20 comments

  • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

    The post-screen era ... Interfaces laid on top of your everyday visual existence. No cumbersome devices. No clumsy apps.

    A projected interface is still effectively a screen. It will still run “clumsy apps”.

    The problem for designers is that to make an interface for VR you need to have specialist skills, and be able to program in 3D.

    Says who? “Program in 3D”?

    9 points
    • , almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

      I think what Sam meant in his article is that for UI designers to step into interface design for VR, the best way right now is to design straight in a 3D software such as C4D or else. How could we open the whole VR space to designers with limited or no 3D skills?

      0 points
      • Bjarke DaugaardBjarke Daugaard, almost 5 years ago

        It is just another new tool to learn. Designers will (like everyone else) have to learn new tools from now and to the day they retire. Also as someone with an Interaction Design degree a UI is not limited to a screen at all and designing for VR is just like designing object for the "real" world

        5 points
      • Ian GoodeIan Goode, over 4 years ago

        How could we open the whole VR space to designers with limited or no 3D skills?

        One option is to talk to game designers or architects. They work with 3D space all the time.

        1 point
        • Sam ApplebeeSam Applebee, over 4 years ago

          We've not spoken to game designers yet - but we've talked to companies that make 3D environments for architects and airlines. Do you have anything you would like to ask? We're going to be putting some questions to some VR experts for our wrap-up article next week.

          0 points
      • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

        Yep, some 3D skills will definitely be needed, but not for everything. If the UI is 2D panels in a 3D world, straight textures or texture, bump and other maps might go a long way. I think at this point the entire VR and AR space is wide open and no one really knows the practical uses beyond games and some other niche applications. It is not yet clear if it will be anywhere near as big as the smartphone. If anything, the world is likely to be filled with more glass rectangles showing UI, not less.

        I agree VR and AR are a huge deal, but to suggest UI design is going to be killed by AR or no UI at all is either premature or completely wrong.

        4 points
        • Sam ApplebeeSam Applebee, almost 5 years ago

          Agree it's way too early to really understand the trajectory that technologies will take. We wanted to explore a scenario where VR and AR explode into consumer life, and imagine how this would impact UI designers who've never worked with 3D environments.

          The real aim is to encourage more designers to give it a go if they're interested!

          0 points
          • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, almost 5 years ago

            That’s all great and I agree, but why the click-bait headline? Will AR really kill UI design?

            1 point
            • Sam ApplebeeSam Applebee, over 4 years ago

              We started with '... will kill UI as we know it today' but it was a bit bulky. Also we wanted to get people to engage in the conversation. And I'm pleased we did because there's been some brilliant points raised between here Medium and Dribbble. We'll be publishing a wrap-up next week taking rock of all our learning. All part of the experiment :)

              0 points
    • Sam ApplebeeSam Applebee, over 4 years ago

      Excuse my layperson speak, Marc, we're still figuring all of this out!

      RE screens

      - You're right a projected interface is still a screen. The point I'm trying to get at is that a contact lens which can display things right across your field of vision is very different from the edged displays we current use. In this case, I imagine apps to integrate much more fluidly with our 'real-world' experiences, rather than requiring our full attention when in use - as they mostly do on our smartphones and tablets today.

      RE designing for VR

      - My understanding is that in order to create an interface for use in a VR application, the rough process is: 1) design in 2d. 2) Model in 3D. 3) Code in Unity / Unreal.

      We wanted to try designing interfaces for VR and found that we couldn't just do it.

      If you've come across a way for designers to really easily implement an idea in 3D please share it!

      We're going to be putting some key questions and points from the design community to some VR experts - have you got anything that you'd like us to include, and would you be happy to be quoted in our wrap-up article?

      Thanks Marc!

      0 points
      • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, over 4 years ago

        The point I'm trying to get at is that a contact lens which can display things right across your field of vision is very different from the edged displays we current use.

        Different hardware, different experience using it, but ultimately the same or similar toolchain and skills.

        In this case, I imagine apps to integrate much more fluidly with our 'real-world' experiences, rather than requiring our full attention when in use - as they mostly do on our smartphones and tablets today.

        I agree and I think that’s the general trend for mainstream use. I don’t agree for all tasks though. There’s many things that are far better when immersive, with our full attention (video editing, games, design, writing etc).

        We wanted to try designing interfaces for VR and found that we couldn’t just do it.

        Yeah, a lot of the tools for VR and AR are in their infancy. I think a big part of the reason is because we don’t yet know the main useful practical applications.

        If you've come across a way for designers to really easily implement an idea in 3D please share it!

