Aaron Larner

Aaron Larner

Member of Technical Staff @trello Joined over 6 years ago via an invitation from Allan G. Aaron has invited Abby Larner

  • 7 stories
  • 40 comments
  • 29 upvotes
  • Posted to Any rock climbers out there?, in reply to Yitong Zhang , Jun 23, 2017

    Hey Yitong, if you've got a few minutes to chat I'd love to get your feedback on the idea and our first batch of sketches. My email is aaron@climbalytics.com

    0 points
  • Posted to Any rock climbers out there?, in reply to Andrew Pairman , Jun 23, 2017

    Thanks Andrew, feel free to hit me up at aaron@climbalytics.com and we can figure out a time or let me know the best way to get in touch with you.

    0 points
  • Posted to Any rock climbers out there?, in reply to Martijn van de Zuidwind , Jun 23, 2017

    Thank you Martijn! If you shoot me an email we can figure out a good time to chat. aaron@climbalytics.com

    1 point
  • Posted to Any rock climbers out there?, in reply to Taylor Lapeyre , Jun 23, 2017

    Awesome! What's the best way to get in touch? Feel free to ping me at aaron@climbalytics.com and we can set up something for next week.

    0 points
  • Posted to AngularJS vs. React — Which One to Pick?, Jan 02, 2016

    "With that in mind, it appears that Angular and React are by no means competing for the top-spot of being the best all around front-end framework. Instead, they can be used together to create astonishingly fast web and mobile applications."

    This couldn't be further from the truth. I don't know any developers who would recommend using Angular and React together.

    0 points
  • Posted to AngularJS vs. React — Which One to Pick?, in reply to Ed Adams , Jan 02, 2016

    I've taught both react and angular in my classes. If you are comfortable with JavaScript I think react is far easier to learn. There are only a few major concepts to grok. After you know those, the rest is just JavaScript. Alternatively, angular is much more of a full fledged complete JavaScript framework. It has way more features and way more things to learn. There is a vibrant community of developers who can help you out and lots of tutorials if you want to do a specific thing (like the frobt end pieces of user authentication). One downside in addition to the numerous concepts you'll need to learn is that if since angular is so different from vanilla JavaScript, the concepts you learn are not transferable to other tools, libraries and frameworks. Additionally the new version of angular (angular 2) is a major change and will eventually make angular 1 knowledge obsolete. My pick is react, but with any tooling decision, it depends where you're coming from.

    3 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: How Can I Teach Myself to Code Using Internet?, Dec 28, 2015

    Hey Sandeep, I'm an instructor at a code school and in the past I've had all of my students do Codecademy as prep work. I'm actually switching them over to Kahn Academy in the future because I think they do a better job at solidifying the fundamentals and their interactive editor seems to be better. As you've already noticed, it's hard to learn to code if you're not consistent. The number one piece of advice I'd give you is to code every day for a couple months. It doesn't have to be hours of practice. Even five minutes will help you retain what you've learned. I just discovered this on Hacker News and it might be helpful for you to build consistency: http://codehalf.com/

    If you're on GitHub they keep track of your longest streak, so keeping an eye on that can help to build consistency too.

    In terms of what to learn, most programming languages are very similar. If you learn the core basics, they will help you with any other language you learn. If you haven't learned HTML and CSS yet I'd start there. These aren't really programming languages, they are more for visual presentation and layout, but are fundamental if you're planning on doing any sort of web programming. Once you've learned a bit of HTML and CSS pick any other popular language (JavaScript, Ruby, Python, PHP, Java, etc.) and learn the fundamentals of programming. That includes types, variables, boolean / conditional logic, loops and functions. Mastering these topics are going to help you no-matter what type of programming you end up doing in almost any language you choose to use.

    2 points
  • Posted to Wysihtml – lightest cross-platform rich text editor for web apps, in reply to Nathan Gathright , Dec 17, 2014

    Ahh missed that. Did an on page search for "internet explorer" and found nothing. oops.

    0 points
  • Posted to Wysihtml – lightest cross-platform rich text editor for web apps, Dec 17, 2014

    I see these WYSIWYG editors popping up every so often. I'm very interested in new tools in this area, but the first thing I look for is browser compatability. Some of us still need to support older browsers. Please list browser compatability on the home page!

    0 points
  • Posted to Alternatives to Wordpress, Dec 12, 2014

    Check out http://900dpi.com - great for smaller statics sites that you still want clients to be able to edit.

    2 points
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