Kyle Peatt

Director of UX at Shopify Joined about 6 years ago

  • 2 stories
  • 8 comments
  • 2 upvotes
  • Posted to Shopify Polaris, in reply to Mattan Ingram , Apr 20, 2017

    Good catch! We'll get that fixed. Thanks!

    5 points
  • Posted to Shopify Polaris, Apr 20, 2017

    Wow! Thanks so much for posting this. I'm so proud of the team that built this. We're really excited to see it make merchant lives better as all of our products — and the apps in our ecosystem — start to adopt it.

    1 point
  • Posted to Up your CSS-Game with Math, Mar 01, 2015

    Rotate trick is cute but I wonder what the advantage is versus just floating the image on every second one right instead. Or if you want to use a neat trick, just using direction to change inline-blocks around. Both would be a whole heck of a lot cheaper render-wise.

    1 point
  • Posted to Carousels: Maybe not so bad after all. We studied 7.5 million carousel interactions over 11 months and posted our research., in reply to James Young , Feb 11, 2015

    Thanks for reading! I think you're right — it's hard to compare the two directly. My goal was to look at the carousel pattern itself to see if it was ineffective. What I found was that there is nothing wrong with the pattern itself — which was surprising seeing how in every article decrying carousels, they attack the whole pattern.

    The language is never couched in "marketing banner carousels" versus "product image gallery carousels". It's just "carousels". I think this research shows that "carousels" can actually be really effective and we can use that knowledge to spend the time designing more effective marketing banner carousels instead of throwing the pattern out wholesale.

    0 points
  • Posted to Carousels: Maybe not so bad after all. We studied 7.5 million carousel interactions over 11 months and posted our research., in reply to Razvan H , Feb 11, 2015

    I wanted to explore whether the underlying pattern was broken or if it was just a problem with marketing banner carousels. I think what this research shows is that the pattern itself is fine — and maybe everyone knew that already. That said, I think marketing carousels can work. They just need to be designed well for their goal.

    0 points
  • Posted to Carousels: Maybe not so bad after all. We studied 7.5 million carousel interactions over 11 months and posted our research., in reply to Sam Pierce Lolla , Feb 11, 2015

    Thanks for the feedback!

    In your research, is there a difference between a carousel and an "image gallery"

    In most of the research I did before writing, a carousel was referred to as something similar to the Kodak Slide Carousel. Usually interchangeable with the term slider. I think probably that auto-advancement has been compounded with carousels these days but it's not a necessary feature to be called a "carousel".

     So just to clarify, this article is not saying homepage carousels are a good idea :)

    I'm also not saying it's a bad idea. I think homepage carousels could probably be very effective if people spent the time to try to design them well. A good example of that is the Amazon marketing banner carousel I linked to in the Considerations section of the article. It very clearly sells the user on why they should click on the next slide by telling them exactly what will be on it.

    Every article out there that was against carousels said that "Carousels are bad". My goal with this article was to say: "Hey! Carousels aren't bad. Just some implementations of them are. They can actually be really engaging if you design them well!"

    0 points
  • Posted to Carousels: Maybe not so bad after all. We studied 7.5 million carousel interactions over 11 months and posted our research., Feb 11, 2015

    Hey guys, I wrote this article — it was a long time coming. We end up using carousels a fair bit in different situations so I wanted to see how they were doing. I'd love to hear your thoughts — good or bad!

    1 point
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