9 comments

  • Matt C, over 2 years ago

    Kind of a bait and switch. The headline and lead-in imply the article is going to argue in favor of header carousels but then when you get to the meat the author is actually arguing in favor of in-content carousels like image galleries (which, as far as I know, few people have a problem with).

    Regardless, I do agree with the author - carousels definitely have a place but are often abused.

    PS: I call this interaction a carousel because I personally reserve the term slider for range inputs.

    8 points
  • Juan J. RamirezJuan J. Ramirez, over 2 years ago

    There are several UI controls I call sliders and this is not one of those.

    3 points
  • Andrew Richardson, over 2 years ago

    I think the biggest argument against sliders is general discoverability. It obscures a lot of potentially useful content. There are ways to solve this: using small thumbnails to give hits at the content. For the traditional "Hero" slider though solving this is very challenging.

    So it comes down to an opportunity cost issue. If you ask yourself "What's the best way to let users discover this content?" the answer is rarely a "hero" slider. There's almost always a better way to do it that accomplishes the same goals.

    2 points
  • Peter BinghamPeter Bingham, over 2 years ago

    I find 2 or 3 slides useful. I object when a client gets control of their "finished" site and add in 10 slides, though. It's as though they can't decide what the site's focus should be (and if they don't know then how the hell should the end-user/customer know?).

    I guess it's open to abuse.

    1 point
  • Shaun Barton, over 2 years ago

    I've been on the anti slider bandwagon for awhile, the article makes some compelling arguments. When it comes to mobile sliding / swiping is a natural user experience. My biggest reason I shy away from them is unflattering photography from clients. You design something that works great with some photography from unsplash for example, and then the design just doesn't work with the clients photography.

    0 points
    • Thomas Lowry, over 2 years ago

      We removed the carousel on one of our web properties and saw a 40% increase in click-through traffic to the campaigns once they weren't hidden within the carousel.

      The same people who we had to fight to get them to align with our way of thinking still want the carousel back because they want more real estate in the hero banner. FML.

      0 points