Cover-photo-2015-05-30_03_13_02__0000-30520150530-3-pxt03x
Marc Edwards

Marc Edwards

Community Staff Founder at Bjango Joined over 6 years ago via an invitation from Christophe T. Marc has invited Matt Kelsh, Rene Ritchie, Dan V Peterson, Troy Mcilvena, Graham Clarke and 12 others

  • 503 stories
  • 2260 comments
  • 1094 upvotes
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, in reply to Matthew O'Connor , Jul 18, 2019

    I hadn’t run the app for ages. A few seconds after I launched it, an email from InVision landed in my email inbox (I can’t remember exactly what it said). I assume this means they’re tracking launches and other usage, sending that data to their servers, and triggering emails and other things based on events. Other companies have done worse, but I’m getting pretty tired of privacy violations. I just don’t need that stuff in my life.

    1 point
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, in reply to Liam Stanley , Jul 18, 2019

    I uninstalled it after I caught it doing something I found a bit… not nice. If I get a chance I’ll give it a test though.

    2 points
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, in reply to Dustin Dahlberg , Jul 18, 2019

    I think the bad news is that you should buy what you can afford, and that’ll change depending on your situation.

    My main take away is if you use Figma, getting a dedicated GPU MacBook Pro is probably worth it. If you use other tools, it’s probably not worth it.

    If you use Sketch, Photoshop or Affinity Designer, getting more CPU cores is probably worth it. Don’t bother with the dedicated GPU though.

    As for memory… 16GB is probably fine. 32GB is nice. More than 32GB probably isn’t worth it for product design work (and not possible on Mac laptops anyway).

    1 point
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, in reply to Tejas Bhalerao , Jul 18, 2019

    I think that’s great news. Figma is using WebGL for most or all rendering, which means graphics are drawn on the GPU. GPUs are incredibly quick at rendering graphics, and they’re better suited to the task than CPUs. Sketch uses Core Graphics to draw shapes, and Core Graphics does it’s rendering predominately or entirely on the CPU. There’s quality benefits in the strategy Core Graphics uses, but I think Figma’s results are what I would be looking for in a well made design tool.

    In this test, if either the CPU or GPU graphs aren’t being pegged, that’s a sign that there’s a lot more headroom for improvement, and that there is likely stalling or mutex issues that are slowing the tool down.

    XD’s graphs are especially interesting — XD is fast, but there’s a lot of CPU and GPU not being used. That leads me to think it could be a lot quicker.

    0 points
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, in reply to Steve O'Connor , Jul 18, 2019

    Not a problem at all. More coming. :D

    2 points
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, in reply to David Thorn , Jul 18, 2019

    All the tests were conducted from a fresh launch of the app, on an iMac Pro (the base model, 8-core, Radeon Pro Vega 56 with 8GB). Hyper-threading is shown in the CPU graphs, which is why there’s 16 cores.

    1 point
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, in reply to Devin Fountain , Jul 18, 2019

    The test was made using the desktop version of the app. I haven’t checked using Figma running in Chrome, but I would assume the results should be very similar, given the desktop Figma app uses Electron/Chromium, and I believe it runs identical code to the browser version (WebAssembly and WebGL). I should test to confirm that though.

    1 point
  • Posted to Which Mac is the best for product design?, in reply to Mac Peterson , Jul 18, 2019

    If the other apps are idle, I don’t think it’ll influence the results too much. The tests were done on an iMac Pro, and when I wasn’t pushing the tool in question, the graphs were as close to zero as you’d expect (just bits of noise as background stuff fires up and finishes).

    0 points
  • Posted to Testing for wide gamut, in reply to Zach Johnston , Jul 16, 2019

    Thanks! You’re not missing anything. :)

    Yeah, Display P3 support on the web via CSS isn’t in a state where you can rely on it. It’s easy to create a fallback sRGB colour, but if you really want a colour to be Display P3, using an image is the most reliable option (colour spaces in PNGs have really good support across all modern browsers).

    That’s part of my motivation in writing the article and creating the action — colours that fall within sRGB can just use normal CSS colours, and things that fall outside sRGB can be special cased using a variety of available techniques.

    Exporting an image with a proper Display P3 profile is a bit tricky. As far as I’m aware, Photoshop, Affinity Designer, Affinity Photo and a few other apps can do it. I do not think Sketch and Figma can.

    1 point
  • Posted to Dropbox Desktop App, in reply to John P , Jul 08, 2019

    The new app is even worse with resources. I now leave it paused and just unpause to sync.

    1 point
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