Jeff Zych

SF, CA Product Design Manager at Gladly Joined over 4 years ago

  • 23 stories
  • 29 comments
  • 10 upvotes
  • Posted to How do you know if you're being empathetic?, in reply to Jennifer Nguyen , Mar 01, 2019

    Yeah, makes sense, and I absolutely agree. You can understand why someone did something, and still not agree with it. Thanks for sharing!

    0 points
  • Posted to Pay Down Design Debt with Polish Day, in reply to Jansen Tolle , Nov 02, 2016

    Hah yeah good feedback. We actually named the Jira board that we use to track polish issues "Poland" for this reason :)

    0 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: How do you work with development teams as a designer?, Jul 25, 2016

    At Optimizely, engineers are on teams that use a scrum process to manage the work and deliver it to customers. Designers are paired with PMs and work with the engineering scrum teams to ship work, but we manage that work differently from engineering work, since it's a different type of work. We use a discovery process that gives designers and researchers time to understand the problem and explore solutions, before we commit to engineers building it.

    This doesn't dictate the type of work you're doing, but it does set clearer expectations between engineers and PMs about what designers are doing and what the deliverables are.

    I wrote an article about our process here: https://medium.com/design-optimizely/discovery-kanban-at-optimizely-7b3025066d54#.z9qv9ny1p

    2 points
  • Posted to Why Designers Should Code (But Shouldn't Push Code to Production), in reply to Malte Nuhn , Dec 11, 2015

    Yeah, the prod system is another constraint on design.

    0 points
  • Posted to Why Designers Should Code (But Shouldn't Push Code to Production), in reply to Bevan Stephens , Dec 11, 2015

    Yeah when you're the only designer at a company that doesn't have UI engineers then you'll pretty much have to write code. But hopefully you can hire a full time frontend developer soon!

    0 points
  • Posted to Why Designers Should Code (But Shouldn't Push Code to Production), in reply to Jernej Horvat , Dec 11, 2015

    Yeah, exactly.

    0 points
  • Posted to Why Designers Should Code (But Shouldn't Push Code to Production), in reply to Renato de Leão , Dec 11, 2015

    Well put :)

    I didn't intend to be so binary, but I obviously should have put a little more thought into it.

    0 points
  • Posted to Why Designers Should Code (But Shouldn't Push Code to Production), in reply to Alastair Taylor , Dec 11, 2015

    Yeah, I agree with all of this.

    These recommendations are tough because every person and every team is different, hence the backlash against my pithy claim. I meant for that to be a guideline, not a hard and fast rule, but I clearly worded it too strongly :)

    0 points
  • Posted to Why Designers Should Code (But Shouldn't Push Code to Production), in reply to Alastair Taylor , Dec 11, 2015

    A person could be good at both, but they're rare. Building and maintaining a frontend system is a full time responsibility for a person or team when you're building a product that will be around for years and you have teams of engineers and designers and PMs working on it.

    But if a person is doing that, they aren't doing design work.

    And if you're building a personal site or a prototype, then go ahead and design and ship all the code you want.

    1 point
  • Posted to Why Designers Should Code (But Shouldn't Push Code to Production), in reply to Ben Henschel , Dec 11, 2015

    Great question. Like you, I've done a ton of designing in the browser. Sometimes it is the best place to make a design decision. In my experience, this most often applies to really minor things. Flows, layout, colors, etc., are best decided and more quickly iterated on in other places (Sketch, PS, paper, etc.).

    At Optimizely, we've built out a frontend framework for our product that defines common components like buttons, tabs, modals, etc. This means a lot of those really minor decisions that get made in code have already been made. Our product designers can focus on the big problems, like how those low-level components are assembled, what the user flow is, etc. This saves a lot of time for everyone, and makes the UI more consistent.

    And ya, coding is fun :)

    2 points
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