12 comments

  • Tom WoodTom Wood, almost 5 years ago

    Enjoyed this; and the same can be said of living in London.

    I'm about 10 years behind you, but there is no chance of owning in London. The norm is to rent, and if you want to buy, you have to move far enough out of the centre, yet not too far so that your commute isn't overly arduous.

    It's incredible how you can be so tied to a place for no real reason.

    2 points
    • Eric KarjaluotoEric Karjaluoto, almost 5 years ago

      How’s the rental market there? Residential vacancy rates are really low here, so buying became a bit of a necessity for us. (After 4 places in 5 years, we just wanted to leave our stuff in one place.)

      To me, the big challenge is in just shifting mindset. For so long we’ve believed that creativity is the domain of larger centers that we fail to look elsewhere. That said, with remote work and such, the time has never been better to look at other places.

      0 points
    • Ruban KhalidRuban Khalid, almost 5 years ago

      Rent prices are ridiculous in London, it's just insane. Buying a house is near impossible for someone in their early to mid 20's. The government should intervene and introduce rent control, but never will.

      1 point
      • Eric KarjaluotoEric Karjaluoto, almost 5 years ago

        There’s a lot of talk here about government intervention, but it’s a tricky situation. If they get involved, they might do more damage than good.

        0 points
  • Febril CuevasFebril Cuevas, almost 5 years ago

    Hey Eric,

    I'm a designer in my very early 20's, born and raised in Vancouver and I share similar sentiments about the city. There really is a lot to love about the city, just as you mentioned in your blog post. I may not currently be looking but I'd love to one day own a home in Metro Vancouver, at the moment however, it seems like a pipe dream. It's the same for most of my friends, especially the ones currently in University. Most of them are already looking for alternatives to Vancouver.

    In terms of the creative landscape in Vancouver, I find that there isn't a whole lot to get excited about. I agree with, "It’s a picturesque city made up of glass shoeboxes—but a creative hotbed? I’m not so sure.", It's slowly getting there though.

    As pessimistic as I sound, I'm looking forward to the future and hopefully the situation improves soon.

    2 points
    • Eric KarjaluotoEric Karjaluoto, almost 5 years ago

      I can’t see much changing this situation. If government intervenes and puts limits on house purchases, they tank the market for those who already own. And if they do nothing, prices could just keep going.

      The big point of my post isn’t that Vancouver should change. It’s that there are lots of alternatives that are worth considering. Vancouver’s a nice city, but this is a huge province with lots to offer. :-)

      1 point
  • Chris GillisChris Gillis, almost 5 years ago

    This is a great post - two things I hear resonating through the article are; Nature & Time. I would look for some place that allows both of those for you and your family. As a designer in my 40's as well, I did the same about 8 years ago. I now work remote and am entrenched in a natural setting. Absolutely love it and would never move back to a city., just some thoughts.

    1 point
    • Eric KarjaluotoEric Karjaluoto, almost 5 years ago

      Glad to hear that you’ve had that experience—and you’re right, both of things are important to me. Another one that’s big, is proximity to family. My parents are getting older, and I’d love to be near them, while they’re still healthy and able to do things.

      That combination of things is what really motivates me to leave Vancouver. I’d love to hop on my bike in the afternoon, ride 5 minutes to a trail, and meet my dad, there. (Admittedly, when I was 20, this wasn’t nearly as important to me as it is now.)

      Where did you move to?

      0 points
      • Chris GillisChris Gillis, almost 5 years ago

        Yeah most of my family lives here as well - that's important to consider, and I do meet up with my Dad for surfs in the summer. Moved from Boston to half way out on Cape Cod, Ma. I didn't grow up here but knew the area very well before making the move.

        Looks like you are ready for the move.

        0 points
  • Bryan KulbaBryan Kulba, almost 5 years ago

    My view of Vancouver is a mix of "this place is so awesome" and "who the fuck can afford to live here?!?"I have seen a lot of my friends move to Vancouver, not just for design, but for music, film or other creative pursuits. It's a hard life when you need to make so much money to just stay housed.

    I recently paid off my mortgage and am free and clear. It's hard to meet incredible creatives from Vancouver who are my age and either still renting an apartment or paying too much for a townhouse mortgage. Breaks my heart to see those struggles.

    Every city has its troubles, though. My city is far from perfect and though it's fairly cheap to live, work has shriveled as oil has dropped. It's not a struggle to find work, but there can be lean months. In the end, you have to figure out what you value and make choices around those values.

    1 point
    • Eric KarjaluotoEric Karjaluoto, almost 5 years ago

      It’s certainly a weird spot to be in. That’s part of why we still haven’t moved. Both my wife and I have lived here for long enough for it to feel like home. So, we’re slow to make a change.

      And I certainly agree with you: no place is perfect. If we move to a smaller place, I’ll surely miss some of the things we have available to us, now. (Especially the food.)

      I think what’s weird for me is how defensive folks in Vancouver get, about this city. It’s as though people here don’t want to admit that there are other places in the province, and beyond.

      Sure, some have rough edges or other shortcomings—however, they’re not un-livable.

      0 points