Cover-photo-2015-05-30_03_14_08__0000-53820150530-3-ixam68
Gjermund Gustavsen

Gjermund Gustavsen

Designer at Tight Joined over 4 years ago via an invitation from Mark F. Gjermund has invited Anders Svendal, Atle Mo, August Skare, Johan Høgåsen-Hallesby, Jonas Feiring and 1 other

  • 1 story
  • 14 comments
  • 11 upvotes
  • Posted to Google Product Sans, Sep 03, 2015

    If used with the single-story 'a', I'd say Sofia is pretty similar. Perhaps also Scandia.

    0 points
  • Posted to How quitting my corporate job for my startup dream f*cked my life up, Sep 12, 2014

    This guy didn't want to start his own thing. He just wanted to quit his job.

    3 points
  • Posted to Armature - Create wireframes directly in Adobe Illustrator, Sep 08, 2014

    Anyone has experience with this? Is it possible to replace components with your own?

    0 points
  • Posted to I rarely see frontend devs use pure SASS...why?, in reply to César Migueláñez , May 20, 2014

    I felt that way in the beginning too, but after a while of forcing myself to stick with it, I now find it easier to read/scan original .sass than traditional css. It is cleaner and saves you a lot of typing.

    0 points
  • Posted to How do you clock in your freelance hours?, in reply to Dmitri Litvinov , Nov 30, 2013

    Okay, gotcha :)

    If the client wants to have everything on an hourly basis, there's always an upper limit involved. I suggest finding that upper limit and agreeing on a fixed "max price". Then you're able to establish a budget of hours for yourself, and can treat it pretty much like you're used to. In this scenario, logging hours is essential to keep the budget from blowing up.

    If you can't get hold of a max price and the client seem to not care about the price, you're in a pretty lucrative position. Still, make sure you document how you spend your time, so you have your own back in case there's a future disagreement. We got sick of homegrown spreadsheets and made our own tool, but each to their own.

    0 points
  • Posted to How do you clock in your freelance hours?, in reply to Daniel De Laney , Nov 30, 2013

    It's not about spending fewer hours or working slower: It's about knowing how much time something takes, so you can price yourself accordingly. No guesswork. It's too easy to give clients the benefit of the doubt if a project takes longer than planned, and you didn't log your hours.

    To me, the concept of paying for someone's time makes total sense. If your time is sought-after, you can raise the hourly price. Working 'slower' or lying about your time is probably not gonna be a viable strategy in the long run.

    0 points
  • Posted to How do you clock in your freelance hours?, Nov 30, 2013

    We're a team of two – designer & developer – that have made our own time tracking tool called Ding. It's a dead simple approach, focusing only on the time you put in and the money you make. Give it a try and let me know what you think: http://ding.io

    4 points
  • Posted to Show DN: Ding — time tracking for freelancers & small teams, in reply to Sacha Greif , Nov 07, 2013

    Well, we believed we could make a product that's better and more focused than the others out there — especially for freelancers and teams of our size (two). That kind of ambition, paired with execution, is always welcome in my book.

    More and more people are able to go freelance with just a laptop and a bright mind these days, so I'd be happy to see people making better tools aimed at these guys.

    0 points
  • Posted to Show DN: Ding — time tracking for freelancers & small teams, in reply to Falko Joseph , Nov 07, 2013

    Thanks! Hope you'll find it useful

    0 points
  • Posted to Show DN: Ding — time tracking for freelancers & small teams, in reply to Thomas Bjerring , Nov 06, 2013

    Sign up and send me an email at gjermund@ding.io, and I'll hook you up with an extended trial. And for anyone else reading this – you're welcome to do the same :)

    2 points
Load more comments