20 comments

  • Nice ShoesNice Shoes, almost 6 years ago

    Sigh.

    Programmes such as this and many others make me sad.

    I put in a lot of hours to learn code so I can understand everything that I'm doing. Programmes like Macaw undermine the theory and practical knowledge you get by doing it 'by hand'.

    You can't fix a car if you dont know what's under the hood.

    2 points
    • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, almost 6 years ago

      it's called progress.

      interestingly, had you taken the time to learn about Macaw, you'd see that you'd need an understanding of front-end code for in order for it to output clean, semantic code.

      1 point
    • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, almost 6 years ago (edited almost 6 years ago )

      [double post, somehow]

      0 points
    • Greg CorbyGreg Corby, almost 6 years ago

      I disagree. I put in a lot of hours to learn code as well, but that doesn't mean I can't use tools to automate certain tasks, or take off some of the heavy lifting. I agree that some "wysiwyg" programs are bad for development, but this tool still requires knowledge of code, and I'd even argue it may help teach you code.

      0 points
    • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, almost 6 years ago

      Programmes like Macaw undermine the theory and practical knowledge you get by doing it 'by hand'.

      I think you’re misinterpreting what Macaw is, how it helps and its intended use. I see it as a tool designed for people at the intermediate and pro level. It seems like you have a lot of control over the code it generates, and like it could fit into many different workflows, including as a scratchpad for mocking up a site design that will be used to build templates and hand coded later.

      0 points
    • Jason BlockJason Block, almost 6 years ago

      The difference here is that Macaw claims to produce good, optimized code. Not Dreamweaver gobbledygook.

      I don't think it undermines anything, really. It just raises the bare minimum, and encourages beginners to see what best practices are (and the people that just want a pretty site will get that super quickly and won't have to worry about it not being well-written code)

      0 points
    • Joe TurnerJoe Turner, almost 6 years ago

      I agree with you to an extent, I think there will still be great value in knowing how to create a website with your bare hands. Don't worry, it's not a dying art.

      0 points
    • George ColtartGeorge Coltart, almost 6 years ago

      If you could fix your car well enough to get you home with an "Auto-fix-it" button, I bet you would use it :)

      0 points
    • Axel ValdezAxel Valdez, almost 6 years ago

      If you know your craft there's nothing bad in using Macaw, because of the clean code it produces and the process needed to create something on it you're still in control and you can tweak and change the output easily.

      The problem I see is for people with no knowledge of HTML and CSS. It is awesome that they will be able to create things with a decent code output, but beginners are most likely to be stuck as they will see no need to learn how to actually do it by hand. No problem for the web, though, just for them and their careers.

      0 points
  • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, almost 6 years ago

    Backed it. I think Macaw is going to be great. Really excited by it.

    1 point
  • Kelly SuttonKelly Sutton, almost 6 years ago

    It's not for me, but I'll chip in a few bucks. The world could use some competition.

    1 point
  • Andy KeilAndy Keil, almost 6 years ago

    Software is a bad fit for Kickstarter traditionally. Will be interesting to see if they pull it off.

    fwiw, I think it's a poor show of character to use Kickstarter to get people to fund teh building of the application.

    1 point
    • John FlynnJohn Flynn, almost 6 years ago

      Agreed. I'm excited for the opportunity to get my hands on Macaw more quickly, but Kickstartering software—especially the "last push" of an application already under development—leaves sort of a bad taste in my mouth at the same time.

      1 point
    • Andrew LiebchenAndrew Liebchen, almost 6 years ago

      Why is it a poor show of character to fund software on Kickstarter? How is it different than the producers of a physical product who use KS as a pre-order system?

      1 point
    • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, almost 6 years ago

      “Software is a bad fit for Kickstarter traditionally”

      Really? Why? Lots of games have been funded on Kickstarter. I don’t see why this is different to other digital products on Kickstarter.

      “leaves sort of a bad taste in my mouth at the same time”

      I don’t get that at all. Why?! They’ve invested a huge amount of time and effort and want to know if others like the project, before embarking on the final stretch. It also may help from a marketing perspective. Seems really sensible to me, with the devs and users winning.

      1 point
      • Jonathan YapJonathan Yap, almost 6 years ago

        I agree, i think its clever to marketing and cutting the time to make the final push. 2 birds 1 stone.

        For an independent developer perspective, to have a secure amount of demand, its helps knowing that all those hours are not fruitless.

        Now the pressure is on for them to deliver once its funded.

        0 points
  • Adam WintleAdam Wintle, almost 6 years ago

    Impressive, $25,000 in just one hour

    0 points
  • Stephen Weir, almost 6 years ago

    If you think of Macaw as replacing photoshop and not your text editor it makes alot of sense.

    I don't like designing in the browser it just doesn't suit my workflow so still start in photoshop, now if i could design something in Macaw and export it to HTML/CSS then show the client it would save me alot of time.

    You would still need coding skills to then modify the exported files into a CMS theme or whatever implementation you needed.

    0 points
    • Andy KeilAndy Keil, almost 6 years ago

      With a basic knowledge of code, you could use something like http://900dpi.com to convert the exported HTML/CSS into a CMS. They're in private beta right now.

      0 points
    • Axel ValdezAxel Valdez, almost 6 years ago

      That's exactly why I'm excited about Macaw. I do design in the browser sometimes and although I have pretty strong HTML and CSS skills I could use something that speeds up my process and doesn't spit a mess of code.

      I don't se Macaw replacing my current workflow, but speeding it up a lot.

      0 points