26 comments

  • Jason MosleyJason Mosley, 1 year ago

    I've waited so long. I almost stopped believing...

    9 points
    • Jason Rodriguez, 1 year ago

      I don't think most people believed in the first place. Huge move from Gmail, not only opening up more traditional responsive design options, but will lead everyone away from using inline styles, too. Say hello to more compact, maintainable email code...

      4 points
  • Tobias ReichTobias Reich, 1 year ago

    Knock, knock. Who’s there? 2012.

    It was about time. Happy to see some movement, but there're still enough mail-clients far behind. Developing emails is such a pain.

    6 points
  • Tom WoodTom Wood, 1 year ago

    As exciting as this should be, we'll still have to design for the worst case scenario – so in reality it makes little difference in the short term.

    As mentioned by Jason, if it leads to everyone changing their standards then that would be amazing.

    3 points
    • Dylan SmithDylan Smith, 1 year ago

      The worst case scenario now will be Outlook, which made a huge deal last month out of getting their shit together.

      There are a bunch of smaller clients that will probably never change. But — as with web development — check your analytics and know specifically which clients you need to design for.

      5 points
      • Tom WoodTom Wood, 1 year ago

        I'm not sure I agree with your last point — the worst case scenario is the client you need to design for. If 80% of our user base can see the email perfectly, but 20% can't, it's the 20% I need to design for.

        3 points
        • Dylan SmithDylan Smith, 1 year ago

          If that number is 20%, sure. What if the number is 20? What if the number is .2%?

          Depending on how many users are on obscure or outdated email clients or web browsers, many companies make the call to ignore them because it isn't worth the additional time cost.

          0 points
    • Jason Rodriguez, 1 year ago

      As Dylan mentioned, the worst case scenario for most people is now Outlook. The two good things about Outlook are that 1) all of their bugs are essentially known issues with known fixes and 2) Microsoft is actively looking to improve Outlook, so hopefully those problems will eventually be fixed.

      It will potentially make a big difference in the short term, since designers will be able to stop inlining styles if they want to, which will be a big productivity win. It will help clean up the code and reduce style duplication and make the creation and maintenance of emails much, much better.

      2 points
      • Drew AlbinsonDrew Albinson, 1 year ago

        Is there a list somewhere of which clients will still require inline styles? I would love to stop inlining styles as soon as possible.

        0 points
  • Tyce Clee, 1 year ago

    'Bout time!

    1 point
  • Tim HartwickTim Hartwick, 1 year ago

    Finally! No more inlined styles is going to be so nice.

    1 point
  • Michael AuerMichael Auer, 1 year ago

    The still don't support -webkit-font-smoothing

    1 point
  • Patrick Haney, 1 year ago

    Curious to see if this includes the Gmail app for Android and iOS. CSS support is coming for "Gmail and Inbox" but that's about all the info we have for now.

    0 points
    • George Bartz, 1 year ago

      That's the real question. I wonder how many people use gmail.com/inbox on their mobile browser. If the mobile apps don't support this, it's not a huge improvement.

      1 point
      • Jason Rodriguez, 1 year ago

        We'll see when it rolls out, but I suspect that the change is happening on their preprocessor/sanitizer that they use before emails even hit individual clients, so it should cover most of their email clients.

        1 point
        • Jameson Tyler, 1 year ago (edited 1 year ago )

          Exactly, as long as the styles aren't stripped, they should work fine within the iOS WebView. I assume that has rough parity with Mobile Safari.

          0 points
    • Tim HartwickTim Hartwick, 1 year ago

      Agreed. The .gif in the announcement article looks like a native app, not sure exactly which one though.

      1 point
  • Joann Weitervoh, 1 year ago

    I think it's time.

    0 points
  • Max Quinn, 1 year ago

    Thank god for that!

    My main gripe with Gmail at the minute is that they support -webkit-linear-gradient, but not -webkit-background-clip or -webkit-text-fill-color, so while gradient text degrades gracefully everywhere else it's impossible with gmail. So strange that it supports just that webkit property and not the others.

    0 points
  • Luis La TorreLuis La Torre, 1 year ago

    I am not sure what this mean really? I know What CSS Media queries are, but what does mean that Gmail will use them. Not everyone uses gmail. Please someone expand on this.

    0 points
    • Alex ChanAlex Chan, 1 year ago (edited 1 year ago )

      Gmail (website and mobile app) has never supported CSS media queries in HTML emails (see: https://www.campaignmonitor.com/css/). This made it really difficult for responsive email designs to adapt in the Gmail mobile apps and was generally a very frustrating thing to deal with (as are most things in the HTML email world).

      3 points