Cover-photo-2016-10-09_09_05_56__0000-3311820161009-3-lm9z00
Thomas Michael Semmler

Thomas Michael Semmler

Vienna, Austria UI Engineer. I'm a bit mean sometimes Joined almost 4 years ago

  • 18 stories
  • 795 comments
  • 116 upvotes
  • Posted to The $10k Website Process: Learn to design high value websites, in reply to Nathan Allotey , Sep 20, 2019

    You can literally pick any. I am not saying that there are not great teachers out there who also offer courses of really good value, but in general this increase in course volume is due to the fact that the design and tooling landscape is scattered and that there is a lot of anxiety around this. Most of it comes from not using the tools like everybody else - believing that this is a bad thing.

    If you start a javascript learning course and the first 30 minutes of the course are dedicated to installing oh my zsh and operator mono, you already know its not about the subject they are claiming to teach, its about reducing your anxiety levels by telling you how to feel like everyone else.

    Many people aren't using figma because its it works better for them, they are because its they believe its the next thing. And all of a sudden you have an entire tool-shaming-anxiety economy. With blogposts explaining why they think that tool or the other one is superior, with ui kits and libraries all surrounding this economy - rarely free of course, and then there are the courses, which all prey on this situation.

    Take this course for example - I am sure there is some value for someone in there, but in "learn how to design high value websites" has nothing to do with how much you are getting paid for it. The subject does not have anything to do with the actual craft of making a website, its purely business.

    Yet the contents of the course make it believe like that is the case. They prey on an inner monologue that goes something like "I'm not good enough; how can I recreate those dribbble shots?" - Its distorted reality, because the majority of us do not practice our craft like that. Dribbble is like instagram for designers: it's fake.

    And that course does the same. It claims to teach you how to sell your services at a high pricepoint, by teaching you basics of the craft. That aint how you get paid more. It just is not true.

    0 points
  • Posted to Sketch 58 Smart Layout is here! Live example here, in reply to Seth C , Sep 20, 2019

    honestly, it truly is at this point.^

    0 points
  • Posted to Sketch 58 Smart Layout is here! Live example here, in reply to Emski Kool , Sep 19, 2019

    dimensions of all modules on the site influence the artboard height

    I'm not sure I understand this. You want the artboard size to increase with its contents?

    flex box like reordering of content into a new row or column, fully automatic

    I can get behind that. It would be great to define behaviour for how container treat their children.

    0 points
  • Posted to Sketch 58 Smart Layout is here! Live example here, in reply to Emski Kool , Sep 19, 2019

    Stacks

    What do you mean by that?

    0 points
  • Posted to Sketch 58 Smart Layout is here! Live example here, in reply to P.J. Onori , Sep 19, 2019

    literally! People need to realize that this type of tool shaming is counterproductive. Some people still design in fireworks and it works for them.

    0 points
  • Posted to The $10k Website Process: Learn to design high value websites, in reply to Joey Prijs , Sep 16, 2019

    You know what I have had? It. I have had it with this constant self promoting of luke-warm, barely valued digital-only content.

    2 points
  • Posted to What does this portfolio site convey to you?, Sep 12, 2019

    It looks like spam, to be honest. Why? Because I see offers and services like this every day and none of them provide a bio, links to social media (like social media where I can get a tiny fraction of you as a person, not github or linked in) or just a "who am I?" expanded paragraph.

    The messaging is very, very generic and has no content.

    I use UX research to solve problems and craft digital experiences

    Thats an empty statement. This is the equivalent of a fresh of university developer saying "I turn coffee into code", but this time it's from a person who's more into startup culture and economics, but still likes technology. You need a better paragraph that describes what you do, because from reading this it sounds like you don't really know yourself what you do, instead you just follow best practices from web industry personalities. And I don't think that is truly the case, it just reads that way to me.

    Visually I think someone has already said everything relevant at this point already. But I will add that the font size is just too big. It's very hard to read, even on mobile. And I'd reduce the left margin on the .section_work_work_body_wrapper Elements, or remove it completely.

    An advice for the CSS: If you set your line-heigh for paragraphs or headlines, it is in general a good practice to set it unitless instead of using rem.

    1 point
  • Posted to Office hours with the Head of Design at Palantir and more, in reply to Juozas Deksnys , Sep 12, 2019

    are you kidding me? Back to design school. Design is political.

    1 point
  • Posted to 8 signs that you need a website redesign, in reply to Sumit Hegde , Sep 11, 2019

    Because none of your issues require a redesign. It is bad, bad to think that you have to redesign an entire website if any of those things don't work. As a designer you should advise your clients to analyse the problem and take conscious action on an appropriate level that is also economic.

    Almost all of the things you listed are content problems that do not require redesigning a website. They might require redesigning certain parts of a website - but a redesign will not solve your content strategy issues.

    This is especially true for sass products. They need to be continuously integrated and supported. Not a redesign every 6 months but a continuous stream of incremental changes of specific parts, sometimes larger, sometimes smaller is appropriate.

    1 point
  • Posted to 8 signs that you need a website redesign, Sep 10, 2019

    I think you spelled "Why you should hire a Content Strategist instead of a designer" in your title wrong.

    7 points
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