7 comments

  • Luke JonesLuke Jones, almost 2 years ago

    I’ve been a designer for over a decade now and have worked remote since 2015. The freedom of working remote brings challenges around collaboration and critique that don't exist when working side-by-side in an office.

    This post is a summary of what I think are the key habits and techniques to making critique work when remote.

    Hit me up if you have any thoughts, if you want me to clarify anything, or if you've found an issue with the post I need to fix!

    Thanks :-)

    4 points
    • Weston Thayer, almost 2 years ago

      Definitely fits in with my experience, nice work! Have you tried out async critiques at all?

      1 point
      • Luke JonesLuke Jones, almost 2 years ago

        What's an async critique?

        1 point
        • Weston Thayer, almost 2 years ago

          It's when you get feedback on a design asynchronously, not in real-time. For example, you might email a Google Doc to someone asking for their thoughts. They can comment when they have time, on their own schedule. I've done this with InVision, where people can add comments over a few day span.

          0 points
          • Luke JonesLuke Jones, almost 2 years ago

            Ah, no this is something I actively avoid doing. I prefer critique to happen as part of a conversation and decisions to be made at the time. If someone isn't in that meeting, then that's just unfortunate.

            0 points
    • Rob Millington, almost 2 years ago

      All good valid points. Setting the context and being in the right frame of mind to take feedback is very important. Nothing like be sniped with some comments when you are not prepared for it :D

      I manage a design team of around 15-20 (depending on who you count) and we are spread out over 5 locations.

      For us (or me) the initial challenge was creating a culture where we could share and getting to know each other. Historically the team had been silo'd into project teams and get moved onto new projects semi-frequently.

      So in the first instance we setup a weekly show & tell. We get around the team to see what is going on with one major presentation and a quick fire of what everyone else is up-to. If anyone is in a critical stage we extend the session to deep dive. After about 6 months we are seeing some great benefits. The Slack channel is now buzzing with 'what do you think of this' compared to tumble weed before.

      0 points