Mike Wilson

Freelance Joined over 4 years ago

  • 1 story
  • 281 comments
  • 123 upvotes
  • Posted to Mac Pro, in reply to Jan Semler , Jun 06, 2019

    I think there’s been a massive misunderstanding here based around the “pro” naming.

    The MacBook Pro has become so popular people think of it as a prosumer machine...however this Mac Pro is truly a “Pro” machine, there’s nothing Prosumer about it. If you are just dabbling in 3D rendering you are not a pro.

    You will be completely fine with an upgraded iMac or Mac mini or MacBook Pro or even the iMac Pro if you want to get crazy.

    If things like the ability to natively edit RAW 6K ProRes with Live Color correction and is of no benefit to you....why would you even think of buying a machine like this??

    It’d be like if you wanted to just try your hand at film production and bought a $40,000 RED camera (professional film gear) instead of a used canon 5D mark iii (prosumer film gear).

    1 point
  • Posted to Why do you think this community has died?, in reply to Scott Thomas , May 23, 2019

    I found all of those things tiring and uninteresting (very Linkedin)...hence why I've stuck around here instead.

    2 points
  • Posted to Why do you think this community has died?, May 23, 2019

    I've been here for years now and it seems the low point was when downvoting was introduced.

    Since then things have rebounded a bit, and seem to be slowly getting back to normal.

    It's never been a super active community, which I used to be annoyed by but am starting to find refreshing. If you want to see the community get better, start posting interesting links and quality comments. Be the change you want to see in the world.

    3 points
  • Posted to Designer News Subreddit, in reply to Jesse C. , May 06, 2019

    It's a law of nature. Any design-related subreddit must devolve into normies asking what the name of this corny-ass wedding font is 4 times every hour.

    0 points
  • Posted to Designers who are 40 plus, how are you..., in reply to Ryan Hicks , Apr 13, 2019

    You haven't seen any because the people just now nearing that age were the first designers.

    Visual software interfaces have been common since the 80s.

    Also what makes you think the design industry as it is now—UX and UI design as you say—will continue to exist in its current form in 10 years? If design has completely changed in the last decade, why do you think the changes are suddenly going to stop?

    I think we’re all fooling ourselves as to the real reason there’s no old people in design (whether it’s in tech OR old school editorial design at magazines). The truth is, ageism is a far bigger problem than we want to admit, and keeping up with trends as you age is a harder task than we think.

    0 points
  • Posted to Designers who are 40 plus, how are you..., in reply to Bevan Stephens , Apr 12, 2019

    there are fewer older people in the tech industry right now, because it has risen up quite quickly

    So you think the progression of technology is going to start slowing down? That goes contrary to everything we know.

    People have this false idea that the world pre-internet and post-internet was some big dividing line...and it was just a bunch of "lazy" people who couldn't make the jump. But the tech industry has always been there, making progress and steadily changing every year (in design think of the changes from metal typesetting > phototypesetting > desktop publishing > websites > skeuomorphic interactive web apps > flat design mobile apps > ??). And the rate at which this is happening is increasing.

    It's cognitive dissonance to think, "Sure, I don't work with any old people now, but everything will be different when I'm older! I'm special and will be able to keep up, unlike my lazy grandparents!"

    Personally, I'm investing a large portion of my income as I don't want to place of the burden of supporting me on my children or other people. In the tech industry, we make more money than most people do. My feeling is, to not save and invest given that, is foolish.

    -3 points
  • Posted to Designers who are 40 plus, how are you..., in reply to Bevan Stephens , Apr 11, 2019

    I'm amazed this is the top comment and I hope all of you live in countries with robust government safety nets or have large inheritances from your parents.

    If you don't have a planned exit strategy from design (ie. either enough savings/investments/government support to retire...or eventual career pivot to McDonalds), you're going to have a bad time.

    I also like what I do and want to continue doing it, but I know I'm kidding myself to think both A) I'll be able to keep up with the latest technology forever and B) companies are going to want to hire a 75 year-old geriatric to design whatever machine-learning 3D AR/VR interfaces we're using 30 years from now.

    2 points
  • Posted to 1 week into my new job and I'm thinking about quitting., in reply to Thomas Michael Semmler , Apr 11, 2019

    James is spot on here.

    If a company of that size (30+ employees) stands to lose so much from you leaving it...it's a poorly run company.

    People leave. People get sick. People die. It might hurt our egos to understand this, but a stable well-run business is one where the processes & decisions are well defined and documented so that employees can all be easily replaced.

    3 points
  • Posted to Designers who are 40 plus, how are you..., in reply to Thomas Michael Semmler , Apr 10, 2019

    How many 65 year old designers have you worked with? Is it more common to see older people in the design industry where you’re from?

    Stuff like this scares the hell out of me. In the US, I’ve worked at maybe 20+ big offices (between NYC/SF/Chicago) with large sample sizes of people and have seen maybe 3 people over the age of 50 working as a designer.

    Hell, the managers I’ve worked under have mostly been under 45.

    1 point
  • Posted to Using a static site generator at scale, in reply to Matthew Blode , Apr 09, 2019

    Your last point is very important.

    My advice to OP would be to not fall into the trap of the latest shiny object. Gatsby/Hugo + Netlify is definitely an awesome setup for something like a portfolio or a brochure site that doesn't get updated frequently. Continuous deployment from Git to Netlify is a dream.

    HOWEVER, for an editorial site being updated daily, having a workflow where you can update via logging into a CMS with robust SEO features is going to be far more important. Netlify CMS (which you can attach to Hugo, etc) is just okay, and doesn't offer enough features out of the box.

    If I was OP I'd go flat file CMS like Statamic or Kirby, or if you're not well versed in front-end development, gasp Wordpress. Wordpress, while bloated and generally terrible to work with, has plugins to handle every possible scenario an editorial site will encounter. Setting it up at first will suck, but the writing experience will be a much faster workflow.

    1 point
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