29 comments

  • Robert BulloughRobert Bullough, 1 year ago

    lmao- this is hilarious

    10 points
  • James Young, 1 year ago

    I found this really funny. I look at a lot of portfolios and they do have a certain amount of sameness. I think a lot of people need to find a sense of humor and quit taking everything so serious. How can you be creative when you're so burdened by what some other person says/does?

    I haven't touched mine in 3 years - in fact, it was never finished because there's too much day to day work to do. I suppose if I wasn't busy reading DN I'd have time to complete it. I'm surprised she doesn't have generic WordPress template as a box (guilty ). I did manage to get out pretty unscathed but not due to any effort I could have easily replicated any of her bingo boxes.

    3 points
  • Weston VierreggerWeston Vierregger, 1 year ago

    top left square is basically a free space

    3 points
  • Joe CJoe C, 1 year ago

    What do people here think of the differing viewpoints shown in the replies to this?

    • This is an unnecessary takedown of people who are trying to come across as genuine. Young designers seeing this may feel pretty terrible about themselves if they have several of the squares. -vs-
    • This is funny, a light-hearted poke at an industry that often converges on the same trends and cliches.

    I'm not sure how I feel. I have a few of the squares on my portfolio and it kind of hurt and made me feel ashamed. Maybe this is good and means I need to spend more time thinking of creative solutions rather than defaulting to what I've seen done successfully.

    Or...maybe the smugness of this kind of "these things are wrong" post is just kindling to the fire that is imposter syndrome for a lot of people.

    I'm interested to hear what other people think about it.

    1 point
    • G Lukacs, 1 year ago

      I think you have to look at who the post aims at. It could be considered light-hearted, but it's not usually funny to "poke down".

      For me, this comes across as a relatively senior designer making fun of newer, less experienced people. Also, bear in mind that the person who posted this could have easily included some "redundant" features of her own portfolio, like "letters in logo reversed for no reason", or given that her matrix has a square labeled "also has a photography section", she could have maybe referenced the fact that she feels compelled to tell everyone that she "likes camping, volunteering and museums."

      I don't know, I don't mind personally. I'm not one for getting upset at things people say on the internet. But it seems to me that her post is lacking some of the "self-deprecating" stuff that makes most humour palatable.

      With regard to what you said before:

      "I have a few of the squares on my portfolio and it kind of hurt and made me feel ashamed."

      That is shit. I'm sorry. Don't be disheartened though, there are thousands of successful design people who have some of these squares in their portfolio. Remember, design ≠ art. A portfolio site, by its very nature, is an advertisement. I think people in the design community make this mistake often. Are we trying to impress other designers, or people that might hire us? Are those two things the same?

      We hold the most "creative" people up high, but then criticise young designers for making "usability mistakes". Which one is it? Creativity or adhering to shared standards? I don't want to get into this too deep, but you get the idea. The person who made this post is criticising designers for a perceived "lack of creativity" but at the same time, would be immediately prepared to criticise a portfolio that is "too creative" for not adhering to the standards we share.

      I think the design community loves to criticise. They'll say go left. Then you might go left. Next thing you know, they're saying you've gone too far left. This is because design people have a built-in compulsion to look for ways to improve things, but that's another story for another post. They mean well. Remember that.

      Here's the thing. You aren't always trying to impress jaded designers. Sometimes it's CEOs, CTOs, HR people, recruiters, whomever. It's more important to be a person that people want to be around. An articulate, friendly, helpful person. That will get you more work than any portfolio could. Your post seems to indicate that you're a thoughtful person. Don't worry about it too much.

      Her post is what it is, a quick, low-effort, ultimately harmless, bit of fun. If you're choosing to look at it as more than that, then I'd probably suggest not doing that!

      Hope you're doing well.

      5 points
      • Joe CJoe C, 1 year ago

        Hey, thanks for the kind comments. I agree with you, and I think some of feeling that pang of hurt/shame/embarrassment is just part of being a designer, which is sort of a unique occupation wherein we “advertise” ourselves as well as our services.

        I think it would be wise for me to internalise a lot of what you wrote. I think with some more self-confidence I’d be able to laugh it off, which is probably how it was intended.

        I really appreciate your message, thanks.

        0 points
    • Tom CTom C, 1 year ago

      Imho, this is funny, a light-hearted poke at an industry that often converges on the same trends and cliches. I can't imagine people are actually being hurt/offended by any of the squares. You need a thicker skin :)

      It boils down to the fact that a portfolio should be professional, think of it - you're trying to sell yourself, are you doing it with cheap emoji? Also, nobody cares about your photography or other hobbies, they need your skills and experience, because they are serious and want to pay you money for your work. If they like you, you will have an interview where you will have a chance for a small talk..

      It is your work that should be shaping your portfolio and showing off your skillset. It should not be your portfolio shaping up thumbnails of your work.

      2 points
    • Account deleted 1 year ago

      "I have a few of the squares on my portfolio and it kind of hurt and made me feel ashamed."

      Dude, it's a joke. Basically everyone has one of them on their portfolio. There's nothing wrong with it.

      0 points
      • Joe CJoe C, 1 year ago

        Yeah, I understood that it was a joke. I was just being honest about how I reacted to it, I thought that in itself was interesting and wondered how others felt. I would have much rather reacted another way, and that’s for me to work on.

