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Why is my dribbble shot not popular?

over 2 years ago from , UI Designer at Hi INTERACTIVE

I added a cool dribbble shot a few days ago

https://dribbble.com/shots/3817780-The-Gem

https://dribbble.com/shots/3711182-Pappo-Mobile-App

https://dribbble.com/shots/3842714-OutSystems-Services-Landing-Page

I have 30 likes and 265 views so far but my shot is not popular. I know being popular is hard and you must have a lot of followers but how can one get followers if your shots are not popular. It's like dribbble makes its super hard for newcomers and very easy for old established designers.

Any tips?

Edit: (Add other shots, I feel that you are concentrating a lot on the opinion of one of my shots only).

36 comments

  • Ismael Branco, over 2 years ago

    you dont have a landing page with no purpose, also you dont have freaky gradients not even useless transitions!

    Advice: just keeping posting what you do. Don't make dribbble-driven work on purpose. it's not worthy for newcomers. Just keep doing your work and keep posting.

    27 points
    • Interested Curious, over 2 years ago

      See I get dribble criticism, but at the same time it's super selfish to think that the problem with the over cluttered thumbnail is that it's not "useless" enough.

      Maybe having a visually appealing thumbnail is solving the problem of marketing yourself on a designer search engine that isn't only for UX design?

      The original poster should without question keep posting their work, but the top works aren't even all things for UX.

      The better advice is try alternate thumbnail solutions. If the person is going to visit the site, sell it differently. Try A/B testing. Apply the things you know in more than one context and be more than a textbook definition, "that's pretty and can't apply to what i do, so it's BAD"

      2 points
    • André Ramalho, over 2 years ago

      Thanks for the advice ;)

      0 points
  • Kemie GuaidaKemie Guaida, over 2 years ago

    A little constructive criticism too: your thumbnail is not very appealing. What I mean is, it's not the best way to present your design. The page in the back and the background make it look very busy and take focus away from the main page. A thumbnail needs to be easy to scan at small sizes.

    9 points
    • Scott ThomasScott Thomas, over 2 years ago

      Ha, I agree. Also my eyes go right to that women holding her belly at the top that in the background.

      0 points
  • Kyle DeckerKyle Decker, over 2 years ago

    This is it! This is the one. This is the post that has finally convinced me to stop checking Designer News regularly. Wow

    7 points
  • Lev MiseriLev Miseri, over 2 years ago

    Cause it's a shitty shot. You have 400x300 rectangle to show what you got. If you don't convert on that rectangle, nobody cares about the rest. That's the game.

    7 points
    • R. KamushkenR. Kamushken, over 2 years ago

      holy true! just watch the click-attachment stats of top shots: approx. ~25% of people goes deeper to attachment... Less, if you out of demand

      0 points
  • Bevan StephensBevan Stephens, over 2 years ago

    Why do you care about being popular with other designers?

    Making work that impresses other designers can actually be detrimental to your design work. You'll end up adding features and elements that have no value to non-designer people. It's a waste of time and resources.

    Unless of course the target audience of your product or service mainly consists of other designers, but this is uncommon. Generally designers make up less than 0.01% of the average population.

    6 points
    • Doug OrchardDoug Orchard, over 2 years ago

      I think that a lot of people get noticed by clients when their work is popular. It's not unknown to make a living from people seeing your work on dribbble

      1 point
      • Bevan StephensBevan Stephens, over 2 years ago

        That's true. But these people may have not achieved that goal by trying to get likes on their dribble shots. That was probably just a by-product of doing great work.

        1 point
  • Crampa ...Crampa ..., over 2 years ago

    Is dribbble even relevant in 2017? lol

    3 points
  • John PJohn P, over 2 years ago

    You go to other peoples shots and write something like "So slick, check out my shot "

    3 points
  • Jan SemlerJan Semler, over 2 years ago

    You can post a Link on Designernews and try to catch some followers maybe? I think this might be a good idea...

    3 points
  • David SimpsonDavid Simpson, over 2 years ago

    do you even skeumorphic bro?

    3 points
  • Elvijs Vilevich, over 2 years ago

    "Sit down, be humble"

    – Kendrick Lamar

    3 points
  • Robert AniteiRobert Anitei, over 2 years ago

    You need to present your work much better. A simple image is more than enough. For example, this shot worked better than other because I kept it simple. You can also attach more images to the shot if you want to show more.

    Just keep posting good work and the followers and popularity will come.

    2 points
  • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, over 2 years ago

    Any tips?

    Persistance.

    2 points
  • Jesse PociskJesse Pocisk, over 2 years ago

    You need to post it on designernews to market it.

    2 points
  • Vincent MillikenVincent Milliken, over 2 years ago

    wat

    2 points
  • Eli Silva, over 2 years ago

    Focus on usability, decision making and why you made your design the way it is, not what it looks like. Also, the presentation is busy and doesn't invite the viewer to take notice of any one thing.

    1 point
  • Interested Curious, over 2 years ago

    Keep the shots simpler and focus on an element of the work instead of the entire page. The thumbnails the eye catcher.

    While the platform does benefit people who have been members longest, traffic and likes on your page will move you up the rankings.

    People who dig through search will more likely click out of curiosity if you leave some of the work to the imagination.

    1 point
  • Thomas Michael SemmlerThomas Michael Semmler, over 2 years ago

    That is a very simple question and you could know the answer, as a designer. Dribbble most of the time does not reward creativity or good execution - it is a showcase for trends and how well you adapted them trends. And it is also a good place for nike shoes to be put on cards. I see no nike shoe, I see no gradient, I see no animation that you cannot reproduce and you are not using trendy colors, so of course your shot is not getting much attention.

    1 point
  • David Steelcart, over 2 years ago

    Asking/begging for upvotes directly on dribbble would be helpful

    0 points
  • Lucas DebelderLucas Debelder, over 2 years ago

    Share every shot on your twitter/pinterest etc. If you look at my Twitter feed it's all spammed with shameless Dribbble post spam

    0 points
  • stephen fstephen f, over 2 years ago

    1) I don't think you do justice to you work with the shot, the shot is a bit meh, but when i actually went to the site i was impressed. 2) Attach a full view or at least something to give more depth and engage with people viewing it. at the moment you don't have much content meat to actually look at and wow people with. 3) Keep going, keep posting

    0 points
  • Justin Rands, over 2 years ago

    You have to show something extremely slick in a VERY small space. Look at what shots are popular. See how they're using the 800x600 space. Nothing is busy on those shots, and everything is placed with intention.

    Also, be funny! Have personality, show something DIFFERENT.

    0 points
  • Robert AniteiRobert Anitei, over 2 years ago

    Ok, so now you are changing the links to get more views on your shots?

    Not cool!

    0 points
  • Aaron Wears Many HatsAaron Wears Many Hats, over 2 years ago

    Because it's neither groundbreaking nor a particularly exciting image..

    0 points
  • Joe Baker, over 2 years ago

    Post more.

    0 points
  • Josh Sanders, over 2 years ago

    This post is why DN needs a new category badge, "Irrelevant dribbble musings"...

    On the real though... go make good design and stop worrying about internet "likes". Build a strong portfolio, go to networking events, market yourself as best you can, and sure, post your work to dribbble, Behance etc. But relying on likes and your work being 'popular' as one of the main methods to attract potential clients is settings yourself up for failure.

    0 points