31 comments

  • Giovanni HobbinsGiovanni Hobbins, over 3 years ago

    Totally agree. Take any opinion (like Eli's) for what it's worth, move on. At least he's contributing to the discussion publicly and putting thought and time behind his writing.

    20 points
  • anthony thomasanthony thomas, over 3 years ago

    This was such a pain to read. I have no clue what you're saying because you give no clear judgments. Sounds like you're tiptoeing on eggshells instead of just saying what you really think. You sound so measured and perfunctory in your thoughts that I don't even care.

    Your TLDR could be summarized to: Eli is a good guy. He's different. People aren't ready for external criticism.

    You have said nothing of substance. Waste of my time.

    16 points
  • Michael CookMichael Cook, over 3 years ago

    I also agree and appreciate Eli's writing and role in the community.

    I think that some people are projecting a villainous persona onto him which is untrue and hurtful. Maybe this is because we sometimes perceive people who are highly logical and argumentative as hostile which is understandable but not necessarily true.

    A lot of the issue seem to stem from disagreements about the role of criticism.

    Regardless of the true role of criticism or Eli's true intentions, the way he is been treated by adult professionals that I follow and admire is saddening. And the threats of banning and censorship are very worrying.

    The amount of times people choose to insult/mock him personally is disgusting.

    10 points
    • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, over 3 years ago

      The amount of times people choose to insult/mock him personally is disgusting.

      that's the thing though. he makes it personal. he's not merely critiquing design, he is critiquing designers and how he perceives their opinions. taking just part 3 of his essay on the Instagram logo as an example, he chastises grossly out-of-context statements from Ian Spalter, Robert Padbury, Chappell Ellison, Jared Spool, and the writers at The Verge. by doing so, he is looking to elicit a reaction and spark notoriety.

      most memorably, he literally took specific phrases and words out of sentences of Cap Watkins' "The Boring Designer" to twist their meaning to his own use:

      Cap Watkins and 3000 of his supporters who advocate for an ideal "lazy" and "boring" designer who never experiments and "Chooses obvious over clever every time." A perfect designer who compromises their vision to fit what is easiest to produce, not what is best to produce. Most of all, as a manager, Watkins reveres supplicatory designers who "rarely stand their ground." source

      when "critiques" lash out in every direction, there's bound to be some blowback.

      5 points
      • Michael CookMichael Cook, over 3 years ago

        when "critiques" lash out in every direction, there's bound to be some blowback.

        And the blowback should be dismissal at worst and responses that attempt to provide a more insightful, more accurate understanding of the situation presented in an even more eloquent way than Eli, at best.

        Eli cannot make responses towards him personal. To say that something we think is mean or unacceptable deserves meanness retaliated is an unsustainable approach to community. I think that the only healthy response is to be better, more patient, more thoughtful, and more articulate.

        2 points
        • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, over 3 years ago

          To say that something we think is mean or unacceptable deserves meanness retaliated is an unsustainable approach to community.

          fair point, but we shouldn't be surprised when such writing lowers the standard of discourse.

          1 point
      • Art VandelayArt Vandelay, over 3 years ago

        This is what 90% of the general media does, why is it only shocking here?

        1 point
  • Sean O'GradySean O'Grady, over 3 years ago

    I'm no fan of Eli but he entirely has the right to voice his opinions. I may find said opinions overly negative, condescending, distasteful and clickbaity but that's entirely his prerogative. People who demand that he stops aren't in the right.

    7 points
  • Michael B., over 3 years ago

    Who is Eli? Why do we care about what Eli thinks?

    5 points
    • Pierre B.Pierre B., over 3 years ago

      And who is Michael B, why should we care? A guy whose last two comments are "Really? I thought it looks like shit." and "Their client work is nice - their portfolio looks like dog shit." How valuable, really.

      11 points
  • Dan GDan G, over 3 years ago

    Really?

    5 points
    • Mitch BartlettMitch Bartlett, over 3 years ago

      Are you so arrogant that you can't fathom anyone liking Eli's criticism? :)

      13 points
      • Dan GDan G, over 3 years ago

        It's not so much that I don't think he should be allowed to express his opinion, it's more that I'm not convinced we need another front page post telling everyone that it's okay for him to have an opinion.

        He's already (hilariously) verging on celebrity status here, it's just another log on the fire.

        6 points
  • Dean HaydenDean Hayden, over 3 years ago

    You know what, I look forward to his posts. I may not agree or like what he says but they're an entertaining read and it does create a lot of discussion.

    I'd rather see more of this than 'side project, work all hours, you're a worthless designer, is it UI or UX?, gah that green, it's not art, user needs first, use a pencil, I love Sketch, I hate Sketch, evil Adobe, can a MacBook edit 4K video?' posts that often have no real conclusion or, at worst, promote yet another thing (SAS, newsletter, startup, take your pick).

    More of people like Eli. I know that may seem controversial but I want to see his nemesis on here and all in between.

    p.s. I'm indifferent about Sketch and I like the Spotify green.

    2 points
  • Stefan TrkuljaStefan Trkulja, over 3 years ago

    These 3 paragraphs warranted a medium post? Really?

    0 points
    • Rob McMackin, over 3 years ago

      It's actually a response to another post. Medium responses can now be viewed as individual posts. It's Medium's way of trying to improve the quality of conversation and exchange on topics. The fact that "responses" are now being posted up here as articles is an interesting behaviour that kind of shows it's working.

      2 points
    • Michael CookMichael Cook, over 3 years ago

      Curious as to why that's an issue and what would be better

      2 points
      • Stefan TrkuljaStefan Trkulja, over 3 years ago

        Because this is just a small step above everyone posting their (slightly) opinionated Tweets here. What would be better is to have quality content pop up on DN. :)

        0 points