7 comments

  • Steve OrchoskySteve Orchosky, almost 3 years ago

    I like how when you change the budget to "good," the client title no longer matters.

    11 points
  • Ale UrrutiaAle Urrutia, almost 3 years ago

    This is magic...

    3 points
  • Bugsy SailorBugsy Sailor, almost 3 years ago

    Well done Jessica!

    2 points
  • Wes OudshoornWes Oudshoorn, almost 3 years ago

    It is so important to see examples on how to be professional as a creative. I applaud Jessica for showing the simple business side of creative work and the client-related challenges we might come across.

    I especially like the way she writes about doing work for free. It is often the jobs that cross the boundaries between private life and work that can turn out ugly, and setting expectations is an important thing to do.

    I personally would not add the option of them buying me a very good bottle of whisky, but rather go the "full professional client" route or the "you don't owe me anything" route. Anything you get back (them helping you move, buying you coffee, a bottle of whiskey) would be just nice.

    1 point
  • Josh CapederJosh Capeder, almost 3 years ago

    Thank you Jessica!

    0 points
  • Bryce Thompson, almost 3 years ago

    This is making me rethink my approach to "No Budget" inbound, but I've personally gotten "no budget" leads that turned into 100k+ projects when all is said and done. To me that's the most interesting part of her generator.

    I still waste time on poor inbound leads, even the ones with good references (which in theory should mitigate the lead quality). You just never know, I really like the tool though.

    0 points
  • Mat RansonMat Ranson, almost 3 years ago

    "If you are wondering how I differentiate a “nonprofit” from a “charity”, I generally ask myself “Is everyone volunteering or just me?”."

    Great way to argue the fairness of pay on non-profit work!

    0 points