Luke Mitchell

Luke Mitchell

Designer at thoughtbot Joined over 5 years ago

  • 5 stories
  • 43 comments
  • 46 upvotes
  • Posted to Variable Scroll Speed Websites, May 20, 2016

    I think it's a technique called 'Parallax scrolling' it's quite a popular technique for landing pages these days. You'll probably find multiple examples on the front of http://www.awwwards.com/ most of the time.

    0 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: Why are some typefaces so expensive?, May 17, 2016

    As far as I know many typefaces involve many months if not years of work to complete. Including extensive research, redesigns and optimisation. So it's understandable that they are offered at a premium – how much of premium? it's all down to the reasons above as well as how the designer values the finished product. Much like many other products for sale.

    1 point
  • Posted to Site Design: Philipp Antoni (Designer @ Stripe, previously Office for iPad and Mac), in reply to Neil Pullman , Jul 14, 2015

    I see, I didn't spot that. Thanks.

    0 points
  • Posted to Site Design: Philipp Antoni (Designer @ Stripe, previously Office for iPad and Mac), Jul 14, 2015

    This is really interesting. It's randomly generated on page load. Does anyone know how this is done? I'm guessing serve-side as there JS or any signs of anything funky going on.

    It's really refreshing to see a personal site that takes a risk for once, not your standard 'rectangles on white, with blog' recipe.

    2 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: What would you want to see in an RSVP web app/app?, in reply to Lewis Healey , May 27, 2015

    That would probably help quite a bit. Using the the guests as a 'checklist' seems like a better solution than having all the guests forms on one page (what I did).

    No problem, good luck with it.

    0 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: What would you want to see in an RSVP web app/app?, May 26, 2015

    Funnily enough I've just built a RSVP site for myself (and my future wife). Some things I've found out:

    I went for a system that does not require a guest to have a login (i.e. username & password) we thought this would be too cumbersome. Instead I had the app generate a random 4-digit code that can be printed (or written) on invites. The guest can then edit their invite with a simple code – from the homepage.

    It is super useful to have some kind of export. My app exports all guests to .CSV files. We are taking meal choices as well as attendance and the caterers are pretty particular about having an up-to-date list of meals and dietary requirements.

    In terms of design the homepage should contain everything a guest would want to know about the day. Timings, locations, nearby hotels, can I park? Gifts? all that stuff...

    I had some trouble in terms of UX. Due to the way my app works each guest has to press a submit button after filling their choices, which has been missed by some, instead continuing onto the next guest meaning the first was lost! If I did this project again I would have a 'step-by-step' UX that meant it was impossible to miss people off. Essentially one form per page! You can never guess the strange things people find confusing. If you have a very elderly or technophobe relative handy, use them to test!

    ...Can't think of anything else right now, get in contact if you need any more insight.

    4 points
  • Posted to Bower: Best served with a build tool, in reply to Mike Johnson , Nov 14, 2014

    I don't think so. Yeoman is a 'scaffold generator', it's neither a package dependency manager nor a build system. But it will slot into the workflow beautifully.

    1 point
  • Posted to Ask DN: Is OS X Yosemite good for actual work yet?, in reply to Charles Wiltgen , Sep 26, 2014

    Agreed it's a beautifully functional beta, but I always use it on a partition. Without even a 'gold-master' release I would never consider overwriting my stable OS. There has to be a reason why this is still beta.

    0 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: Is OS X Yosemite good for actual work yet?, in reply to Daniel Wiklund , Sep 25, 2014

    Fine...

    Answer: No

    6 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: Is OS X Yosemite good for actual work yet?, Sep 25, 2014

    Seriously wait. It's called beta for a reason. Despite what everyone here is saying there are probably still bugs, don't risk your work for what could only be a couple of weeks waiting.

    EDIT:

    Apple FAQ:

    "...Be sure to back up your computer using Time Machine before installing this pre-release software and install it only on non-production or machines that are not business critical."

    28 points
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