47 comments

  • Marc Olivier LapierreMarc Olivier Lapierre, over 4 years ago

    I understand that it's a brand, but it still feels so wrong. Especially the Instagram screenshot... James Foley, about to be executed, with "Jihad it coming" written underneath. How the f*** is that supposed to be funny? Show some respect.

    I'm sure his time and talent could've been put to better use...

    28 points
    • Weston VierreggerWeston Vierregger, over 4 years ago

      Agree on the Instagram thing. That image was striking in the worst way, but I admit to smiling at the knife-plus-happytears-emoji thing.

      Generally I found this post pretty hilarious up until that one point. The way it highlights the absurdness you see in branding exercises: putting circle overlays on the mark, tote bags, millennial model comps, etc... I think it's just a publicity stunt in bad taste, but not unethical.

      6 points
      • Marc Olivier LapierreMarc Olivier Lapierre, over 4 years ago

        I also thought it was a somewhat nice satire up until that picture. The t-shirt, tote bag and letter template made me feel uneasy, which I think was part of the point of this project. But using a real picture of somebody they executed and making a joke about it was just too much for me. I don't know how I would've reacted if I was in Foley's family.

        3 points
    • Nathan NNathan N, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

      If you're going to do something like this don't apologize for it. We need more people who aren't afraid of expressing controversial opinions in multimedia and design.

      edit: This was meant as a top level comment, oops.

      6 points
    • Mike Wilson, over 4 years ago

      I hate that this guy had to apologize for satire, no matter how dark and "distasteful." The internet is turning into an outrage factory. Everybody is bored and looking for things to get upset about. Our own taste for salacious click-bait is what made us click on the article. Yet, after getting exactly what we wanted, we then jump into the herd of faux-outrage to get more likes for parroting the prevailing view. It's absurd.

      Mockery and satire are some of the best tools we have for disarming extremist ideologies that takes themselves way too seriously. I wonder what kind of "faux-outrage" response Chaplin would have gotten from white yuppies if the internet existed when The Great Dictator was released.

      6 points
      • Joshua TurnerJoshua Turner, over 4 years ago

        I think the issue is that ISIS is very active online, and this post gave them tips/criticisms on how to more effectively engage with people.

        The Great Dictator didn't give suggestions on how to further the reach of Nazi Germany. Not to mention it was created before the world knew of the atrocities being committed.

        1 point
      • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago

        Mockery and satire are some of the best tools we have for disarming extremist ideologies that takes themselves way too seriously.

        Agreed, everyone in this thread would be doing themselves a favour if they watched the film 'Four Lions'

        3 points
    • Matt McDanielMatt McDaniel, over 4 years ago

      It's obviously in bad taste but "jihad it coming" made me laugh

      0 points
  • Alex MontagueAlex Montague, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    In his updated post:

    "On behalf of all graphic designers, my deepest apologies."

    What did we do?

    12 points
  • Duncan RussellDuncan Russell, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Guys, be chill. It's satire. Just read it:

    Because all content is black and white, the environmental footprint is small and professional death threats can be written with black toner alone.

    The point is to consider the ethical implications of the clients your work represents, and the author illustrates this with an extreme example (as you often do with satire).

    The iconography of terror is also an academic subject, and there's a fantastic book on the matter.

    12 points
  • Cody Iddings, over 4 years ago

    This "mock" post has powerful imagery, mockingly supporting the rebrand of a high-profile terrorist group.

    We, as designers, have great power in what we can create. We can use design to move people, motivate movements, and create organizations. Should we use design for people, movements, or organizations (in this case ISIS) that would enable or grow in the harm or destruction of others? Is it wrong?

    IMO, it's really black and white in this case. But what about pro-gun campaigns? Design for cigarette companies? Large-seed companies?

    10 points
  • Joshua TurnerJoshua Turner, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    If anyone else is late to the party like me, you can see a copy of the original post here.

    6 points
  • Michael GoldkampMichael Goldkamp, over 4 years ago

    Where is the original?

    5 points
  • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    To be fair their brand is absolutely solid. No need for a rebrand.

    4 points
    • Some DesignerSome Designer, over 4 years ago

      shut up.

      1 point
      • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

        Look into what design classics the Nazis gave us some time.

        "Good design" doesn't automatically come with ethics unless we impose them.

        Check out ISIS's official videos sometime, the fact the production values are so high is haunting and shows how much they realise media is also a battlefront in the modern world.

        Oryouknow,alternativelyjuststayinyoursafelittlebubble

        2 points
  • Jonathan SimcoeJonathan Simcoe, over 4 years ago

    I understand it is intended as satire. I just think it's in bad taste.

    4 points
  • Randall MorrisRandall Morris, over 4 years ago

    So controversial! Its like he wanted the attention or something?!

    He should take the next step and head over there to pitch them.

