14 comments

  • Daniel GoldenDaniel Golden, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Whenever I see "[insert industry standard] killer". My immediate thought: It'll be gone in two weeks.

    6 points
    • Ashley Watson-Nolan, over 4 years ago

      Mostly intended as a link-bait title, rather than a serious judgement!

      Sass is going nowhere anytime soon, but I do think PostCSS offers an interesting alternative that could be quite powerful. It definitely won’t be gone in 2 weeks ;)

      1 point
  • Jodi WarrenJodi Warren, over 4 years ago

    This was pretty much my conclusion with it too.

    There's also something to be said for a static preprocessor. Personally I'm working an many client sites at any one time. Sass has been stable enough that I can confidently and easily use similar techniques in entirely different situations. I guess that if I was only maintaining one product like you are at JE, I'd feel much more confident about moving forward with modular technology to suit my specific situation.

    2 points
    • Ashley Watson-Nolan, over 4 years ago

      Exactly. If it was just me working on a project, I’d use my Sass setup simply because I can control the code I output from it.

      It will be interesting to see what plugins people create with PostCSS as if more essential plugins like Autoprefixer are created then it will become an even more attractive for devs to use in the future.

      2 points
  • Gigiel ProsGigiel Pros, over 4 years ago

    I think PostCSS will be the future of frontend development. Also Mark Otto(@mdo) recently said that bootstrap 4 will be written in PostCSS.

    2 points
    • Ashley Watson-Nolan, over 4 years ago

      Yeh, I think it’s definitely getting there – as more plugins become available it’ll be interesting to see what people build with it.

      I think the real challenge will be ensuring that developers use the freedom they get with PostCSS wisely – but this is a similar challenge to ensuring people have used Sass/Less responsibly in the past.

      0 points
    • Rasmus ErikssonRasmus Eriksson, over 4 years ago

      Pretty sure he said Bootstrap 4 is written in Sass and any future versions will likely use PostCSS. Unless he stated otherwise later?

      2 points
    • Dan CoatesDan Coates, over 4 years ago

      Unless he has since mentioned otherwise I'm pretty sure that was just an offhand remark referencing how fast moving frontend workflow tools are these days.

      0 points
  • Bobby AndersonBobby Anderson, over 4 years ago

    What's Sass?

    2 points
  • Crampa ...Crampa ..., over 4 years ago

    Honestly what is wrong with native css? Stop making your CSS/UI overly complicated.

    0 points
    • Ashley Watson-Nolan, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

      The idea of PostCSS is that it can be as simple or complex as you like. If there’s only one feature you want to add to your standard CSS, you can just add that, rather than having a whole heap of other features you don’t need too.

      2 points
  • Ghaida ZahranGhaida Zahran, over 4 years ago

    The great thing about PostCSS is the planned obsolescence. It's meant to bridge the gap to CSS4 spec, which means you can write plain ol' CSS, without having to write non-standard preprocessor code.

    I love Sass but this is very exciting indeed.

    0 points
  • Sarah RobinSarah Robin, over 4 years ago

    Thanks for this - I've been hearing about PostCSS for a while now, nice to have a good introduction to it. Dunno if I'll switch, but definitely curious.

    0 points