4 comments

  • Bryant HughesBryant Hughes, over 3 years ago

    What design is, in an ideology free version of this definition, would be to make results. [...] We would be coming up with what to create in the first place.

    I don't disagree that the article yesterday had some phrasing that could misconstrue the value designers bring to the table. But just as the previous article was somewhat dismissive of that value, the statement here does the same thing skewed from a designers point of view. To be honest, this statement is just as frustrating as the statements the previous article was making, placing too much value on the contributions of a designer.

    From the article yesterday, to assume that any "business guy" is able to pop open sketch and create something that is immediately aesthetically pleasing, usable, and delivers value, dismisses the value designers provide.

    However in this article, for a designer to think that them going to art school makes them the person to "come up what to create in the first place", is terribly incorrect. What about going to art school and learning about graphic design makes you more qualified to analyze market opportunities, decide on customers to target, and provide insight on the value-add within your product's niche, any more than someone with a business degree could?

    As the article yesterday mentioned

    “The future belongs to those who learn more skills and combine them in creative ways.” Robert Greene — Mastery

    This is my biggest take away.

    If you're a business guy who is comfortable poping open sketch, great, you can communicate better with designers. If you're a designer who understands the intricacies of bringing a product to market, great, you'll be able to collaborate better with your CEO and product managers.

    Lets all be proud of the skills we possess and be appreciative of the skills others do.

    2 points
    • Laurens Spangenberg, over 3 years ago

      I'm just a guy that currently in art school with much to learn. Thanks for your thoughtful comment.

      I can agree on my viewpoint being somewhat narrow as I have little experience regarding the business of design.

      To address your point on art school, the title actually has less to do with the post, and is only phrased in such a way to suggest it being a response to the previous article. What I did want to suggest in the article, however, was that as UI designers we should learn from the hundred years of wisdom cultivated by graphic and industrial designers instead of brushing it away like the previous article. This doesn't necessarily require going to art school.

      I'm usually not a fan of clickbait articles and usually would have gone with something more neutral in other scenarios.

      0 points
      • Bryant HughesBryant Hughes, over 3 years ago

        What I did want to suggest in the article, however, was that as UI designers we should learn from the hundred years of wisdom cultivated by graphic and industrial designers.

        I absolutely agree there!

        0 points
  • Nic TrentNic Trent, over 3 years ago

    Totally agree. A good example of this sentiment is the success of Bloomberg.com. They hugely increased digital readership by doing alternative, off-the-wall niche designs and illustrations.

    This portfolio of one of their designers says more "art school" than "designer" to me, and I love it: http://paralleluniver.se/

    0 points