11 comments

  • Meng ToMeng To, over 5 years ago

    Thanks for posting this Emile-Victor!

    This project is a follow-up of the iOS 9 GUIs I released a few months earlier. 3 years ago, I couldn't imagine creating such complex vector illustrations in Sketch, but now that the vector tools have matured, combined with the awesome Magic Mirror Plugin, this is all possible.

    Happy to answer any question about the process! :)

    6 points
    • Joe Blau, over 5 years ago

      Your work is amazing.

      Thanks!

      2 points
    • Kurt MadsenKurt Madsen, over 5 years ago

      I'm curious what these donut charts/pie graphs are meant to represent. Can you shine some light on that for me?

      Screenshot

      0 points
      • Meng ToMeng To, over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

        YES! I was hoping that someone asked this. I did some research and the only thing I found was a donut script which didn't exactly do what I wanted.

        The way I did it was a lot more straightforward: you create the donut in Sketch, export that to SVG and extract the code. Then, you take the dasharray="450,900"(The dasharray values are the same in Sketch's border options), animate it in CSS using transition. That's it! https://designcode.io/cloud/sketch/CCzgdl3UUAAYFfu.mp4

        0 points
        • Kurt MadsenKurt Madsen, over 5 years ago

          But what do they mean? What is the 100% on these and how does it relate to the number you have in the middle of the donut?

          1 point
  • Emile-Victor Portenart, over 5 years ago

    Incredible work did Meng over here! And the landing page looks really nice, as usual!

    2 points
  • Brian A.Brian A., over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

    These are beautiful, but why is there never any love for Illustrator? All I see these days is "___ for Sketch". I get that it's the cool thing to use right now, but there are still some AI users out there... :\

    1 point
  • Rogli BogliRogli Bogli, over 5 years ago

    To be perfectly honest, I fail to see the utility of app mocks. They're nicely crafted, no doubt there, and it may just be me not needing them in my particular workflow, but I don't the the advantages of presenting app screens like this. I understand if you do this with t-shits prints, billboards and OOH ads, where you need to be able to present the visuals in their respective context. But an app is hands on, inches from your face, under your finger and how it looks from two seats over just has never been a selling point at all.

    It'd be great to hear how and why you all use mocks like these in your workflow.

    1 point
    • Brian A.Brian A., over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

      I think they're very valuable for marketing purposes. If I were to showcase an app on a marketing site, I'd definitely want a selection of device mockups for that "wow" factor. In my day-to-day work designing for corporate-level stuff, though, I rarely—if ever—use them.

      0 points
    • Meng ToMeng To, over 5 years ago

      They're absolutely for presentation purposes, specifically to app design. As you mentioned, T-shirts, prints, billboards would be the equivalent but for their respective fields (for example, t-shirt representing a t-shirt design).

      These mockups are great for showing multiple screens in a non-generic way. I believe that front-facing is the best way, but when you have to present more screens, it's good to alternate with more angles and different compositions. So these devices, along with their different shadows, device colors and compositions will help. Resulting images are often used in many places, especially today: Twitter, Facebook, Website hero images, Book cover, Dribbble image, App Store previews, Keynote presentations, etc.

      Hope this answers your question!

      1 point
  • Lukas Zajic, over 5 years ago

    Really great bundle!

    1 point