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Client Logo Deliverables

almost 5 years ago from

Can you give me a breakdown of what you include in the logo package you send to clients. I found an example here, but would like to know if this is the norm. Thanks!

5 comments

  • Richard SisonRichard Sison, almost 5 years ago

    As a starting point I'd go vector formats in all versions (AI or PDF), and high and low resolution versions for JPG and PNG. That's something that they'll be able to hand off to other designers and use pretty flexibly.

    Anything they need beyond that they can just ask. But I've never needed to send more than that (I've received more requests for sending the logos again than more versions…!).

    In addition to that, just supply a guide to the logos so they know when to use which. Having all that choice can be confusing depending on the client's savviness.

    Hope that helps.

    5 points
  • Adam Hayman, almost 5 years ago

    That's a pretty good example but possibly a bit overkill. I generally provide .EPS, .AI, and .PNG in each colorway (generally full color, one color, and white)

    Haven't had any complaints so far!

    2 points
  • Stephen Piercey, almost 5 years ago

    This article via Medium outlines some great advice. Especially surrounding common issues with knockout versions. Cheers!

    https://medium.com/art-marketing/a-designers-guide-to-creating-logo-files-ab91f05c72c4#.94umy5e2a

    www.dribbble.com/discoarcade

    0 points
  • Ragnar FreyrRagnar Freyr, almost 5 years ago

    I used to deliver ALL THE FORMATS! Now I just deliver CMYK and RGB Illustrator files along with a PFD preview file. (Sometimes I make a favicon.ico if the mood strikes me!) If the client ever needs more, I am happy to provide. :)

    0 points
  • Mig JMig J, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

    Depends on the client and how the brand lives but usually for a typical brand job that's print and digital I'd do:

    PDF and/or AI (in PMS, RGB and CMYK), High Res Transparent PNG (in RGB), Very High Res Tiff (in CMYK),

    And then do the same for a mono and reversed version.

    Including the recommended clear space around the logo as transparent pixels helps avoid a lot of bad logo placement. Also including a txt file saying which format is used where, and who to contact before becoming a cowboy in fucking Paint.

    0 points