16 comments

  • Cristian MoiseiCristian Moisei, 7 months ago

    This looks like a good idea. Let’s see how it goes.

    23 points
  • michael vottonk, 7 months ago

    It look's like a Dev Tools for designers, really cool idea congrats!! looking forward to give it a try

    13 points
  • Philip A, 7 months ago

    This looks amazing!!!

    8 points
  • Mathieu CMathieu C, 7 months ago

    Dreamweaver, is that you?

    8 points
  • Marc Olivier LapierreMarc Olivier Lapierre, 7 months ago

    This awesome. Can't wait to start playing with it!

    7 points
  • Danny Lai, 7 months ago

    Did anyone else read this as Hardon and think it is a strange name for a design tool?

    6 points
  • Aaron Wears Many HatsAaron Wears Many Hats, 7 months ago

    https://xkcd.com/927/

    6 points
  • Johannes Neumeier, 7 months ago

    I think we so frequent calls for designers to "learn to code" this could be a nice way to start out visually but still keep fostering that connection to actual css markup. Bravo for lowering that threshold some.

    1 point
  • Shreya SaxenaShreya Saxena, 7 months ago

    Woah! So this is great for developing responsive websites. It would definitely bring designers' and developers close as to understand how their designs are translated. I also think Hadron is better than Anima. Excited to see how it unfolds.

    1 point
  • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, 7 months ago

    This is the direction we need to go with tooling, although it will be great if it isn't tied to only Polymer. It seems like their "engines" concept might allow for using Vue or React in the future.

    0 points
    • , 7 months ago

      It's not tied to Polymer, we have built it so it's easy to add any other library. We'll add Vue and React in the future although with no ETA right now.

      The good thing about Polymer, and it's the reason we started with it, is that's just a tiny library that helps to build Web Components, which is native to the Web. And Web Components are great for Hadron because they encapsulate styles, HTML and JS, so your styles won't collide between elements.

      13 points
  • Mike StevensonMike Stevenson, 7 months ago

    Honest question: Why would I use this over a very robust and functional tool such as Webflow?

    0 points
    • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, 7 months ago

      It looks like this might provide a slightly closer to the code experience than Webflow does just judging by product screenshots.

      0 points
      • Mike StevensonMike Stevenson, 7 months ago

        Yeah I can see that. But to really use Webflow well you still should know some CSS so you can manipulate your designs properly. I just don't really see the need to watch the live code output as it's generated.

        There's also Pinegrow, which I think does the same thing that Hadron is promoting. It's also cool because it supports frameworks like Bootstrap out of the box.

        I'm all for new tools that make our jobs easier and more efficient. I'm just wondering what this one does that would make it compelling to use versus other options or just hand coding a site.

        1 point
        • , 7 months ago

          Hello Mike! thank you for taking the time to question those things!

          The point of Hadron is not seeing how the code output is being generated, but to help you generate it yourself. A way to see it is that we simplify development so much in making it visual that it can be used for designing too.

          This is a different approach from Webflow which is more like mocking the Web Platform (CSS & HTML) in a complex UI that makes it easy for them to transform it into a web of their choice behind the scenes.

          One example: Hadron lets you pick up a library or framework of your choice (currently only Polymer 2) and you can explore, modify and export the whole project. Whereas WebFlow only lets you export to an auto-generated web they control, in which they choose the dependencies (like a webflow library or jquery I think). And it's only for paid accounts.

          11 points