joe anderson

joe anderson

building mightyscout.com Joined over 5 years ago via an invitation from Allan G. joe has invited Haziq Mir, Tony O'Donohoe, Gordon Tindall, Alaxic Smith and 2 others

  • 23 stories
  • 215 comments
  • 88 upvotes
  • Posted to Do you think that Product bundling is a Smart Strategy?, Apr 25, 2018

    There's a saas mac app that does this, I forget what it's called. But www.appsumo.com also does this quite a bit.

    It's definitely a viable idea for some depending on how its executed

    0 points
  • Posted to Should I learn prototyping in After Effects or apps like Flinto, in reply to Anmol Bahl , Apr 24, 2018

    sounds good, look forward to seeing your progress!

    0 points
  • Posted to Should I learn prototyping in After Effects or apps like Flinto, in reply to Anmol Bahl , Apr 24, 2018

    That's great to hear. I've found each time I step away from work I learn a lot has changed in our world, great opportunity to learn new things. HTML/CSS will become the standard if it already isn't when it comes to a UI/UX product designer, check out Buzzfeed's design interview questions for example. https://github.com/buzzfeed/design/blob/master/recruiting/interview-questions.md. I recommend html/css too but wouldn't want you to get overwhelmed as you already have a lot to think through already. Also html/css prototyping requires a lot of patience and code knowledge at first due to sequencing and such.

    I think Framer will hands down be the fastest way you're able to prototype those dribbble animations. It will also give you quick wins, where you could literally prototype something today whereas HTML/CSS will take you much more time. After you get comfortable in Framer, do HTML/CSS for sure.

    1 point
  • Posted to Should I learn prototyping in After Effects or apps like Flinto, Apr 24, 2018

    If you're investing for the long term I think something like framer would be well worth it. You will be closer to the code and understanding how to work closely with developers to get your actual design implemented. Most designers wouldn't go this route which will get you further ahead as more things in design get commoditized, like this for example https://www.producthunt.com/posts/artboard-studio. I think getting your skills closer to the end product will be the most beneficial in the long run. An added bonus is that your next step naturally would be building real prototypes that actually work because you invested in the core skills that are needed.

    6 points
  • Posted to Teamtreehouse for Design, Photography and more?, Mar 29, 2018

    www.udemy.com ?

    0 points
  • Posted to Side Project: Urban Plate, Mar 16, 2018

    What's your process around the photography of the food and recipes? Great work so far. Also what do you mean about seeking a company to help take this to the next level?

    0 points
  • Posted to Supernova Studio launches today - Convert Sketch to iOS, Android and RN, Mar 13, 2018

    Just wanted to say congrats on the launch and for thinking this far ahead to help make development much more accessible! Good luck with the continued iterations. I'll definitely give it a shot, let us know how we can help.

    0 points
  • Posted to Designers, what does trouble you in your journey of designing real-life projects? , in reply to Jonathan Shariat , Mar 07, 2018

    Curious how Figma's real time capabilities could help here if you were hypothetically using them. I imagine changing some text like headlines and subheadlines impacts the design so that would suck though. But maybe they can comment, and change paragraphs of text that don't impact the design as much?

    1 point
  • Posted to Designing for Blockchain: What will the much-hyped technology mean for developers, creatives, and UX designers?, in reply to Andrew Hersh , Dec 23, 2017

    It's possible, here's a good example of what the tech enables. Here's life today, let's say you wanted to buy a Ferrari and you had $300k in your bank account. You could out right buy it in cash but of course that's a bad investment and most people take a loan to make payments on a car. In order to get a loan for your down payment (to ensure you get lower interest rates long term) you'd have to go to a bank and request a loan. The bank then would do a bunch of calculations as to whether you'll be able to make this payment or not based on all the things you own, cash in the bank, credit checks, etc. They would then possibly say you're approved at a certain interest rate (because all the people involved in giving you that money have to get paid somehow). Think about the UX of this situation, you just wanted to buy a Ferrari and you're at the dealership, there's a lot of people involved just to make that happen because they need to make sure they can trust you on making that payment.

    Here's what life could look like with the power of the blockchain taking https://saltlending.com/ for example. Say you need $40k for a downpayment, you would just open your app and make a request. Now let's assume some of your $300k in the bank/assets you own is also due to owning some crypto's like Bitcoin. This app then says ok Andrew has $150k worth of Bitcoin in his account. If he agree's to forfeit $40k (+ interest) worth of his Bitcoin to whoever agrees to loan him $40k in dollars we can get him $40k dollars right now. Here's where things get cool with blockchain, decentralization, and technology. The system can make a smart contract (you can think of this as literally a paper contract/agreement but digital so that means it only needs code to run rather than people agreeing to start the contract because they saw it in real life). A smart contract is made that "takes" your $40k+ worth of bitcoin and puts it on the contract, this makes it so that you can't spend that bitcoin BUT it's still your bitcoin, its only in the contract in case you can't make your $40k payment over the lifetime of your loan (in the current world people use their houses for example as collateral). What's cool about this is you still own your investment, it's just used as collateral to ensure you payback who loaned you the money. That's ultimately what banks do but they have to do all sorts of stuff like run credit checks (cost money), check out your current assets (costs money/people time), admin work (people/money), potential debt collectors (people, hassle) etc. Then they need to issue you all sorts of paperwork that you sign agreeing to the terms. But since we're using the blockchain, all of that is abstracted away, so now the user can keep their investment it's only used as collateral that you're guaranteed to be able to payback the loan, you pay lower fee's and interest because there's less middlemen involved so there's less money needed to make it profitable, and they can make this transaction happen almost instantly. At the end of the day, everyone wins. If you don't fulfill the smart contract and can't pay the terms of the loan, the person gets your $40k worth of bitcoin (minus what you've already paid) instantly without any issues. If you do fulfill the smart contract, you get your bitcoin "back" instantly without any issues, again this is all happening with code not people so you can imagine it being done with big and small amounts in the thousands if not millions at a time. Now you can take this a step further (because its digital), let's say everyone on DN had $500 worth of spare cash, in the future they could pool this onto a network that then handles all of these loans automatically (because its digital), so now everyone on DN makes money and gets to help others rather than the banks.

    Overall design is a very important aspect of crypto's and sorely lacking, things like: communication design for clarity as you've seen in this thread alone, game theory to ensure all players in the ecosystem are properly incentivized, product design for viral loops/easy onboarding, and more.

    I hope this helps, it might not be totally accurate but I hope it gets the point across of the difference between the world today and what the world could be.

    6 points
  • Posted to Designing for Blockchain: What will the much-hyped technology mean for developers, creatives, and UX designers?, Dec 22, 2017

    Here's a cool take by a product designer on a popular blockchain based game https://medium.com/@TweetAnnaMarie/cryptokitties-and-whats-next-in-the-world-of-crypto-critters-fc158f271cef. A lot of it relates to game design, but I think the concept of getting around the cold start to jump start a network is very interesting.

    2 points
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