19 comments

  • Mick NMick N, 1 year ago

    Weird list here. Why are we still talking about Comic Sans? Who cares, it has been done to death already.

    My biggest gripe of 2018—and it has been a gripe for years preceding as well—is interrupting the expected use of scroll. So scroll-jacking, reversing scroll, horizontal scroll… whatever it is. If it messes with the expected action of scrolling then I already hate your website.

    15 points
  • D Dot, 1 year ago

    So tired of hearing about the hamburger icon. Its here to stay, get over it. BTW, Facebook didn't get rid of the hb icon in the example, they just moved it to the tab bar.

    13 points
  • Clarissa H., 1 year ago

    I don't understand this writer's position against the hamburger button. They never really articulated an argument against it.

    I feel like Uber's use of a hamburger menu is warranted. The hierarchy of the app makes sense for my use of Uber. The main thing I want to do is request a ride. It's front and center on the home screen. Everything else is accessible via the hamburger menu.

    Would be curious to see what others think about this.

    5 points
  • Dirk HCM van BoxtelDirk HCM van Boxtel, 1 year ago

    Hamburger icon: learnable

    Comic sans: get over yourself, it's areadable font

    Norman's door: learnable

    Fake preloaders: cost time

    Inifinite scroll: cost time and break UI as it means you're never sure of where something is and you can't link to stuff anymore

    Easy win for infinite scroll being the worst.

    5 points
    • Alejandro DorantesAlejandro Dorantes, 1 year ago

      Hamburger Icon : Learnable, predictable

      Comic Sans: Whatever

      Normans Door: Learnable, unpredictable

      Fake Preloader: Predictable

      Infinite Scroll: Predictable

      The main thing to communicate trust is to allow the user to foresee what is going to happen.

      Walking late at 10m/s into an office you've never been into just to arrive at the meeting with a sore forehead is not exactly foreseeable

      I talk from experience

      1 point
      • Dirk HCM van BoxtelDirk HCM van Boxtel, 1 year ago

        The main thing to communicate trust is to allow the user to foresee what is going to happen.

        Not always. When an interface element gets used 100x per day, usability doesn't always equal "predicatability", hence "learnable". It's more about having the features there, so you can get away with imperfect predictability.

        Inifinite scroll can cause huge usability issues where you can't link to a specific portions of it. You can't bookmark a section. You can't always easily scroll to that portion either. You also won't be looking at the same thing as someone else. Etc.

        I talk from experience

        ... alllllrighty then.

        0 points
        • Andrew C, 1 year ago

          The stats on hamburger menus are pretty clear about it being low on learnsbility. Still a useful pattern to hide overstuffed features and taxonomy though.

          0 points
          • Dirk HCM van BoxtelDirk HCM van Boxtel, 1 year ago

            Recognisability yes, learnability is different.

            0 points
            • Andrew C, 1 year ago

              Learnability is easy to measure in a usability test — have the user repeat a task after a modest break and distraction. Hamburgers don’t improve this from the stats presented.

              But like I said we have to establish hierarchy somehow. Hamburgers help w that.

              0 points
    • Kyle D, 1 year ago

      Agreed 100%.

      Though I would argue that Norman's door also costs time. But Infinite Scroll has erased millennia of human productivity and happiness.

      1 point
  • A B, 1 year ago

    GDPR cookie agreement popups. Especially with a faux close icon.

    Really, is there any contest here?

    2 points
    • James LaneJames Lane, 1 year ago

      They're needed by law though aren't they?

      0 points
      • Andrew C, 1 year ago

        Needed by law doesn’t undo the fact that I don’t want to click a cookie acceptance notice to read every article I visit. Clearly the work of bureaucrats and lawyers.

        This def gets my vote.

        1 point
        • James LaneJames Lane, 1 year ago

          As I've said to A B below, I don't like them either. But it is a law designed for a reason. I think they could have gone about it a better way, but that's just not the way life is.

          0 points
      • A B, 1 year ago

        Dark UX patterns at work here. Just a few common observations:

        • No formal option to opt-out
        • Close icons that don't work
        • Obtrusive overlays that deliberately obscure content forcing the user to opt-in

        Struggling to see how this has benefitted the user, by introducing a formality of clicking "yes" and hence an extra layer of friction.

        0 points
        • James LaneJames Lane, 1 year ago

          I should have probably elaborated in the fact that I also don't agree with them. I think you're right about 'the extra layer of friction'.

          0 points
          • Andrew C, 1 year ago

            Yea I think your point is it’s forced by law. But we’re solely discussing its usefulness from a user perspective. It’s def a valid nomination for annoying 2018 pattern in spite of the law.

            1 point
  • Hannah ChalmersHannah Chalmers, 1 year ago

    I'm definitely over the Comic Sans argument, I think there can actually be a time and a place for it.

    From that list I think infinite scroll bugs me most, especially when I'm shopping online and the list of products just never seems to end!

    2 points
  • Dan OC, 1 year ago

    The articles opinion about 'fake' preloaders are a load of rubbish.

    It is much better to tell the user that something is happening, rather than just leave an empty space giving zero feedback.

    Yes, usually poor performance is the cause of such things, but it can also be that the user just has a slow internet connection.

    0 points