25 comments

  • Account deleted over 3 years ago

    This depends a lot on if you mean other designers in a team (or same company) or if you mean social channels like Dribbble.

    Regardless, the worst thing you can do is simply toss a design over and ask someone what they think. To get good feedback you need to tell the story first... What the problem was, your thoughts, any hard requirements... And THEN show the work as a solution.

    This way people have context and can give you deeper, meaningful feedback.

    7 points
    • Bryce HowitsonBryce Howitson, over 3 years ago

      Do you have a preferred way to provide that story? Annotated screenshots? A write-up? Video?

      0 points
      • Account deleted over 3 years ago (edited over 3 years ago )

        At the FT job, I will make up a quick presentation deck. Outline the problem(s), the goal(s), and then walk through the design as a solution supporting everything. If possible, I also include examples of other executions as support for a direction or stats from websites/articles etc.

        IMHO, it should be pretty quick and dirty. No need to make some award-winning deck. The goal is to align people along a common understanding and train of thought. If done right, and if you've done proper stuff, steering them to your solution is less of an uphill battle.

        0 points
    • Rachel MerskyRachel Mersky, over 3 years ago

      Honestly, I struggle with this point. I used to subscribe to that fully, and it's absolutely the best way to sell your work to a client, but I think all the story, context, thought process stuff can be too leading if you're trying to get real feedback. A user isn't going to have that kind of context when they use your site/product, it has to be clear in and of itself.

      0 points
      • Account deleted over 3 years ago

        Very fair point. I think the goal when I do it is to at least align everyone on the core requirements more than anything. Otherwise you risk getting feedback from designers that don't don't take into account management/business directives, etc.

        I think it all comes down to being less of a sell... and more of a "this is the situation".

        0 points
    • , over 3 years ago

      No, I mean designers outside my team. Thanks you for the suggestion.

      0 points
  • Ollie BarkerOllie Barker, over 3 years ago

    Trello and Invision are great tools. Trello is great for lots and lots of feedback, while Invision is great to preview the design and see it in the context of a browser (if a web project).

    3 points
    • Emile-Victor PortenartEmile-Victor Portenart, over 3 years ago

      One great way to share feedback with Trello is to use it with getmarker.io . This way, when you preview your design right into your browser you can capture it, annotate it and directly send it to your trello board. Super fast and easy ! At our agency we use it all the time :-)

      3 points
    • Erica Louise, over 3 years ago

      Hey! Thanks, will give it a try.

      0 points
  • Niklas DornNiklas Dorn, over 3 years ago

    We love InVision here for prototyping and interactive designs. MarvelApp https://marvelapp.com/ is a great tool as well.

    There's also Filestage https://filestage.io/. It's a web app to manage reviews and design approvals. Clients and co-workers can simply click on the videos, images and audio files to leave precise comments and change requests. Let me know if you have any questions. I am a co-founder.

    2 points
  • Jeremy FordJeremy Ford, over 3 years ago

    If seeking quick feedback on something small and relatively simple, we usually use Slack channels. If seeking feedback on a design that is more involved, we typically use commenting within Invision or Jira.

    2 points
  • Thiago Duarte, over 3 years ago

    I just ask my co-workers in person. Simple and effective.

    2 points
  • Bevan StephensBevan Stephens, over 3 years ago (edited over 3 years ago )

    In my company I get feedback from both stakeholders and end users and then put something like this together and print it out massive and put it on the wall, it really helps to visualise the areas that need work and forms a thing to stand around whilst discussing it with your team.

    The coloured boxes contain a piece of feedback, the colours represent where they came from (e.g. orange = user testing, blue = marketing department).

    Imgur

    1 point
  • Tovi ZhongTovi Zhong, over 3 years ago

    Look at this: https://trello.com/b/nPNSBZjB/trello-resources Maybe can use trello to gather

    1 point
  • Vishal Gangadin, over 3 years ago

    With our designteam we use Wake.io to show our designs and receive feedback and kudos of course. Works very well, you can upload and paste stuff from your clipboard or take screenshots using the OSX app.

    Your team will get a personal Wake 'space' and you'll get notified if someone uploaded anything or commented on your own post. With the use of hashtags you can organize different projects and check out the process from the first wip to the final design.

    1 point
  • Henk Batenburg, over 3 years ago

    Customer use testing, real life testing with target audience, Dribbble, other designers and more!

    0 points
  • Joe Baker, over 3 years ago

    You could always win the lottery by having someone give a thoughtful critique on Dribbble.

    The rollover is 3 weeks.

    0 points
  • Jake FlemingJake Fleming, over 3 years ago

    I turn to the other designer next to me and show them, explain my goal of the design, the type of feedback I want at this stage, and then open my ears. Getting feedback digitally is pretty terrible unless you're on a call with someone while presenting your design.

    If you don't have the luxury of working closely with other designers, I highly recommend getting feedback over a google hangout or something similar so that you can have a conversation and each of you can share your screens.

    0 points
  • Cristian MoiseiCristian Moisei, over 3 years ago

    If you explain your work, provide context to it (who it was designed for, what were they trying to do, etc.), and ask for specific feedback (i.e. areas that you would like critiqued, problems that you would like a second opinion on), even sites like dribbble can be useful. See this example:

    https://dribbble.com/shots/2823074-Tubik-Studio-Book-Swap?page=2#comment-5410008

    0 points
  • Joel Cook, over 3 years ago

    Were I work we use: marvelapp.com

    0 points
  • , over 3 years ago

    Thank you for your suggestions. :)

    0 points