Andrew C

Design Director Joined over 2 years ago

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  • 297 comments
  • 10 upvotes
  • Posted to What Don Norman Taught Me About Design In 3 Minutes, Sep 25, 2018

    He's terrific. Also, I like his hat.

    1 point
  • Posted to Design Tools: When do we get stateful components?, in reply to Hamish Taplin , Sep 25, 2018

    We do 10 to 1. Designers are expected to do 10 low fidelity ideas for a design problem. As we converge down the process we build out real prototypes. This helps to include engineering in the design and research process. We test these prototypes with users. Then we converge more from what we've learned. Stakeholders are a part of the process the entire way. We don't pitch.

    For us I can't imagine the horror of handing engineers an invision prototype full of hidden nuance and expecting them to build. When we speak about details with devs not even a coded prototype beats a flat component library where you can see and scrutinize elements side by side. Sounds like this feature is to build prototypes quicker and with higher fidelity—useful, just not a huge pain for me.

    0 points
  • Posted to Design Tools: When do we get stateful components?, in reply to Jed Lehmann , Sep 25, 2018

    My goal here wasn't to upset you.

    It's clear we just have different team dynamics at work—you need better prototyping to get buy-in whereas I don't. It's just not a painkiller for my squads I think.

    0 points
  • Posted to Design Tools: When do we get stateful components?, in reply to Jed Lehmann , Sep 23, 2018

    Sure, but this is still an illustration of how it improves prototyping. Unless you're coding it yourself on the front-end (which I assume you are based on your post here) there's a huge risk in a messier handoff via hidden transitions or states. You'd still need a Zeplin or equivalent.

    I'm not finding as much delight in this focus for design tools as others seem to be — so I'm just asking to see what the big use cases are I might be missing out on.

    1 point
  • Posted to Design Tools: When do we get stateful components?, in reply to Tom Reinert , Sep 21, 2018

    I think my confusion is — you're almost certainly going to need to illustrate the different states side by side at some point. "This is initial, this is hover, this is active, etc" is a convo you'd have to have with a front-end dev. You may even want to red-line a component (like an accordion) to demonstrate and spec things out to be more precise.

    Makes sense that it helps ease the burden on throwing a prototype together. I'd been reading and hearing people speak about stateful components and I couldn't understand why there was such a high demand (I still don't see it as anything more than a nice to have). But I get the prototyping thing — thanks.

    0 points
  • Posted to Design Tools: When do we get stateful components?, in reply to Jed Lehmann , Sep 21, 2018

    Is it mostly a convenience when demonstrating a prototype? (you don't have to have entire screens just for a hover state)

    1 point
  • Posted to Design Tools: When do we get stateful components?, Sep 21, 2018

    I honestly have no idea what I'd do with stateful components or why this is important for other designers.

    Usually state within designs is conveyed by showing the contrast between states. Before and after side by side. A rollover would be nice in prototyping but I can't see much else to do with it. What am I missing?

    0 points
  • Posted to Uber rebrand, in reply to Ray Martin , Sep 14, 2018

    Tomayto tomahto

    0 points
  • Posted to If Digital Product Designers Designed Physical Products (comics), in reply to Pablo Stanley , Sep 05, 2018

    Either a 9 or a 4. This system is flawless!

    1 point
  • Posted to When Is the Best Time to Conduct Usability Testing?, Sep 04, 2018

    Every time someone proposes a fix to a flow or UI... you should be running a benchmark test to know A) How bad is this flow, really? and B) When you change the flow... did it improve, get worse, or stay the same?

    These tests are VERY cheap to do—often you can do them in a hallway with non-engineering staff to get a general sense of issues... and then bring in users to verify this. It's honestly the #1 way you measure design success.

    2 points
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