45 comments

  • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, over 1 year ago

    my favorite part of design job titles is that every organization defines them completely differently and it's impossible to tell what anyone actually does.

    25 points
    • Ben GiffordBen Gifford, over 1 year ago

      … and many use progressive titles as a honeypot to lure people in to thinking they have a real design organization and support.

      "Product designer at top startup." Then you read the job description, and it looks eerily similar to a marketing landing page designer job description for some advertising agency you passed over in 2004.

      6 points
  • Rhys MerrittRhys Merritt, over 1 year ago

    Low hanging fruit. Trash article made entirely to spark up a heated conversation and get clicks so that designers on here might sign up as a Freelancer.

    UI is a part of UX - not every designer focuses on the entire user experience. Some designers are UI designers. Let's just all agree that titles in the design world are ridiculous, and almost meaningless due to the fact that just about every company considers 'UX' to be something entirely different.

    The link Hüseyin Yilmaz posted is good.

    19 points
    • Sylvain MarettoSylvain Maretto, over 1 year ago

      On spot Rhys. I read an article lately, possibly here on DN, saying that the real problem in the industry was UI/UX designer, which attaches the role of UX to the screens (the UI) when UX should be a company wide problem: services, business, organisational structure... This job title infantilises the whole design industry right now...

      1 point
  • Miklos Philips, over 1 year ago

    oooh, controversial!

    16 points
  • Jared KrauseJared Krause, over 1 year ago

    IT'S 2018 HOW ARE WE STILL DISCUSSING THIS

    12 points
  • Andrew C, over 1 year ago

    UI Designer is probably one of the clearest titles we have in the title dumpster fire our industry has created for itself.

    7 points
  • Abhishek SureshAbhishek Suresh, over 1 year ago

    Haha. Guess what I found: https://uxdesign.cc/why-no-one-should-be-called-a-ux-designer-71226f4d9cd1

    6 points
  • Steven CavinsSteven Cavins, over 1 year ago

    All I know is, your Linkedin recruiter spam will diminish if you say UI Designer. No one knows what that means, apparently.

    6 points
  • Roman PohoreckiRoman Pohorecki, over 1 year ago

    How about simplifying all the dang titles : designer, manager, programmer, partner...

    4 points
    • Daniel Schwarz, over 1 year ago

      So then how would you distinguish between a UX designer and an interior designer?

      I guess sometimes it depends on the context. When my family asks what I do, I just say "I make websites."

      3 points
      • John PJohn P, over 1 year ago

        So then how would you distinguish between a UX designer and an interior designer?

        Didn't seem to bother anyone when we started calling "UI Designers" "Product Designers" when Product Design is already an entirely different field

        1 point
      • Wouter RamakerWouter Ramaker, over 1 year ago

        So then how would you distinguish between a UX designer and an interior designer?

        Do interiors have users that have an experience in them?

        1 point
      • Omer BalyaliOmer Balyali, over 1 year ago

        @Daniel Schwarz:

        So only UX Designers care about the people? They are the only people who get feedback?

        Because designers are decorators, in your mentality... (until they become UX Designers)

        Look you even know that you have to say what you're designing. Can you show me some experiences that is designed? I guess not, it's not tangible, hence can not be designed. But designed for...

        0 points
  • Hüseyin YilmazHüseyin Yilmaz, over 1 year ago

    UI is UX? Really? https://uxdesign.cc/the-spectrum-of-digital-design-roles-in-2018-3286390a9966

    4 points
    • Interested Curious, over 1 year ago

      that article, has a person with a joke title thats more commentary on unreasonable requests (unicorn) as having less responsibilities than an actual role. and even the explanation in the comments misses the reason its called unicorn.

      0 points
  • Des DevDes Dev, over 1 year ago

    My father was an architect for 30 years of his career.