        But please don’t misunderstand me, I don’t think this kind of thing should be censored/taken down etc.

        2 points
        • Account deleted 1 year ago

          Ah got it. Just try not to worry about it. Almost everything has been done in visual design so it's hard not to be vacuumed up into something like this.

          0 points
  • Lee Beckwith, 1 year ago

    So funny how people are offended by this.

    1 point
  • Scott ThomasScott Thomas, 1 year ago

    I don't think I ever saw a custom cursor.... at least not since 2006-7.

    I'm surprised there isn't one saying... "I'm still working on it".. cause that would be me for the past 3 years.

    0 points
    • Account deleted 1 year ago

      The brutalists are trying bringing it back lol. I've seen heaps of coloured circles or giant arrows.

      0 points
  • Zoltán Várkonyi, 1 year ago

    Missing: Working with retina display, so have never checked how unreadable her serif typo on an average screen...

    0 points
  • Tom WoodTom Wood, 1 year ago

    Hilarious...

    Satire like this just comes across as bitter. Compare this to the satire of Pablo Stanley: Pablo is poking fun at all of us, but it's clearly from the heart and it feels inclusive.

    This is the complete opposite.

    0 points
    • Steven CavinsSteven Cavins, 1 year ago

      This is a dichotomy I'm cool with. If you want to take the good, you have to take the bad. I'm kinda shocked but not shocked that people are grumbling about this. Also, I'm upvoting you because it's unfair you're getting downvoted for having an opinion, which kinda makes my point.

      1 point
  • Thomas Michael SemmlerThomas Michael Semmler, 1 year ago

    It's funny because it's true

    0 points
  • Oliver Swig, 1 year ago

    The product designer hivemind is imploding about this. At least graphic designers try to be different than one another rather than follow design patterns just because. The product design community needs more calling out, you guys are borinnggggggg.

    -1 points
    • David ThornDavid Thorn, 1 year ago

      Uh, I don't think you know many graphic designers then... Just as guilty at following trends ad nauseam.

      1 point
      • Oliver Swig, 1 year ago

        nahhh bro graphic designers create culture and trends, product designers bite them then bite each other.

        -1 points
    • Joe CJoe C, 1 year ago

      I guess that could be down to graphic design being generally more expressive. In my experience, a brief for a graphic design project has a much wider range of possible directions. Maybe the client wants to look "regal, underground, fierce, alive" or something that involves the potential for more subjective expression, or at least the possibility to go off in different directions. Whereas a product design brief is much more likely to be similar; "easy to use, intuitive, trustworthy" etc. I feel like there is much less chance to be expressive designing for product, so I guess that rubs off on the people doing that kind of work.

      Personally I think it would be cool, as an example, to see some Carson/Ray Gun take on any of the homogeneous blank/shadowed/clean popular app UI's, but I can't imagine it ever aligning with the business goals driving product design right now. Maybe once the market saturates fully they'll be some divergence as products try to stand out, but I'm not sure that'll happen in a visual way.

      1 point
  • Account deleted 1 year ago

    Haha. Nice. I have none of them on mine, and I'm glad someone is calling out using Emjoi in their introduction. It looks horrible.

    -3 points
    • Brandon ZellBrandon Zell, 1 year ago

      And yet your portfolio's page title is just the fire emoji? lol I think they're fine... just depends how you want to come across.

      Btw - I'm not sure if you favicon is supposed to be something, but it looks blank.

      2 points
      • Account deleted 1 year ago

        Yeah. It doesnt effect the hierarchy on the page having it up there, and yep the favicon is a transparent png - its meant to be blank. If you go to the projects you get more fire emjois.

        -1 points
        • Brandon ZellBrandon Zell, 1 year ago

          Alright, though I'm not sure how an emoji in the intro inherently messes up the hierarchy.

          You should make the favican look like the fire emoji to avoid that blank space where the favicon is. Right now I see a big blank space, and then one and a half fire emoji. Although the spacing would probably be off... (sigh) Anyway, here's what I see right now:

          fire

          2 points
          • Account deleted 1 year ago

            What I mean by that is people often have super minimal sites with a white or black background and a clean san serif font, then they have a giant waving hand emoji in their intro text which throws off the visual balance of the page. People put them in there because it is a fad without thinking of the design behind it, and it makes the page look bad.

            Yeah I thought of that and having the little space there. I like it better without the favicon to be honest. It works when you have full size tabs (your ones a pretty small there) and it's more of an easter egg than anything.

            -3 points
            • Brandon ZellBrandon Zell, 1 year ago

              Ok, I hear ya. I think some people add them purposefully for that splash of color and fun in the midst of their minimal design, but sure, there are some that probably add it more thoughtlessly simply because it's a fad.

              Haha, my tabs are almost always this small, and usually smaller, but I understand that's probably not true for most of your site visitors. I like the one flame on the homepage and multiple flames on project pages. Wish I had the tab space to appreciate it!

              Kudos on coding your site. Looks nice.

              2 points
              • Account deleted 1 year ago

                Haha thanks man. I'm sure some front end guys will be disgusted at my coding ability (or lack thereof) haha.

                -1 points