Cover-photo-2015-05-30_04_29_22__0000-1915320150530-3-1v0nyfh
Mike Wilson

Mike Wilson

Freelance since '08 Joined over 2 years ago

  • 0 stories
  • 252 comments
  • 112 upvotes
  • Posted to Site Redesign: Pentagram, in reply to Aaron Wears a hat , Jul 20, 2017

    Is it really a massive assumption to make that blind people aren't into graphic design and graphic design agencies? I'd be happy to change my mind if you have some examples.

    I also don't think its a big assumption to think there aren't illiterate people researching the exploits of an exclusive B2B corporate branding firm doing $500,000+ projects.

    They should've totally thrown alt tags in because the effort would have been minimal and it's good for SEO anyways. However accessibility concerns being the top comment given the context and purpose of this site makes zero sense.

    This site isn't the same as the mass market digital products we work on in our day jobs (where accessibility is at the top of the crit list, as it should be).

    2 points
  • Posted to Site Redesign: Pentagram, in reply to Darrell Hanley , Jul 20, 2017

    Hrmmm.

    So I'm usually a strict advocate of making everything accessible to screen readers because its the right thing to do and as a society we need to care about people who have visual impairments or have learning disabilities.

    HOWEVER. This is a traditional branding and graphic design agency. Literally everything they do is visual communication. Putting aside blind people for a moment, I question whether even people who are illiterate or have dyslexia would need a screen reader for this site...the purpose of the site is to showcase the images.

    ...and then there's the biggest group for screen reader usage: the visually impaired. Do you not see the irony in complaining that a showcase of graphic design isn't accessible to blind people?

    The fact that this is the top comment and the fact that you tested a graphic design gallery with a screen reader blows my mind.

    6 points
  • Posted to Dude Calendar. It's a new calendar. For dudes., in reply to Antonia A. , Jul 07, 2017

    Are you gonna be the one to call Curves Gym and let them know they are now being forced to close all of their locations?

    Also how big should the penalty be? Just a repeated fine for every instance (in the case of Curves gym probably a billion plus dollars) or jail time?

    5 points
  • Posted to Dude Calendar. It's a new calendar. For dudes., in reply to Elizabeth R. , Jul 07, 2017

    Guessing this landing page is a troll.

    But on a serious note, do you think we need to ban the marketing of gender specific products? Should I feel left out and upset every time I see Skinnygirl margaritas in the supermarket? I like Margaritas too!

    Even though I struggle to see the value in this product idea, I'm gonna have to play devils advocate here. Are women being underserved by the thousands of existing calendar apps? Is there a gender gap for calendar users that I'm just tone-def to?

    10 points
  • Posted to Is Travis Still CEO?, Jun 17, 2017

    As someone who hasn't followed this, why does everyone hate Kalanick so much?

    I watched the dash cam video in the link above and he does appear to get heated and dickish, but the driver is also coming at him super aggressively. Surely there must be more reason than that?

    1 point
  • Posted to Ask DN: What's your hourly rate?, Jun 15, 2017

    I think you need to ask for "city you work in" for this to have any relevance.

    Rates in SF vs. Budapest vs. Bangalore vs. London are going to be wildly different, not to mention relative currency valuations in these locations.

    2 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: What's your hourly rate?, in reply to Ben Krogh , Jun 15, 2017

    It's entirely dependent on your location and the type of companies you work for.

    For example, in the SF Bay or NYC, $75/hr at any experience level above super entry-level would be too low.

    Ultimately, once you get over 3-5 years of experience, "years of experience" becomes a very poor judge of value and I've found it to have zero relevance in the marketplace. I'd probably place it just above "school you went to" on the bottom of the relevance scale. You shouldn't base your rate on it.

    2 points
  • Posted to Cryptowatch - cryptocurrency charting and trading platform , Jun 09, 2017

    I do dig the minimalist dashboard. However word to the wise--

    I hear lots of people (mostly mid-20s males) around the office talking about "investing" in cryptocurrencies lately as if they know what they are talking about.

    Hopefully none of you are putting serious money into these purely speculative plays. There is no intrinsic value to a cryptocurrency so calling it an "investment" is naive at best. Basically you're gambling with other males in their 20s with a similar knowledge dificiency about things like liquidity, volatility, bid/ask spreads, and the like. You can expect valuations to be a better indication of internet buzz than anything else.

    Somebody above said "XRP is really low now, ideal for safekeeping." This is a perfect illustration of my point.

    0 points
  • Posted to How do you work out how much to estimate?, Jun 03, 2017

    My advice: if you don't ever scare clients away with your pricing, you're grossly undercharging. Everybody wants to get a sweet deal (ie. more than what they're paying for) so if you're not getting any pushback from clients it means you're giving them one.

    Designers striking out on their own initially come with the mentality that, "hey I didn't make much profit on this one, but it's a portfolio piece and I'll make it up on the next one."

    The problem is that a majority of your clients will inevitably come from referral. And when business owners give your studio's name to their business owner friends, the first question the friend will ask is: how much did you pay?

    Therefore, undercharging clients will rarely ever lead to clients willing to pay more than the job you just did. Hence why a majority of studios are so short lived. If you aren't building a war chest of excess profits to protect against a bad year or to fuel future investment or client acquisition, you aren't building a sustainable business.

    3 points
  • Posted to If you’re reading this, you probably don’t do hard work, Jun 03, 2017

    Once lazy knowledge workers have fully automated most if not all manual labor, I wonder what comparisons will be left to melodramatically guilt them into feeling like what they do isn't "virtuous" enough.

    Maybe the 2040 version of this post will read... "Knowledge workers don't do real, hard work...like ...sitting at home living off basic income?"

    1 point
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