Cover-photo-2015-05-30_03_23_12__0000-262020150530-3-1xs0i33
Silas Reeves

Silas Reeves

Sr. Designer @ John McNeil Studio Joined over 6 years ago via an invitation from Jason J. Silas has invited Adomas Tautkus

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  • 10 upvotes
  • Posted to How to find a corporate color (for both RGB/CMYK), in reply to Nicholas Hendrickx , Nov 09, 2013

    I feel your pain. I've had a similar experience.

    What I would suggest is to try and find a CMYK variation of the blue and green you want that has the best possible 'pop' ( or brightness). Don't include much ( or all ) black in the mix, it will dull things. If you have too level of the other three, it will grey things out. Just think, what colors "pop" best in print? 100% Cyan + nothing, 100% Magent + nothing, 100% Yellow + nothing. So mix your CMYK blend accordingly. Also, educate the client about the difference between CMYK, RGB, and Pantone. And think about how often the brand colors will live in print versus screen. In print, think about whether it will be worth it to print PMS for branding materials like cards and letterhead, etc... or to print CMYK. I mean worth it in terms of time / money. Anyway, good luck!

    2 points
  • Posted to ITT: Post your best design puns., Aug 20, 2013

    Q: Have you heard about the new pirate font?

    A: It's all Arrrrrrrrrrsss!

    1 point
  • Posted to Hollow Icons, Aug 20, 2013

    The article cited by the author of this post concludes with this:

    "Word shape is no longer a viable model of word recognition. The bulk of scientific evidence says that we recognize a word’s component letters, then use that visual information to recognize a word. "

    Which would appear to contradict the original author's statement of "(;tldr is that you read ‘shapes’ not individual letters)."

    I do not see how this paper supports his claim against hollow icons.

    1 point
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