23 comments

  • Rob GillRob Gill, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Ooo Kirby!!! ♥️♥️♥️

    8 points
    • , over 4 years ago

      Kirby is the best!

      1 point
      • Stele PetStele Pet, over 4 years ago

        Kirby does look nice. Another flat-file CMS solution is GRAV. I ended up going with that, and so far it just works. I wonder if anyone has experience with Kirby and GRAV?

        1 point
        • Alec LomasAlec Lomas, over 4 years ago

          I've used both, there are definitely pros+cons to them each. For example, I wish that Kirby would use Twig, but the way Grav handles front matter and blueprints for the admin panel is nowhere near as good as Kirby.

          1 point
  • Ed AdamsEd Adams, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    I would argue that Jekyll and Middleman don't count as content management systems. They're static site generators, in a way they can be used to manage content but it's not really the same. A client absolutely cannot use those, for example. I can use them to build my blog/portfolio/side projects, but that's not really what I might want a CMS for.

    I've heard good things about Craft, and Siteleaf v2's static site integration might be interesting as it'll reduce load times as it won't have to pull in template files to generate pages so CMS-powered sites will be as fast as static sites and I think that's really cool.

    However, for a complicated website (i.e., for any pages more complicated than just a content box full of text and images), WordPress + plugins will always be the reigning champion. WordPress has plugins for almost everything my clients want, and whenever there aren't plugins it's easy to write my own custom code or drop in Advanced Custom Fields to do what I need. The other systems just aren't on WordPress' level for complicated sites.

    3 points
    • , over 4 years ago

      I think it's important to ensure static site generators are seen as a viable alternative to a traditional CMS. If you have the technical abilities, they do a nice job of managing and organizing your content, which is the core function of a CMS.

      I can't argue with the fact that Wordpress works and gets the job done. I've used it successfully for many sites, but it usually ends up as an assembly of miscellaneous pieces and parts that don't always play nice together.

      1 point
    • Chase GiuntaChase Giunta, over 4 years ago

      I'd have to argue this is the same for Craft "has plugins for almost everything my clients want, and whenever there aren't plugins it's easy to write my own custom code". You can create very complicated sites with Craft CMS, and easily write your own plugins (which has made plugins popularity grow fast). I've developed a sports league site, which handles coach/athlete registration, team payments, athlete payments, custom cp for coaches to manage their team (and everything that entails), event creation for multiple event types, results input, and a very complicated stat system. It's very capable of creating complex sites, and I'd argue it would be better for the job than WordPress. WordPress, after all, is primarily a blogging platform that's been added onto. WordPress feels bloated, slow, and makes me cringe. If you're not a developer, then I could argue WordPress is the way to go, because it offers plenty of cookie cutter templates and enough plugins for every need that one doesn't work out for you, you can just try another.

      4 points
  • Weston Thayer, over 4 years ago

    Anybody know if there's a CMS that offers an editor capable of reviewing drafts before publishing? For example, could a page have an owner(s) that has to sign-off on any changes before they can be published.

    Obviously flat-file CMSs and static site generators can do this via Git, but I was looking for a more user-friendly solution.

    1 point
    • Adam Brenecki, over 4 years ago

      Wagtail has a moderation feature which allows you to restrict. I'm about 99% sure you can give users permissions on individual pages too.

      The downside with Wagtail is that you do need to be a Python/Django developer, or have one work with you, to set up your page models and such. If you do, it's great, but you can't just stand it up and throw templates at it like most of the ones in the linked article.

      1 point
    • Ed AdamsEd Adams, over 4 years ago

      I know there's another one but it has a very un-memorable name. Off the top of my head, I think Contentful does what you want.

      1 point
      • Weston Thayer, over 4 years ago

        Contentful is neat. I wish they told their story a little better, maybe a video would help. They mentioned real-time content editing with multiple people, but didn't show UI for it.

        0 points
        • Claus HollensteinerClaus Hollensteiner, over 4 years ago

          Thanks, glad to hear that! We actually used to have a video. It's super outdated in terms of visual style though. But we're aware that we have shortcomings in explaining our product. We're working on it :)

          1 point
          • Weston Thayer, over 4 years ago

            Thanks, good video. FWIW, under the Features section on your site, I'd expect screenshots and discussion of the admin interface mentioned in the video.

            0 points
    • Jodi WarrenJodi Warren, over 4 years ago

      You can do this out of the box on Craft and Wordpress. For instance, on Wordpress you could have a user who can create posts but not publish them. They would then need an editor to actually publish the live post. You can also get more fine-grained with permissions if you care to dig into it. There are quite a lot of publishing flow plugins out there, but I don't have much experience with them.

      2 points
      • Weston Thayer, over 4 years ago

        I'd be particularly interested in solutions that allow commenting, i.e. the editor can leave feedback, and the original author can make the updates, then resubmit for review.

        0 points
        • Andrew ZimmermanAndrew Zimmerman, over 4 years ago

          I don't know how this is done in Craft or WordPress, but in enterprise-level CMS systems, the commenting function is part of the workflow. For example, in OpenText 8, the workflow sends an email to editor when a story is ready for review. The editor clicks a link in the email and is taken to the page. She can then either update and publish directly, or provide comments which are then sent to the author via email when the editor checks the document back in.

          I don't recall how one of my employer's instances of SharePoint 2007 did the approval workflow, but I believe it was very similar.

          1 point
        • Jodi WarrenJodi Warren, over 4 years ago

          You can see the workflow in Craft with their demo store: https://demo.craftcms.com

          If you create a user who can access the admin panel and create posts, but can't publish, then that user will only be able to save drafts. An editor can go and edit their draft, leaving notes in a comments section. This will then get saved as a new draft. This can go back and forth until the editor publishes. All the drafts are versioned too. You can also create new drafts and keep the same workflow going after the post has been published.

          I've not personally used this in a production environment, but it seems like a nice workflow.

          0 points
    • Brandon KellyBrandon Kelly, over 4 years ago

      You can create drafts of entries with Craft CMS, and there's a simple permissions system that would enable certain users to create drafts without being allowed to actually publish live changes. You can play around with those features on our demo site.

      2 points
  • Andy KaAndy Ka, over 4 years ago

    Why no statamic?

    0 points
  • Kris KimKris Kim, over 4 years ago

    I chose Siteleaf as my portfolio site platform because I wanted to look cool :P. Been extremely happy with it (though it's been a while since last update), am looking forward to port my site over to v2.

    0 points
  • Andrew CowleyAndrew Cowley, over 4 years ago

    Any thoughts on Webhook? Seems like it has similar interface building systems to Craft.

    0 points
  • Alec LomasAlec Lomas, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Great article! I would recommend adding something like Harp or Metalsmith as NodeJS-based alternatives to Jekyll and Middleman's Ruby (even if they're not technically CMSs).

    That said, I personally am really looking forward to v2 of Siteleaf so I can develop a static site and still have an admin panel for clients! And also Kirby is amazing.

    0 points