20 comments

  • Jon MyersJon Myers, over 2 years ago

    Yeah, I agree with Jalopnik. Dash looks like crap and looks like the inside of a police car.

    About like this:

    CopCar

    1 point
  • Bobby AndersonBobby Anderson, over 2 years ago

    The controls are probably about as confusing as the first time anyone steps into a new car with their own sets of dash controls, buttons, vents and knobs. I can only assume that these controls, very much like any other ordinary car, would become second nature after a while.

    1 point
    • Interested Curious, over 2 years ago

      Eh, I'm not so sure. Major functions tied to a touch pad for a car don't seem like a good move. Second nature or not, it seems to involve a lot more navigation than needed. Like he moves his hands pretty far. And that persons just in the passenger seat.

      0 points
    • D. M., over 2 years ago

      Hmm. This sounds like what most modern car UI designers are thinking. More often than not, it results in just plain old bad design.

      0 points
  • Stephen OlmsteadStephen Olmstead, over 2 years ago

    Andrew Goodland did a mockup of this and created a basic prototype that was fun to play around with: https://twitter.com/Ichorus/status/892715854860832768

    1 point
  • Account deleted over 2 years ago

    Jalopnik sensationalises everything for page views. And Tesla drives high traffic. They've been picking apart every little thing about this car for almost a year now.

    0 points
    • Jim Silverman, over 2 years ago

      understood, but was there anything specific in this particular critique that struck you as invalid?

      0 points
      • Account deleted over 2 years ago

        Well the fact that he is judging it off a video and hasn't actually used it brings up some alarm bells for me.

        Personally I think touch screens are extremely stupid for car interfaces, but that isn't exclusive to the Model 3. Apart from that the UI looked about as intuitive as it a touch based UX could get.

        He say's its low contrast, which it might be, again it's kinda hard to tell from someone else's video. There could be an accessibility mode which we don't know about.

        Also the fact that he claims to have a background in UX and then says nothing else about it to try and give the article legitimacy seems suspicious to me, especially with Jalop's horrible UX across the board.

        To be honest I visit and enjoy Jalopnik daily but they really like to sensationalise non issues, especially when they dont have the full story, and to criticise the UX or something you havent actually used is a bit dishonest.

        1 point
  • Stuart McCoyStuart McCoy, over 2 years ago

    So, they guy has never used the UI/UX in person but decides to comment on it in a "professional" manner anyway? Go to a Tesla showroom and at least do a little research before commenting on a video posted to Twitter.

    0 points
  • Thomas RawcliffeThomas Rawcliffe, over 2 years ago

    I'm a little disappointed that this article criticizes the design without providing a suggested alternative.

    0 points
    • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, over 2 years ago

      yeah. he copped out with an "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" argument.

      0 points
      • Nick B., over 2 years ago

        I don't think he copped out. He provided several reasonable arguments for why he thinks the current "standard" system is superior — more tactile and visually distinct (arguable, but valid), visual feedback on their status even when not in use, ability to control vents independently of other car functions. Those are all valid reasons.

        1 point
  • Alim MaasogluAlim Maasoglu, over 2 years ago

    Garbage article. Good job.

    0 points