Val Sopi

Val Sopi

Designer, Developer, and Builder of Claritask.com Joined over 3 years ago via an invitation from Taulant S.

  • 6 stories
  • 14 comments
  • 3 upvotes
  • Posted to What's your process before starting a project?, in reply to Ed Fairman , Sep 22, 2017

    Hey Ed! Thanks for the good words. Just noticed your reply 8-months later :)

    1 point
  • Posted to 13 Lucky Steps on How to Manage a Design Project, Jan 25, 2017

    This post was inspired by Ed Fairman's question: "What's your process before starting a project?" https://www.designernews.co/users/13126/ed-fairman

    I've always been keen to processes that lead to successful outcomes. I've been tweaking and improving this process since college / and here I am some 17-years later.

    Hope it resonates with you. Would love to hear your thoughts.

    0 points
  • Posted to What's your process before starting a project?, in reply to Ed Fairman , Jan 25, 2017

    Hey Ed / I actually wrote an entire article on this. Felt inspired by your question and I've been itching to showcase my process, how I do it: https://vavingo.com/work-better/13-lucky-steps-on-how-to-manage-a-design-project

    Would love to hear your thoughts!

    1 point
  • Posted to The Ultimate Email-Course on How To Start Your Own Design Business!, Jan 24, 2017

    Hey guys. I've just written this course to help any designer out there who wants to start their own design business but doesn't know how.

    Each module (15 in total) is specific to each area of running a successful design firm. From finding clients, to value-based pricing, and all the way to working with remote teams (who will keep your overhead low, BTW).

    Ask me anything about the course. I would be more than happy to reply.

    0 points
  • Posted to How many designs do you usually present to the client?, in reply to Brittany Hunter , Jan 14, 2017

    Here it is Brittany > Minute 3:10

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xb8idEf-Iak

    0 points
  • Posted to What are your biggest obstacles?, Jan 13, 2017

    Believe it or not, for me it's always been someone that doesn't believe in the project and cannot articulate their thoughts on what we can do better!

    Saying "This will not work" without providing an alternative/context is a motivation killer for everyone in the team.

    Something I absolutely love is when someone says "This won't work! Here is how: a, b, c — agree?" — These are great people to have around.

    23 points
  • Posted to How many designs do you usually present to the client?, in reply to Ozan Caglargil , Jan 13, 2017

    I love that!

    3 points
  • Posted to How many designs do you usually present to the client?, in reply to ichik umer , Jan 13, 2017

    Very true Ichik! / It's definitely a process that you can't really define in rigid steps / In a sense, there is always one solution, no matter how many it takes to that one single best (regardless of how many you present)

    0 points
  • Posted to How many designs do you usually present to the client?, Jan 13, 2017

    Granted, that was Paul Rand talking. A legendary designer with an out-of-this-world track record. But, what about us, mere mortals... how do we handle these situations? Are you pressured by a "design committee" to present 3 options, because "that's what the management is expecting"? or do you stick to your guns and convince the client that 1 solution policy is what makes a project successful?

    2 points
  • Posted to What's your process before starting a project?, Jan 12, 2017

    A great question, that is usually overlooked.

    It definitely depends on the project/client, but all of us have a set "method to our madness".

    1. The way I end each client meeting is by making sure that I've gotten enough information without being inundated (I jot notes down on https://vavingo.com)
    2. I come back to the office and write down any quick inspirational thoughts (sometimes illogical, random)
    3. I let it sleep for at least a day / see which thoughts from the previous day stick & makes sense
    4. Research client's industry (business wise)
    5. Research creative directions in the industry / maybe make a mood-board / try to emulate an idea / look for styles/directions
    6. Write/Sketch/Think ideas
    7. Do the actual work (draw, photoshop, illus)
    8. Let it sleep again
    9. Finish up and select one direction to present
    10. Present to client
    11. Finalize based on feedback
    12. Send/Email/Message to client (usually no presentation on premise)
    13. Deliver the final version

    Earlier in my career I would tend to talk way to much in the kick-off meeting about possible outcomes, right there and then. I don't do that anymore, because you can't possibly know (not yet) what needs to get done & you don't have to show that you're capable (the reason I would babble in the early days). The client has picked you already (considering the project is a go).

    2 points
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