    I've been in this industry for less than 10 years, and my title changed from Graphic designer to Web designer to Digital designer to UI designer to UI/UX designer to Product designer. And I've been doing pretty much the same thing. (Some people will argue that what we do has been CHANGING A LOT, but other professions change as well, they just don't change their title every time)

    3 points
    • Omer BalyaliOmer Balyali, over 1 year ago

      Architect... who designs residential or commercial buildings, where people are interacting with each other and having experiences, or let's say in total where they live. So why we don't call them UX Designers too, or better Life Designers? And if we will call them UX Designers too, then all UX Designers should have to be able to design both buildings, mobile apps, websites etc. Because why not, UX Design is a umbrella-term, wink wink ;)

      0 points
      • Daniel Schwarz, over 1 year ago

        I totally think web designer or app designer is the perfect way to describe oneself. If I can get my parents to understand what I do, I say mission accomplished. UI implies visuals, UX implies everything (including architects as you say), but web designer/app designer explains exactly what I do.

        0 points
        • Omer BalyaliOmer Balyali, over 1 year ago

          How UI implies visuals?

          User-Interface... and there are voice interfaces, so there is no colors or rounded corners. And if they don't really care about the experience the user will have, then why it's called User-Interface Designer?

          There is User-Experience but there is no User-Experience Designer, because you don't and can't design the experience, it's not that simple. You design for the experience, you design your product/interface/website/app and HOPE FOR THE BEST.

          Food for thought: If I bought a ticket via phone from an airline company, this is "the interface" between me and the company, where we can Interact AND they make me wait for half an hour and they reserved the wrong flight, because of human error on their side. Then after 23 phone calls, they send me an email with a link to App Store to download their mobile app. (Because they have "the best experience" in the mobile app) And after I downloaded the app, I have to login with my credentials, but it's not enough, so I go and confirm the access data from my email inbox. Then... at last I can navigate reaaaalllly smoothly to the related action and complete my task. (Let's assume there is no errors on the app) According to you, the user must have a really good experience.

          So you say now that as a "UX Designer" you can control all of this process. Can you really expect people to have THE EXACT EXPERIENCE YOU DESIGNED?

          If not, you're not designing the experience.

          0 points
  • Tony GinesTony Gines, over 1 year ago

    I call myself a UXI Designer

    ... no I don't, but not a bad idea.

    3 points
  • Dean HaydenDean Hayden, over 1 year ago

    You could argue that any role is part of the user experience and as such everyone should have UX as part of their job title.

    The title UI Designer is fine, the title of UX Designer is fine. They are both roles that have clearly defined skillsets, some overlap and some don't.

    I'm also a big advocate of ignoring what I "should" or "shouldn't" do.

    2 points
    • Omer BalyaliOmer Balyali, over 1 year ago

      Uhmm... what are the things that differentiate "UX Designer" from a UI Designer? (that don't overlap?)

      0 points
      • Dean HaydenDean Hayden, over 1 year ago

        A UI Designer may not think about functional copy the same way a UX Designer would.

        A UX Designer would consider the order of content content whereas a UI Designer would think about the layout.

        A UX Designer would make typography recommendations based on usability whereas a UI Designer would consider character, tone and brand.

        A UX Designer would advise on copy length and ease of digestion whereas a UI Designer will think about visual rhythm and interest.

        I could go on but hopefully this illustrates the point.

        1 point
        • Omer BalyaliOmer Balyali, over 1 year ago

          I think you're confusing the "Visual Designer" with "User-Interface Designer". User-Interface Designer cares all of this points because User-Interface Designer designs for a good/smooth User-Experience. Visual Designer is what you're trying to say.

          Just look at Wikipedia for User-Interface Design:

          User interface design (UI) or user interface engineering is the design of user interfaces for machines and software, such as computers, home appliances, mobile devices, and other electronic devices, with the focus on maximizing usability and the user experience. The goal of user interface design is to make the user's interaction as simple and efficient as possible, in terms of accomplishing user goals (user-centered design).

