23 comments

  • Adam Kirkwood, over 5 years ago

    What I liked

    Design Process

    I, myself, can really appreciate the thought behind the process framework as it is very structured and adaptive. Her design process feels very purpose-driven, rather than translating a wish list of features to pixels.

    The story behind the details

    I really appreciated how the case studies were structured and organized. It feels as structured and organized as her design process where it begins taking the abstract concepts and ideas to create concrete design deliverables and solutions.

    Communication is key

    Both the process and case studies are very well communicated. I believe it is extremely important to be thorough, yet succinct with communicating with your users, or in this case the reader. Every bit of the process is thorough and gives me a glimpse into the problem space being solved for.

    Not leaving empty handed

    Even though I learned about her process and the kind of problems she faced and solved, I left with a greater understanding of how a design process can be more structured yet flexible. How to drive a redesign of a mobile app from brand values to shipping using the atomic design ideology.

    My $0.02

    Although I did thoroughly enjoyed going through her work, I’m definitely not used to the depth that this portfolio reaches. I’m so used to seeing portfolios or Dribbble shots making up the majority of content, but this is definitely a breath of fresh air. I’m starting to think this is definitely a solid direction to consider when building a product design portfolio; a unique approach to depth and breadth of work from a talented designer.

    10 points
  • Andreas Ubbe Dall, over 5 years ago

    It's an interesting approach, but ultimately I feel like it misses the mark a bit.

    When you're in a hiring position you want as quick an overview as possible. I didn't find it easy to quickly get an insight into what your actual work on particular projects consisted of.

    I feel like many of these details such as process that are explained in your portfolio, are something that are much more appropriately discussed in a two-way dialogue / interview than this very one-sided presentation.

    Ultimately you are trying to sell yourself with your portfolio, and part of that means getting the initial wow-effect that will make people want to go in depth and learn more about you.

    Just my initial thoughts from viewing this, hopefully you can take something away from that :)

    6 points
    • , over 5 years ago

      Hi Andreas,

      Thanks so much for the feedback! Definitely valuable. I was a little conflicted with how to represent my design thinking. I wanted to try out a different way of portraying the journey I took in solving problems by telling it as a story. Hopefully that comes through clearly. I definitely agree that portfolios need the wow factor. Sometimes it is the visuals and sometimes it's the freshness of the way information is laid out.

      Again, thanks for your feedback! :)

      0 points
      • Art VandelayArt Vandelay, over 5 years ago

        Maybe it's worth testing out a TL;DR section at the top of each casey study to provide for the snapshot of the project?

        0 points
    • Joel CalifaJoel Califa, over 5 years ago

      Disagree with this completely.

      It depends on what you're optimizing for. Do you want to be hired into a role that prioritizes IA skills and systems thinking, or one that's looking for a kickass visual designer first and foremost? Both are legitimate, but how you choose to structure your portfolio is going to directly affect which of these gigs you'll have a better chance of landing.

      As a hiring manager, I look at dozens of portfolios every day and the truth is that they all look the same (in fact, most of them include a "my process" section too). They almost always try to push visual design first. Andreas is right in that hiring managers make snap judgements and don't have time to really look through portfolios, but wrong in what is going to successfully keep the right people on the page. It's not universal.

      From your portfolio, it looks like you care about strategy, process, and systems—so that's what you should worry about, and it'll resonate with the right employer. My portfolio had something around 10x the text and much less visual design, and it was extremely successful in generating interest in regards to roles I actually wanted.

      Keep at it!

      1 point
      • , over 5 years ago

        Thanks Joel! Really appreciate your feedback. I think it validates the reason why I've designed my latest portfolio in this way. I believe product designers should and have the opportunity to go behind just visual design or pretty pictures. Additionally, like you stated in the last part of your comment, this will hopefully resonate with the right employer. It may limit options but should pave the right path for me. Thanks tons!

        0 points
      • Andreas Ubbe Dall, over 5 years ago

        I didn't at any point mention visuals. I simply said it was difficult for me to get a quick overview, and that I thought it lacked a bit of a wow-effect; This doesn't necessarily mean that you would have to 'wow' the viewer with visuals, it could just as well be in terms of the content - I just didn't personally feel like this particular portfolio managed to do that.

        0 points
  • Karen Li, over 5 years ago

    I really enjoyed looking at your portfolio because of how informative it was-- as a junior designer, I feel that the structure of your portfolio lends a lot of credibility to your work by presenting yourself as someone who wants to teach what you know and share that knowledge in a well designed format. Definitely bookmarking for future reference!

    4 points
    • Lewis Jacobs, over 5 years ago

      I second this. It's extremely informative. It completely appeals to the logical side of design and problem solving. As Andreas Ubbe Dall mentioned it doesn't offer a quick overview which makes the depth a bit daunting. There's a ton of information and it sort of feels like work.

      On the other hand as a designer and not someone in HR I'm always intrigued by other designers process. To solve the problem of a summary vs depth..maybe implement what blogs or online stores do; a "more info" or "read more" type of thing.

      1 point
      • , over 5 years ago

        Thanks! Feedback like this is great because one of the things I was struggling with was the amount of depth to provide. Will take this into consideration :)

        0 points
  • Oleg Z, over 5 years ago

    The deep dive into your thought process is a welcome change and helps the portfolio to stand out. I would suggest to try and break out the projects into more bite sized pieces like you did with "Next Era..." Easier to retain info and feels less daunting to read.

    3 points
    • , over 5 years ago

      Thanks for the suggestions Oleg! I also felt conflicted about laying out the entire project on a single page. It starts to feel like reading a really long essay. Definitely taking your feedback into consideration. Thanks!

      1 point
  • Darren AlawiDarren Alawi, over 5 years ago

    The scrolling experience is broken on mobile.

    3 points
    • Adam Kirkwood, over 5 years ago

      @Darren That is an interesting comment.

      How many people out there actually believe design portfolios should 'support' the mobile experience? And how far down? Tablet? Phone?

      I find myself less worried about support for mobile considering smaller devices just because the quality is inherently limited by the viewing area.

      Thoughts?

      1 point
      • Dean HaydenDean Hayden, over 5 years ago

        I really do think that design portfolios should work on mobile right up to large desktop screens.

        If your case studies include responsive work then your site should reflect this. Practise what you preach.

        Looking at the case studies (love the content btw) on mobile was fine but the home page feels completely broken; not a good first impression for potential clients.

        1 point
        • , over 5 years ago

          Great feedback! I'm looking into the scrolling problem in the homepage. Hoping to polish up the code a little bit more. :)

          1 point
          • Dean HaydenDean Hayden, over 5 years ago

            Glad to be of help. Another little pointer… I would recommend using -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch; to smooth the scrolling of areas with any overflow.

            Implemented it on one project and it made a huge difference.

            2 points
        • Adam Kirkwood, over 5 years ago

          I can see your points as valid. My fear is that some visuals become too difficult to really see finer details on a mobile device.

          How do you handle such things?

          0 points
          • Dean HaydenDean Hayden, over 5 years ago

            Possibly have specific images for mobile highlighting details (I know that there maybe loading overheads).

            Chances are details can be seen when you pinch zoom; it's native and an expected behaviour.

            (@Becca Li you might want to let people do that)

            0 points
    • JC .JC ., over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

      I'm also getting double scroll bar in the Chrome browser. Am using the latest Mac OS on a 2015 MBP. Also am using a regular mouse.

      Edit: Just realize the double scroll bar happens when I hover an image on the homepage

      1 point
  • Robin RaszkaRobin Raszka, over 5 years ago

    The scrolljacking is absolutely horrible.

    1 point