Jimmy Hooker

Jimmy Hooker

Designer Joined about 4 years ago

  • 2 stories
  • 138 comments
  • 30 upvotes
  • Posted to Flawless App review by Paul Hudson , in reply to lisa dziuba , Feb 15, 2018

    Will do, just purchased.

    0 points
  • Posted to Flawless App review by Paul Hudson , Feb 12, 2018

    Holy crap, where have you been all my life

    2 points
  • Posted to Flux: The €85,000 Failed Modular Multi-Messaging Client, Feb 09, 2018

    I don’t want to give advice; the world is full of un- or semi- successful entrepreneurs happily giving advice to anyone and even those who were successful are full of survivorship bias and most advice is bullshit anyways. If someone has a question I am always happy to answer as honest as I possibly can.

    This is the most true and mature thing I've ever read on Failory.

    5 points
  • Posted to Announcing Haiku’s public launch — motion design for iOS, Android, & Web, Feb 01, 2018

    This program is killer. I have found it crashing a few times, but it never lost my work. The concept and execution are there.

    I would love to see animate on a path, and to animate a path itself. That was the first animation I tried to make, and I saw you have a way to kinda do it by animating the x with linear and y with an ease-in cubic, but there's no way to draw a path, and it's very difficult to guestimate how to follow a potential path with your workaround.

    I wanted to make this mouse pointer click down and draw the loop. I know from your docs that this functionality is on the way, but man, it would make my day (and open my wallet) if this was possible.

    Potential Animation

    3 points
  • Posted to Bolt, in reply to Jon Myers , Jan 24, 2018

    This is absolutely not true.

    It's easy to presume that the way you think is the way everyone else thinks, but most people do not want to learn software, are not developers, and prefer someone showing them how it works and telling them the implementation plan. Look at 90% of enterprise software. Considering your statements, you would be blown away by how things are done at any organization of 100+ people. You are also presumably horrified by the idea of a cold call, but that's how an enormous amount of business gets done.

    Sales people are huge parts of organizations for a reason.

    17 points
  • Posted to Subverted Design, in reply to Joel Califa , Jan 17, 2018

    I appreciate the intention, I just feel like it’s overly sensitive and ignores problems that are far worse.

    The Airbnb thing to me is not sketchy, I’d like to understand you’re thinking on this more. I also think Facebook’s efforts to retain someone who is deactivating an account are pretty mild. They do far more shadey things with your data than they do with design based retention. Gamifying your attention with Skinner-box-like dopamine hits is far worse.

    In general, in an article like this I’d really want to understand what we’re fighting against, and why it’s bad. Your article is too high level, and instead of exploring the business vs design perspectives, it mostly focuses on a “badness” that has pervaded the design sanctuary.

    Rereading my responses, they’re definitely overly confrontational. However, I knew everyone in here would golf clap this and say “here here!”, and I feel like these ideas need to be challenged.

    I respect you, a lot of your writing is very good. I just disagree with some of your points here, and I think that nuance and detailed examples are pretty important in an opinion piece like this, especially from someone with influence.

    2 points
  • Posted to Subverted Design, in reply to Joel Califa , Jan 17, 2018

    The problem with the way you frame this whole article is that it comes down to the silicon valley ideal of "If we build it, and it's good, they will come, and they will purchase". This is true for a lucky few, and only up to a point. You've clearly worked for some companies where you've been lucky enough for this to be true fairly often.

    Too often in our industry, sales and marketing is looked at as some sort of manipulative evil. "If we have to sell it, then it must not be good, because the customer recognizes and purchases only greatness".

    With any of these things, the dose is the poison. If you ratchet up 'growth hacking' to a crazy degree, you get LinkedIn style contact scraping, or Uber level competitiveness with its now obvious downsides. But plenty of people implement these tactics without going overboard, and without harming or offending their users. I love the one-click buy button on Amazon. Does this button make me more likely to purchase something I might've hemmed and hawed about? Of course! Is that bad? Occasionally maybe? But overall I certainly enjoy it.

    Everything in moderation.

    I agree that it's hard to put every thought into a scoped article, but I feel like there's too much of an 'us vs them' mentality here. Why is the little hint that this AirBnB is being looked at by multiple people not user friendly? What if they don't get it, then come back two days later and realize it's been booked? Is that a good result or a bad result for the user?

    Every business is a balancing act between competing interests, constantly prioritizing. I don't think it's healthy to turn it into warring factions. I'd avoid it if I could. Just like we empathize with our users, we can empathize with the business side. Give them the benefit of the doubt.

    3 points
  • Posted to Subverted Design, Jan 17, 2018

    I agree with parts of this, but others just seem like standard sales and customer retention tactics, especially in some of the examples. They aren't dark patterns, they're not loot boxes (which, honestly, are much more evil than the examples given). The examples given are extremely mild ways to steer user behavior to serve the business. Of course we should make efforts to hang on to customers and to get them to purchase! That's the whole point!

    Designers and developers too often look at the business side of a company as the evil empire. This is often not the case. Building a business is enormously difficult even in good times. We can serve the user while also serving the business, they're not mutually exclusive. This isn't a zero sum game.

    There are definitely businesses that have the equation messed up, and the negotiation between serving user needs vs business is out of wack. But man, this doesn't even feel close to the mark. Look at Oracle bilking Oregon out of half a billion for their health care exchange. Look at the Skinner boxes that many modern games have become.

    Don't show me a little notice from AirBnB that tries to get me to commit to the place I'm already interested in but maybe on the fence about. If anything, I appreciate their nudge.

    4 points
  • Posted to Bond Conference, Jan 16, 2018

    Those backgrounds tho

    0 points
  • Posted to Selecting The Suitable CMS For Your Website, Jan 02, 2018

    This is horrible clickbait. Reported.

    0 points
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