        As I’ve said, I think it’s important to recognise that a lot of UI for Hololens, Vive, Rift, Google Glass is really just 2D in a 3D space. I would also expect and hope many UI designers are already experimenting or using 3D tools.

        would you be happy to be quoted in our wrap-up article?

        Sure. I don’t know how much value my comments have, but I thought it important to note that AR and VR aren’t scary new worlds that will be destroying UI design as we know it. At best, they will augment it and many of the tools we use now will still be important.

        1 point
  • Riho KrollRiho Kroll, over 4 years ago

    User Interfaces will never be "killed" in my opinion. Surely there will be shifts in design patterns and in how it is displayed, and in which form. The only thing that is changing is the presentation and the tools used to build UI.

    There are more technical considerations to keep in mind, but overall the process of design doesn't change.

    I've been building UI for VR for the last year and a half now. The things that changed for me were: 1) New design patterns (or lack thereof) 2) Learning new tools (game engine, 3D tools) 3) Some new requirements and technical considerations 4) Prototyping and testing takes longer

    If you're curious about the stuff I was doing, here's a talk I gave about VR UI back in March: http://www.gdcvault.com/play/1023652/Building-3-Dimensional-UI-for

    1 point
    • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, over 4 years ago

      User Interfaces will never be "killed" in my opinion. Surely there will be shifts in design patterns and in how it is displayed, and in which form. The only thing that is changing is the presentation and the tools used to build UI.

      Yes, absolutely! Even purely natural language voice input will likely present results in a visual way. I don’t see the visual aspect of UI design going away ever. It may be augmented by new abilities, but it’s not going away.

      If you're curious about the stuff I was doing, here's a talk I gave about VR UI back in March.

      I am, and thanks!

      1 point
      • Sam ApplebeeSam Applebee, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

        Agree that we're not going to do away with stimulus from our most relied-upon sense. I suppose the question is that if sound, touch and other visual clues (not interfaces as such) become a much more central part of the way we interact with computers, will UI design - the most common way of interacting now - change beyond recognisable form? And if so, is it the same thing, really? Someone on Twitter called this progression a move 'toward full IxD'

        0 points
        • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, over 4 years ago

          Agree that we're not going to do away with stimulus from our most relied-upon sense.

          Arguably the highest data density, too. If you’re trying to jam as much information as possible from a computer into a human, doing it with dancing light is pretty high bandwidth.

          Definitely higher bandwidth than audio.

          0 points
    • Sam ApplebeeSam Applebee, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

      Awesome! What's your feeling about designers' readiness as a whole to adopt those new tools? You're on the bleeding edge, will others naturally follow do you think? And nice talk!!

      0 points
      • Riho KrollRiho Kroll, over 4 years ago

        Thanks, glad you enjoyed it. So for me the transition wasn't so difficult, because I had already been interested in 3D rendering (vray, 3dsmax). So going back to it wasn't a big leap. But I can definitely imagine designers having a hard time coming into these tools fresh.

        So I think that the tools need to improve, and I think when AR finally hits the mass market, it will drive demand for simpler and easier to use tools.

        I could be wrong in that, but I don't think there will be a mass adaptation of existing 3D tools such as 3dsmax, maya, etc. These tools are way overkill for UI. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect a UI designer to model a character in high-fidelity for example. There are professionals who have been doing that specific aspect of 3D and design for 20-30 years.

        So I think UI will in the future involve a lot more disciplines, instead of having one person do it all. Which has been my experience already. I've had to interact with 3D artists, animators, rendering programmers, level designers, and the list goes on.

        0 points
  • Taulant SulkoTaulant Sulko, over 4 years ago

    VR is still a screen and a user interface. It is just very close to your face. Different considerations still the same principles.

    1 point
  • Patrick SmithPatrick Smith, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    The screen is great because you can be absorbed by it, and then get back to the real world. It’s quite a manual device: you flick it on, engage with it, and then put it down. To take photos and video you have to explicitly press something. AR feels like it makes that automatic: it’s always on. Will most people want that? And will most people want to be around others with that?

    I honestly don’t think most people will care about 3D graphics or about it being integrated in their world. People want something that works well and that provides value to them, whether that’s interacting with friends, aids status, or allows consuming things of interest to them. What extra value does AR provide?

    The iPhone worked better and was easier to use than digital devices before it. How will AR work better and be easier to use?

    The smartphone was a better version of the mobile phone that most people had before, so it was an easy upgrade. An AR headset is a step beyond that, as it’s something totally new you have to wear. It will be seen as a geeky product I think.

    Our current devices support real life, AR seems like real life instead supports it, and VR feels like it supplants real life.

    0 points
  • iterati designiterati design, almost 5 years ago

    What a click-baity title!

    0 points