    3 points
  • Alex Dave, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Woah I'm really shocked you removed the content because of the pressure of an arbitrary morality. I'm living Paris and I know some victims who survived the attacks. I've been emotionally affected with those events but It doesn't mean we should leave any form of reason. The French government is becoming more and more totalitarian and today I'm more afraid of the French police than terrorists. So please do your sarcasm and make me laughing : this is the best therapy.

    Please post back your ISIS redesign !!

    2 points
  • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    i wouldn't call it unethical. i would call it a really offensive, shameful joke.

    2 points
  • Renee PRenee P, over 4 years ago

    i dunnooo, I don't have a problem with someone dissecting and analysing the 'brand'/flag, but mocking up an Instagram post with a guy about to be beheaded crosses the line for me. Not sure if that was mean to be humorous but I find it bad taste

    2 points
  • David Steelcart, over 4 years ago

    I'm Rad White, head of digital design at thebingbing(http://www.thebingbing.com/) and even this is cringe for me.

    2 points
  • Ryan RushingRyan Rushing, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Perhaps a hypothetical rebranding a terrorist organization is in bad form, but I don't think it's unethical, per se. The author is primarily looking at the formal qualities of the mark. Putting an ISIS t-shirt on an unsuspecting model, or adding the Instagram beheading is where this crosses the line for me.

    2 points
  • Irving TorresIrving Torres, over 4 years ago

    All I have to say is hats off to the author for creating something controversial that would slowly grab some attention and lead to exposure. I think this is simply what it is. No more, no less. He took this right out from the book "Trust Me I'm Lying" by Ryan Holiday.

    1 point
  • Laurens SpangenbergLaurens Spangenberg, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    There are dozens of amazing charities and non-profits that could highly benefit from a branding redesign to make them better known and more recognizable. Yes, this is technically satire that isn't suppose to be used, but neither are 99.9% of unsolicited redesigns that people do in their spare times.

    Of all the groups one could have chose to redesign, even for satire, this person chose this.

    1 point
  • Pedro PintoPedro Pinto, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    The original content of the post was removed?

    1 point
  • Nate DaubertNate Daubert, over 4 years ago

    Check out this book. Saw the author present at an AIGA NY Event a year or two ago. http://www.amazon.com/Branding-Terror-Logotypes-Iconography-Organizations/dp/1858946018

    1 point
    • Account deleted over 4 years ago

      Was gonna post this. It's a really interesting book! But I think the issue is where this book is research and his project really is just a bad joke in poor taste with no real commentary.

      0 points
  • Robin RaszkaRobin Raszka, over 4 years ago

    Bad joke

    1 point
  • Adam Giordano, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Does something either have to be ethical or unethical? I for sure don't think this is unethical. Is it in bad taste? Maybe, and only because of the mock James Foley Instagram post. This guy obviously had some time on his hands and wanted to ruffle some feathers. It's satire and I'm fine with that. If Anthony Jeselnik was a designer...

    1 point
  • Peiran TanPeiran Tan, over 4 years ago

    No.

    1 point
  • Mike DemaraisMike Demarais, over 4 years ago

    this seems like "material support for terrorism".. i would be concerned about a knock on your door @cody-iddings

    1 point
  • John LeschinskiJohn Leschinski, over 4 years ago

    It's a hypothetical rebrand. Not sure how ethics roll into this as it's not actually work done for a client. Just someone fixing a shitty flag, and researching terrorist breeding.

    1 point
  • Lucas ColussoLucas Colusso, over 4 years ago

    Such a horrible idea. Even though it is a satire, you have to be held liable for the outcomes of your work. I'm glad he removed the post.

    0 points
    • John LeschinskiJohn Leschinski, over 4 years ago

      What would the outcome be? You think ISIS is going to re-brand now and capture a larger share of the terrorism market?

      1 point
      • Lucas ColussoLucas Colusso, 4 years ago

        Yes, that might be one of the outcomes. Are you trying to rule out the power of branding in 2016? I thought the conversation had already moved on from this after companies like Coca-cola and Nike proved that branding is important (yes that is such a simple statement but your comment seem to deny that). ISIS is actually very clever in their branding and marketing efforts, using social media, video, and magazines. I think the design we are discussing only puts more wood in the fire.

        0 points
  • Nick ZakharNick Zakhar, over 4 years ago

    Reminds me of a pretty girl posting a picture of her boobies on instagram to get attention.. well done dude.

    Total waste of designer talent unless you are for the cause.

    Silly billy.

    0 points
  • Some DesignerSome Designer, over 4 years ago

    Of course not, oh my god... This is the lowest level I've ever seen in my professional life. Good for him actually. He might never get a job. that'll teach him a lesson. This guy cleary did a supporting job. And this is just unacceptable. How could you even think about to "clean design" for those freaks. Seriously, I can't think even straight to write. I'm furious.

    fucking idiot.

    0 points