Jan Semler

Jan Semler

Karlsruhe | Germany Digital Design Nomad Joined over 3 years ago

  • 61 stories
  • 389 comments
  • 173 upvotes
  • Posted to How to convince your team to follow design guidelines? , in reply to Romain Sourdiaux , Feb 20, 2019

    Happy to help.

    0 points
  • Posted to How to convince your team to follow design guidelines? , Feb 20, 2019

    It is hard to tell your designers what they should do if nothing is established. An idea would be to reject every design until it follows the guidelines. But business wise not a good idea for the feature pipeline ;-)

    Back in my days i was a designer who don't followed rules. The best thing that happened to me was that i worked very closely with an developer and he showed me what it means to develop my ideas, it was pain. He showed me what could and couldn't be done or what it would take to create something (Crazy Animations and so on).

    So these days UI/UX Designer are working very similar to the development department. In terms of Agile Development, Sprints and so on. For example Abstract forces the Designer to work in an agile environment and workflow.

    Another aspect of guidelines is, they need to be broken sometimes because of technological change or a new business direction. But this is not the point, your designers want to create something new, guides are boring.

    My tip for you, be transparent and say why it is important to follow the guides and if some of the designers like to break a rule ask why? If the answers: because it looks better. Than say: this is not what i wanted i want a solution followed by the guidelines and not something that might look pretty. I want a solution that our user understand (Search for Cognitive Load). Tell them why it is important to have guidelines:

    1. Consistency
    2. Handoff for Dev and for new Designers
    3. Everybody know what is talked about this and that component
    4. It will have a huge effect for the development if it is synced in terms of components (What you build, will be developed 1to1)
    5. Easy workflows when done right for your design team.

    You will find way more information about the guidelines in the web, use it. Another thing is so that your designers still having fun designing do some hackathons or other projects where they can do what they want but with an positive effect of your main product.

    Designers are like animals, they need always new food, not everyday the same old bread.

    1 point
  • Posted to Ageism in Tech: Why Older Designers Are Better Than Younger Designers, in reply to Dragos Gavrila , Feb 20, 2019

    Sure, but you need to consider technological change. Creating weblayouts on Photoshop is completly different than in Sketch. You will be faster in Sketch which gives you more creative time instead of pushing pixels in PS. Also Paradigms doesn‘t count when something new shows up, React for example.

    0 points
  • Posted to How tiny changes in typography have dramatically increased time on the page, Feb 20, 2019

    It is hard to read. You cannot see words seperately. It is like one big word per block. Also Vadim might right, they take longer because it is hard to read. So is the conversion up or down?

    Also didn‘t understand why some designers using spacings in their designs so massivly. Fonts are created in a way so you shouldn‘t change letter spacing at all. if you do it because it might look better, then you doing something wrong. It is another case if you have a weak font and need to make adjustments for readabilty. But to use for visual esthetics or for performance improvements i doubt that it has any effect.

    1 point
  • Posted to Ageism in Tech: Why Older Designers Are Better Than Younger Designers, Feb 19, 2019

    As i am consider my self old, that means i am a good designer? Thought works do and not my personal ego. I should write medium articles, because i can which means because i am old that i write better than younger people.

    Silly discussion. If you are old you just got way more experience but that doesn't necessary mean i am better than the younger ones. But this is just my lazy old opinion.

    secretly putting dentures back in

    1 point
  • Posted to ASK DN: What do you think of my first enterprise identity design?, Feb 14, 2019

    Hard to read, dunno what they do, is it a K?

    • Check Spacings
    • Logo should mean something
    • Instead of animate the logo take care of typography
    • There is more than just a Logo if you wanna call it a Identity.
    • If you wann create great logos you will need to explore forms, typography, colors and so on and not in 3 hours i mean days. If you dive deep into these topics you will get a lot of ideas which will result in a great logo which can hold the stakeholder smashing.

    A good first step but there is way more to it. Good luck in your journey! And welcome to DN we are happy to see more Logos or Animations from you.

    1 point
  • Posted to Sketch: How to exclude symbols from shared library, Feb 08, 2019

    Got a similar problem There is somewhere a plug where you can find symobls on artborads

    https://twitter.com/jansemler/status/1090277370488147970?s=21

    0 points
  • Posted to What is the correct approach for gathering feedback from different departments at the same time?, in reply to David Melendez , Feb 08, 2019

    So you should deliver your design as the marketing whishes. Just say that excel is confusing for you and not really suited to give you best possible feedback. Just say: Please use this because our devs use it, designers use it, product manager use it.

    Thing is: You need one channel of feedback not multiple. You will need more time to open excel, Invision, Zeplin and so on. Just try and explain why you want one channel of feedback.

    2 points
  • Posted to What is the correct approach for gathering feedback from different departments at the same time?, Feb 08, 2019

    What about Abstract? Would also help in version control and so on? Dunno if the feedback features are that evolved since i am not using it. But i think it is worth a try.

    4 points
  • Posted to Does anyone here actually use UI kits?, Feb 07, 2019

    Sometimes, it is good to kickstart a project. When you need a visual concept to show it to the clients for pitches. The others are templates.

    There are two kind of kits. One that works with the visual appeal the other one are template kits.

    If i work for a company who has to build up a new system it would be worthy to have look on new template kits where you have the groundwork setup. You would have cheaper development costs and when the template is flexible enough to alter the design. The other ones are just visual comcepts where color fonts work in harmony, you know the drill.

    Be aware some of them might look good but lacking of systematic or are complex to use and to unterstand.

    I come to the conclusion to build my own template and habe all nessecary elemtns as template. I use kits to have a look on how others build up their systematic to learn an adapt it to my template. My goal is to habe a flexible template for my needs.

    0 points
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