Chris Arnold

Chris Arnold

Partner at Authentic Form & Function Joined over 6 years ago via an invitation from Bryant H.

  • 26 stories
  • 87 comments
  • 31 upvotes
  • Posted to Remote Life: The Remote Worker’s Guide to Travel, in reply to Austin Knight , May 01, 2016

    Thanks Austin, it's nice to hear you took something away from these reads. And you should—start up a shop when the time is right! It's a lot of work, but if you're doing it for the right reasons, it's worth it. Cheers.

    0 points
  • Posted to Remote Life: Making Exercise a Priority, in reply to Mike Heitzke , Mar 31, 2016

    Totally agree. It's funny how it's easier to be tied to the desk even though we intended to set it up to pan out in an entirely different way.

    1 point
  • Posted to Site Design: Details, Jan 29, 2016

    Loading fast for me in the U.S. Aesthetic and timing digs of others aside, seems like a really solid site for their company. Technically impressive. I didn't look: is there a mobile version? Congrats on the launch!

    1 point
  • Posted to Ask DN: Where do you draw the honesty line?, in reply to Thompson George , Jan 15, 2016

    lol

    1 point
  • Posted to Ask DN: Where do you draw the honesty line?, in reply to Floyd Williamson , Jan 15, 2016

    Hey Ted, I’m sorry my posts have fired you up lately. That’s obviously not my intention.

    Right away you take a shot at me about giving candidates constructive criticisms as a more helpful way to approach the topic. The fact is, we do, and a lot. As painful as it is, we not only reply to every single person, but also provide them with a more detailed “why” if they’re taking the time to ask us.

    And you’re right, a lot of juniors get into the field with a lack of mentorship, which is why we take that time with them. But in addition to that, we’re also taking the time to ask about why we’re seeing this, and the best way to provide that feedback and mentorship moving forward.

    With regards to your emphatic dissection of our company website, no one here said they were the best designer on the planet, or weren’t working around certain constraints, or aren’t consistently learning how to execute things better in the future. The animation you’re referring to has actually garnered a lot of attention and excitement for trying something new. Is it perfect? No, it isn’t.

    I'm not crapping on people. You’re crapping on people (me, and my team). You’re right, I could do the same with your work, but I’m not. And I’m not crapping on any other specific person’s work, for that matter, ever.

    The point of my post, which you missed, is that I’m seeing very subpar work, in this case from a single organization, and I’m asking to a group of professional creatives, how they approach that greater concern and related feedback without coming across poorly.

    And, hopefully, ultimately moving the entire community to a more well balanced and empathetic group without, as you said it, crapping on each other.

    12 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: Where do you draw the honesty line?, in reply to Aaron Sagray , Jan 15, 2016

    In total agreement here. We're never negative, always constructive, and the goal is to remain honest when a specific designers asks us what they can improve upon.

    I don't disagree the initial premise of the program isn't necessarily in line with more well known design schools, but as I noted in another reply below, at least provide students with a realistic expectation of what the program is preparing them for. Also of note, I'm not advocating that "poverty" conditions or not everyone's got a fair shot or starts from the same place.

    In the end, it's the work that matters, and I'm on board with that notion. I think, too, it's educating on general awareness and an understanding of what kind of job they're going after with such experience.

    0 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: Where do you draw the honesty line?, in reply to Chris O , Jan 15, 2016

    I agree that it's not our responsibility to necessarily dive deeper with each grad from a particular school, but it still brings up what expectations are being set within that program. And that's what I wonder about: what are those teachers saying? What are those program leaders expecting from what they're offering?

    What I expect from young designers is a general sense of awareness of what they're doing in the first place. Looking at their portfolio sites and comparing them to the company's they apply towards, for example. Being thoughtful.

    If it's a technical school, great!, provide expectations to students that the course work is providing a great fit in a print shop, or doing some production work as an intern while they grow. Nothing negative—just the reality of the program.

    1 point
  • Posted to Ask DN: Where do you draw the honesty line?, in reply to Anthony Gibson , Jan 15, 2016

    Great points. Half the battle is understanding what quality design work is in the first place, and the rest is trying to apply those approaches to work (e.g. client work) where the slate may not be free and clear of some junk.

    1 point
  • Posted to Ask DN: Where do you draw the honesty line?, in reply to Anthony Gibson , Jan 15, 2016

    I agree with these points as well. When I'm talking about sub par work, this isn't that :) Michael, keep up the strong work here and aim to get a little better with each project. Loving the suggestion to "pitch" a company, too, which Anthony elegantly points out as well.

    2 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: Where do you draw the honesty line?, in reply to jj moi , Jan 15, 2016

    That's been our move as well, typically. Sometimes we'll hear back from applicants asking "why" and we'll keep it brief, but note a few constructive items of feedback that may stand out.

    0 points
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