13 comments

  • Laurens SpangenbergLaurens Spangenberg, 5 years ago

    They forgot to mention one of the best advantages: the price.

    3 points
  • louie solomonlouie solomon, 5 years ago

    “It was painful to delete a segment from a shape. You have to select the nodes that surround that segment (one at a time) and click Break Curve with the Node Tool. Then click anywhere on the canvas to deselect the entire shape and click on the segment to select and delete it. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to delete a segment from a shape directly”.

    This has been a major pain point for me while working with the pen tool in Affinity Designer. Really not sure why they designed it this way, but the process of going from a closed path to an open path doesn't feel natural.

    3 points
    • Scott LewisScott Lewis, 5 years ago

      Hi Louie, thanks for the comment. Have you shared this feedback with Matt (AD lead developer) and the Affinity Designer team? They are very responsive and engaging and really do pay attention to user feedback. Honestly, if they were to fix this issue Affinity Designer would be that much more appealing to me. I can get used to the way things are done in AD but I'd love to have a modifier key to allow me to delete a line segment the same way I can delete nodes.

      0 points
  • Greg Warner, 5 years ago

    I've been using the 1.5 beta since it came out for UI support/illustration/icon design, and I've loved it all the way. It's a substantial improvement over the earlier releases.

    0 points
    • Scott LewisScott Lewis, 5 years ago

      Yes, the new beta as well as the latest production release are great improvements. It is really impressive what Serif Labs has accomplished in a short time.

      0 points
  • John PJohn P, 5 years ago

    Illustrator tends to be a little choppy and lags due to massive memory requirements

    This is a complete misunderstanding about the problems with illustrator. Even if you threw limitless memory at it the thing would still perform poorly because it uses the computers hardware poorly.

    With poorly architectured apps computing power can only get you so far, Illustrator doesn't even use that much memory and the CPU is does use is just used poorly.

    0 points
    • Scott LewisScott Lewis, 5 years ago

      Can you explain what you mean? How does Illustrator poorly use the computer's hardware? One common criticism of Illustrator is that the code base is bloated and out-of-date, which would seem to be consistent with it poorly implementing newer hardware but that's a bit deeper than my understanding of the software.

      0 points