Cover-photo-2017-02-16_10_49_25__0000-248020170216-4-1nus4ie
Martin LeBlanc

Martin LeBlanc

Batman @ Iconfinder Joined almost 6 years ago

  • 54 stories
  • 342 comments
  • 86 upvotes
  • Posted to New Design Tools (Spring 2019), in reply to Thomas Michael Semmler , Apr 05, 2019

    No, let's ask Figma to save us.

    1 point
  • Posted to Slack new logo!, in reply to Cihad Turhan , Jan 20, 2019

    I like these colors better :D

    1 point
  • Posted to Animate an SVG icon in After Effects CC, in reply to Jrtorrents Dorman , Dec 11, 2018

    Ok, got it.

    0 points
  • Posted to Animate an SVG icon in After Effects CC, in reply to Jrtorrents Dorman , Dec 11, 2018

    Why do you think that?

    0 points
  • Posted to Design Appreciation: Itsycal – a free menubar calendar app with VIM-like depth to it, in reply to Chris Frees , Oct 04, 2018

    I think you are right

    0 points
  • Posted to What Is The Difference Between A Great Startup Designer And A Mediocre One?, in reply to Ross Simmonds , Jan 04, 2018

    Not really. I would say the most important thing is to hire the right persons. If people have been working as designers in large agencies, they might have taught themselves the wrong way to work and are stuck in that mindset. The culture of startups is very different. In agencies you often get paid per hour - it doesn't matter much if it takes 8 or 12 hours to finish a design task. In a startup you should be ask yourself if you need to do a "design" at all before any work is done. Can we skip the a design in photoshop and just do the design while prototyping in HTML? That's the sort of thinking that is valuable to startups.

    0 points
  • Posted to What Is The Difference Between A Great Startup Designer And A Mediocre One?, Nov 20, 2017

    I've had both and I can share my experience. When you are running a startup you have two resources that are incredibly scarce: Money and time. If a designer (or any employee) fails to understand that, then he/she is a bad fit for a startup.

    I can give an example: we had to redesign a part of the UI. It took a designer we hired about 2 weeks to create a pixel-perfect design. It was handed to a developer who ended up doing it slightly different because the design didn't work on the underlying front-end framework (it would take a long time to change). This was simply too much time spent compared to the value we as a company got from the design.

    In comparison, we had a designer who skipped all drawing tools and just cranked out the layout in HTML, CSS and JS. He ended up making much more pleasant solutions because he could work with the interaction design more easily. He would spend 10-20% of the time to solve a task and at the same time do some of the devs work.

    This won't work for all types of design work - these examples were very focused on UI/interaction design.

    The last thing I would add is to make sure designers in startups are ready to switch tools, workflows etc. Being flexible and have a broad skill set is great for startups. A startup by definition will change a lot. One year you are two person team, a couple of years later you might be 20 or 50. It's very important that the employees can evolve along with the company.

    4 points
  • Posted to Will Apple introduce a new monitor?, in reply to Gracjan Zlotucha , Sep 26, 2017

    At least in the previous version:

    https://cdn-std.dprcdn.net/files/acc_531545/pblcQJ

    0 points
  • Posted to Side Projects for Designers, in reply to Parvez S , Sep 21, 2017

    I'm not sure if anyone has ever thought about this.

    1 point
  • Posted to Most website redesigns are a waste of money. What sets successful ones apart?, Sep 21, 2017

    9 out of 10 redesigns are redesigns of existing elements. Too often the designers don't step back and ask if the current design is solving the right problems for the customers. The result is often just a new layer of paint on a solution to the wrong problem.

    2 points
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