          Good user interface design facilitates finishing the task at hand without drawing unnecessary attention to itself. Graphic design and typography are utilized to support its usability, influencing how the user performs certain interactions and improving the aesthetic appeal of the design; design aesthetics may enhance or detract from the ability of users to use the functions of the interface.[1] The design process must balance technical functionality and visual elements (e.g., mental model) to create a system that is not only operational but also usable and adaptable to changing user needs.

          Interface design is involved in a wide range of projects from computer systems, to cars, to commercial planes; all of these projects involve much of the same basic human interactions yet also require some unique skills and knowledge. As a result, designers tend to specialize in certain types of projects and have skills centered on their expertise, whether that be software design, user research, web design, or industrial design.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_interface_design

          0 points
    • Adam Fisher-CoxAdam Fisher-Cox, over 1 year ago

      Yes. Everyone who touches the product is influencing the person's experience. In addition there are a to of things about a user's experience that we can't control. YOU CANNOT DESIGN AN EXPERIENCE. You can design the interface. UX is a dumb concept. This is a losing fight, but boy do I fight it.

      0 points
  • Darren H., over 1 year ago

    I've called myself "a web designer" for nearly 20 years in the industry and not once in any job in any context has someone asked me to clarify or change it or suggested it mattered to any of the work I do.

    1 point
    • Account deleted over 1 year ago

      I used to call myself that then realised I could make 100 pounds more each day if I changed it to UX/UI (or whatever was 'in') designer, so I did.

      4 points
  • Scott ThomasScott Thomas, over 1 year ago

    To be honest... your title should be "I'm a web designer that specializes in X....

    It is ironic that UX designers are "for the user"... but we use vague career titles and acronyms, which the common users doesn't know.... and neither we. :-D

    1 point
  • Stuart McCoyStuart McCoy, over 1 year ago

    I never started in the first place. I'm a graphic designer. Period. If HR and marketeers are too stupid to know what that is, I don't want to work there. Granted, I also started designing and developing with Netscape Navigator 0.9b so I'm probably allergic to change at this point.

    1 point
  • Dirk HCM van BoxtelDirk HCM van Boxtel, over 1 year ago

    Yeah but SHOULD WE CODE!?!? Can SOMEONE PLEASE ANSWER!

    1 point
  • Razlan HanafiahRazlan Hanafiah, over 1 year ago

    True. By the way I'm a chef. I "cook up" intuitive and beautiful user interface

    1 point
  • brian sheridan, over 1 year ago

    I think it is important to keep the divide between UI design and UX research. The same person could perform the two functions in a small company but if you have extra resources it should be two different people. It is never a good idea to have some test their own designs which is why I think of UI as the design element and UX as the research element. but, maybe it is all just perspective.

    1 point
    • Daniel SchwarzDaniel Schwarz, over 1 year ago

      Definitely a matter of perspective for sure, and perhaps something we'll never find a concrete answer for. Fact of the matter is, it's hard to describe yourself (or what you do) in a single line.

      0 points
  • Oz LozanoOz Lozano, over 1 year ago

    Something in me dies every time I see one of those stupid UX vs UI analogy illustrations.

    1 point
  • Scott Burns, over 1 year ago

    I tend to just say I'm a Senior Designer, everything else seems to change with the wind, and folk even slightly removed from what we do don't understand any of the other terminology anyway.

    I would choose UI over UX for myself if asked to pick, even though I do wireframing, user testing and the like, the UI is the bit I'm most interested in, personally. Yeah, UI is a part of UX (and vice versa) but then it depends if it's genuinely a UI gig as to whether it's the right name for it; in some places it seems to be replacing Digital Designer as a term, which could include all sorts of stuff that isn't designing UI.

    1 point
  • Mathieu MayerMathieu Mayer, over 1 year ago

    By that logic, my friend working as a Network Engineer is also a UX Designer! I will tell him, he will be pleased.

    0 points