Steve O'Connor

Steve O'Connor

UK Interaction Designer Joined over 2 years ago

  • 0 stories
  • 42 comments
  • 14 upvotes
  • Posted to CREEPY WEBGL ENVIRONMENT/EXPERIMENT , Jul 25, 2019

    Hmmm. If you were a 3D design studio with a reputation for being edgy, I could maybe be persuaded to get it. But as a site for a web agency that wants to attract clients? No, I don't get it.

    A typical journey I foresee:

    What am I supposed to do? Click the red dot. Nothing happens. Click under the red dot - a new page! Nothing there. Hmmm. Scroll… ah-hah! Content! A contact form. Oh. Leave the site.

    And your work page (when I found it) doesn't explain the projects, or tell me about how you work -which most of our clients want to know - it just takes me to the sites you built. I didn't realise that with the first one until I tried to go back.

    It does feel very 2005 in both style and content. Sorry.

    2 points
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, in reply to Marc Edwards , Jul 18, 2019

    8⋀O

    1 point
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, Jul 17, 2019

    Interesting results, thanks for posting.

    0 points
  • Posted to Sole designer Advice & Feedback on dribbble posts, Jul 15, 2019

    Get networking.

    I avoided networking meetups for a few years, but that was at a time when they were more business focused - everyone sharing business cards and being secretive about how they worked. Now they're more open, and people are more than happy to discuss issues, clients, workarounds, etc.

    You're in London where there are a ton of great meetups and networks. Get along to some sessions, meet other designers, and you'll discover that you're just as self-critical and full of imposter syndrome as everyone else.

    It will be of far more use than posting things to Dribbble.

    One example to get you going: https://www.meetup.com/DesignLabLondon/

    1 point
  • Posted to Asked to make 70+ page wire prototype. Madness?, Jul 15, 2019

    A 70+ page fully interactive prototype is not standard for proper product development. It's overkill.

    As Rhys Merritt has suggested, it's normal and cost effective to create interactive prototypes for specific parts of a larger product, especially when it's a new type of flow, or a transition between flows.

    Anyone creating fully interactive prototypes - with no code - of a whole product is wasting money.

    1 point
  • Posted to Designers who are 40 plus, how are you..., in reply to Brijean Brennan , Apr 10, 2019

    It's strange to me that design is considered "a young industry" in terms of it all being people in their early to mid-twenties. The majority of designers I meet are over 30. Is it a cultural difference I wonder? I'm in the UK, not the USA.

    1 point
  • Posted to Designers who are 40 plus, how are you..., in reply to Mike Wilson , Apr 10, 2019

    Paula Scher, Milton Glaser, Dave Clark, Michael Johnson - practising older designers are rarer, but still around. With an ageing population and poorer pension plans, I expect to see a lot more around in the future.

    There is a perception that the most creative ideas come from younger creatives, but that isn't borne out when you really look at what goes on in agencies. It's a combination of the older and younger minds that really helps.

    Many designers also go off into other fields, or move into management, as a natural progression.

    I'm over the 40 mark, but I see myself continuing to practice. A lot of the time I'm the one with a better eye on the latest trends, which I find odd! A young mind maybe ;) I would be very interested in doing less hands-on and more management though…

    1 point
  • Posted to Who Runs The World - Infographics website for International Women's Day 2019, Mar 10, 2019

    Hurm…

    1. There are zero infographics on the site.
    2. Suggesting that alcohol is the best way to relax is not recommended.

    The sentiment is great though.

    3 points
  • Posted to Realtimeboard is now MIRO, in reply to Luke B , Mar 08, 2019

    Ah interesting, I hadn't seen that styling. Thanks for posting. Odd to change again so quickly.

    Slack are playing around with mixing photos, illustrations, and patterns, and there seems to be a move to collages. It's certainly a style I appreciate. I would imagine that they want to move away from the Upsplash look that everyone now uses :)

    2 points
  • Posted to Realtimeboard is now MIRO, Mar 08, 2019

    The new branding works for me - it's certainly an improvement on the blandness they had before. Yes, you can see an influence from Slack and DropBox, but it's definitely their own flavour. What's wrong with that?

    Miro is much better than Realtimeboard.

    It will be interesting to hear the story behind it and see how it develops.

    0 points
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