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Ask DN: API-driven CMS

almost 5 years ago from , Front-end Developer

Has anyone used a api driven cms before?

I'm aware of contentful & prismic. But these seem expensive options. I also found Cockpit CMS, does anyone have experience with this system?

Wordpress has an REST-API but installing wordpress is pretty bloat and it seems to me like there should be a more simple option.

14 comments

  • Mike KrukMike Kruk, over 4 years ago

    Disclaimer: This is my own product.

    https://fridgecms.com/signup

    I've been running an API based CMS named Fridge for a few years now. I'm getting ready to open it up to the public, but haven't finished a marketing site and the pricing. Sign up is limited to a free plan.

    You should definitely check it out. It has documentation and API libraries for Ruby, Javascript, and PHP and a Jekyll plugin for building static sites. (https://github.com/fridge-cms)

    1 point
  • Chris Schagen, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Chris from Contentful here.

    "Seems like expensive option". We have

    • a free tier that should cover test and smaller projects, e.g. static sites and such
    • not on site: pro-bono plans for worthwhile causes (open source projects, charitable projects, community projects, etc)
    • not on site: a free agency plan so agencies can play around (some restrictions apply)

    Shoot us a note to see if we can work something out.

    1 point
    • Martijn RuiterMartijn Ruiter, over 4 years ago

      Hi Chris, i would be interested in the agency test plan,. How would contentful play out if used for multiple sites? Can we manage multiple sites from one account? Or should we get a new plan for every site?

      0 points
      • Chris Schagen, over 4 years ago

        About agency plan: Perfect, will tell our customer success team.

        @multiple sites: yes you can. We recommend using one "space" per site, space being a content repository.

        0 points
  • Declan de WetDeclan de Wet, over 4 years ago

    There is CosmicJS which is in private beta. It's slightly less expensive than Contentful and offers all of the same features (I have evaluated both). The UI could be cleaner, but I think this is true for Contentful as well. I do think that in an agency environment, Contentful would be the better option simply because it's more battle-tested in production, but for individual or small projects, CosmicJS suits fine. If you're using this for a statically rendered site, or a static/SPA hybrid, then you also have the option of hosting your site on Netlify and using netlify-cms., though this is still somewhat experimental.

    1 point
  • Roel van HintumRoel van Hintum, over 4 years ago

    Craft CMS has pretty good api support. It just needs some configuration before that works. Check out: https://github.com/pixelandtonic/ElementAPI

    1 point
  • Erik BeesonErik Beeson, over 4 years ago

    Contentful is the only one I've heard of before, but I haven't used it.

    There's plenty to not love about WordPress, but for all the faults, there's a lot of very practical reasons that it can be appealing: it's extremely well supported, it's mostly free, it's highly extensible, it's very easy to find people to work on it, etc.

    There seems to be a lot out there on this topic, and even work on a REST API that would likely make it more like Contentful to use.

    Let us know what you find! I'm interested in this too.

    1 point
    • Martijn Ruiter, over 4 years ago

      I've used the wordpress API before but it seems to me there should be a more simple solution.

      0 points
    • Roel van HintumRoel van Hintum, over 4 years ago

      Don't forget Wordpress is for blogging, it's not a cms. Using it as a cms can be a pain, for the developer and the person using the admin.

      0 points
      • Erik BeesonErik Beeson, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

        Have you actually had problems with using it as a CMS that's not a blog?

        Even the Wikipedia page seems unclear about the distinction between CMS and blog:

        WordPress Wikipedia

        0 points
        • Roel van HintumRoel van Hintum, over 4 years ago

          Setting up the data structure/fields isn't the prettiest thing in wordpress. There is no support for nested fields and it's hard to make links between different element types. Also creating new types requires to much code in my opinion. Since the question was a cms with api output, i would not recommend wordpress because the one thing asked (a cms) is not what it is designed to do. Personally i think the difference between a blogging platform and a cms is that a blogging platform is designed to have 1 entry type (the blogpost).

          From a programmers perspective i would definitely recommend something with better maintainable and good code. But if you really must, at least check out https://roots.io/

          0 points
      • Martijn RuiterMartijn Ruiter, over 4 years ago

        I've never used wordpress for blogging purposes only. With advanced custom fields and custom post types activated wordpress can act as a cms. But as stated wordpress was built as a blogging platform; This is why i am looking for a better solution.

        0 points
        • Roel van HintumRoel van Hintum, over 4 years ago

          I can recommend Craft as a cms, it works really nice. You can setup a dev environment for free. The major downside for now is that i haven't figured out yet how to do data migrations. There is migrations support for plugins, but no documentation on doing it for entry types, fields, etc.

          0 points