently ignored my question:

    I honestly don't understand how you can possibly (having actually read the case studies on her website), level the criticism of her being "too self involved". She literally builds systems to help design interns, teaches design courses in her spare time, makes a bunch of podcasts, etc. and here you are, criticising the intro paragraph of her website because.....

    Please, explain the thought process to me, because all that seems to come across in your comments is that you're intimidated by her appearance and self confidence. Nothing more, nothing less.

    So tell me, why is she a vain person? Why does her portfolio look like a "well designed dating profile"? How is someone "self-involved" if their work literally involves helping design people learn more and have better experiences working at a big company like Shopify?

    I apologise for having an accusatory tone (and perhaps for assuming the worst). Granted, your original comment wasn't some sort of hurtful tirade. I just think it lacks a certain coherence, given that you're criticising her for something that, if you took a second to read her writing, you wouldn't believe.

    9 points
  • Posted to Helen Tran — Product Designer, in reply to Rhys Merritt , Nov 14, 2017

    "Martin has constructively criticised what they see as an overuse of personal imagery - what is so out of line with that?"

    The way he said it, and what that reveals about the criticism he leveled. I'm sure the dating profile comment wouldn't be needed for a chubby bloke named Harry? What about the vanity comment?

    I knew someone would come up with the old "defending her honour" claim. For me, there's a difference between defending someone and attacking shitty criticism. Like you said, I'm sure Helen can take care of herself just fine.

    4 points
  • Posted to Helen Tran — Product Designer, in reply to Martin Velchevski , Nov 14, 2017

    Lol.

    "feels like a really well-designed dating profile."

    Would you have said that if it was a smart white man in an oxford shirt and rounded glasses?

    See, that's the thing, you people don't even try to conceal the blatant sexism in your critique. As soon as someone calls you out on it, all of a sudden "It's just my opinion!" and you conveniently get to abdicate responsibility for what you say and think.

    Yes, you're right. It is your opinion. But you voiced it in a really demeaning/condescending way, so either figure something else out, or think about keeping it to yourself. Beautiful women can be incredibly talented and smart designers, or models, or whatever they fucking want to be.

    I honestly don't understand how you can possibly (having actually read the case studies on her website), level the criticism of her being "too self involved". She literally builds systems to help design interns, teaches design courses in her spare time, makes a bunch of podcasts, etc. and here you are, criticising the intro paragraph of her website because.....

    Please, explain the thought process to me, because all that seems to come across in your comments is that you're intimidated by her appearance and self confidence. Nothing more, nothing less.

    25 points
  • Posted to Helen Tran — Product Designer, Nov 14, 2017

    +1

    3 points
  • Posted to Helen Tran — Product Designer, in reply to Gamby Lamb , Nov 14, 2017

    Yawn.

    0 points
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