Darren Treat

Software Developer / UX Joined about 3 years ago

  • 1 story
  • 59 comments
  • 2 upvotes
  • Posted to Computer glasses – best for design?, Mar 29, 2019

    Casual recommendation: If you are looking for blue light filtering products, all modern computers offer this in software as 'NightShift', 'Night Light' or the like. Additionally, understand that all methods of this affect your ability to design as per how your user will see your product and that you will have to review designs without them which may require rework. (Reducing blue light causes contrast differences spectrum-wide.)

    6 points
  • Posted to Redesigning Github repository page, Mar 01, 2019

    If you are a programmer, you might be surprised but other people normally don’t like hierarchies. Nested structures are hard to grasp, remember, navigate, and grouping is very often non-intuitive. Nested tabs are one of the worst UI patterns out there.

    Step one, redesign product for the people who don't use it.

    75 points
  • Posted to Sketch 53, Feb 05, 2019

    All I want in sketch is the ability to turn off inspect panel section hiding. Just display the right side in full without hiding the “styles” and such in an accordion.

    (Is there a way to do this?)

    4 points
  • Posted to Good UX and marketing advice to hook users inside the app. What do you think about it?, Jan 29, 2019

    Such apps have successfully adhered to Nir Eyal’s principles on building habit-forming products, leaving users “hooked”, gradually becoming a thread in their daily functional fabric.

    I think if you ever read this sentence and think "I'm doing a good thing!" after writing it, you really should step away from the keyboard. Addition is a serious and absolutely screwed up thing happening with these products, your product should not insert itself unneeded into people's lives.

    1 point
  • Posted to What book are you reading now?, in reply to Hugh Leoidsson , Jan 28, 2019

    I read this a few weeks ago, it’s fantastic.

    1 point
  • Posted to What do you look for in a note taking app?, Jan 23, 2019

    I always felt like many to-do apps were kinda just lists of places where tasks go to die, it's one of those things where they were for 'To-Do list people'.

    I would love a design that gives me a method the way described in 'Make Time' (book). with a few tweaks.

    Simple 'single task of the day' highlighting: basically a Star option but make it much more aggressive with different colors and font size.

    Automatic backlog management and removal: Give me the option to start every morning clean with nothing on it but have a menu to optionally pull over old tasks that never got done, ordered chronologically. This is important as it is great to start with a clean slate every day and the To-do list should be something you can put set time and priority to rather than a backlog of month-old items. Also let me define recurring tasks in this mode, a highlighted task should not be recurring by default.

    Task timing: Let me set a timer to finish a task with the ticker in the menu bar next to the name of the task, this helps focus as a clock is ticking. Make it fast and easy to use, don't be afraid to just give exponential-like numbers for minutes 5 > 15 > 30 > 60 > 90

    4 points
  • Posted to DN mobile app - when?, in reply to Tom Green , Jan 02, 2019

    Sure... but why?

    Everything here can be done via a PWA (Notifications and at least a 'better' UX) and there's little gain to them to build an app but the cost to do so would be hilarious. It is probably not feasible for them to pay someone to do it to a quality that would make a bunch of designers actually use it. They could probably build a hybrid app that is worth their time though.

    2 points
  • Posted to DN mobile app - when?, Dec 31, 2018

    Why?

    9 points
  • Posted to Does anyone else feel guilty for being a product designer?, in reply to Sara Andrew , Oct 02, 2018

    This is sadly very arguable. Who you work for also chooses you and your ideal choices will probably not give you an offer back or may not be hiring, your worst choice may be your only offer. Then do you choose eating and experience that may help you later or working for a company that you disagree with?

    I had to do this in 2012, while fresh out of college I took a job at Staples. Politically I wasn't where I was today but I still aggressively did not support the (at the time) Political candidate, Mitt Romney. Mitt was a founder of the capital firm Bain capital and while he was no longer on the staples board, he was in fact still a holder of equity in the firm's investments. This meant that the company increasing in value and making a profit increased the anti-gay marriage, anti-choice presidential candidate's ROI. To this end he even held press conferences in Staples stores. Meanwhile the company was outsourcing more and more of my job as a tech to Indian-based firms. This was the only company that called me back at the time and I had student loans due. Sadly morality is locked to opportunity, few remember that making moral choices in who you work for is a luxury to most.

    Remember however, you can make daily choices to improve the world. In my case I would do my best to help make people's lives better beyond the requirements of the job I had. In some cases it possibly meant going against policies that existed for profit rather than actually helping customers in which case I had to pick and choose my battles, at the end of the day it matters.

    3 points
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