35 comments

  • Mike Wilson, 5 years ago (edited 5 years ago )

    From the beginning Ello hasn't been a well designed experience...nor is the product itself really a good idea. I think we already had this discussion a year ago, it's an easy target.

    While I agree with a lot of what the author said, this article leaves a really bad taste in my mouth. He basically just shit all over somebody else's work with lots of attitude as if speaking from authority...but I see he is a student with no experience on a major product team. Nothing wrong with that, we've all been one, but I think taking a more humble approach would be better received. Tearing down what somebody else has built to try and build yourself up...and at the end saying "I'm looking for opportunities, here's my portfolio!" isn't the right way to build up your profile in the industry.

    A few weeks ago there was a post about a student who did a site for the international flag of planet earth or something like that. It got massive amounts of coverage because it was really well done. I think that is the kind of positive attention you want to get as a student.

    26 points
    • Earl CarlsonEarl Carlson, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

      Right there with you on this.

      It's terribly easy to be cynical. Unfortunately, there is already a lot of that in our industry.

      I'd much prefer to see amazing design thinking (especially when hiring), than critical essays on how some other designer has failed.

      6 points
    • Benjamin Berger, 5 years ago

      Hi, thanks for your feedback and opinion.

      This is exactly the sort of feeling I wanted to avoid. That is why I started my review with a note explaining my goal while writing this.

      The aim was for me to analyze a famous product, give my thoughts and see if I could have done better. You said well, I am still young in the work, so it is a way to challenge my skills.

      But my intention was never to denigrate the work of others.

      Maybe my sarcastic tone is too strong and feels inappropriate. So I will rephrase some sentences.

      Benjamin Berger

      4 points
      • John PJohn P, 5 years ago

        At least you didn't go as far to nitpick about a shade of blue they used like some people did..

        2 points
      • Mike Wilson, 5 years ago

        Hi Benjamin, I'm sorry for calling you out, I think it was the tone that turned me off. Like I said, a lot of the flaws you pointed out were definitely there. I see you revised it, and it definitely reads like a fair criticism instead of an attack now.

        I think what bugged me most about the last version was the part at the end where you attacked the designer's portfolio and accused them of being print-only. Nothing about being awesome at print design excludes you from being awesome at product design. Deciding which corner to place the hamburger button isn't quite heart surgery...heh

        5 points
        • Benjamin Berger, 5 years ago

          Yes, I totally understand that it was misplaced. My intention was not to "attack" their portfolio. What I wanted to express was that being awesome at print design (because they are) does not make you awesome at digital design. And the other way is true as well, knowing how to design on digital does not make you good at branding and print design.

          I wanted to say that these are two different work. Probably the wrong way.

          Anyway, I removed the article. To me, writing is about having fun and trying to inspire. Here, it ended up trashing a product and discrediting my thoughts.

          I will be more careful next time.

          Thanks for your comments though!

          0 points
      • Sven LoskillSven Loskill, almost 5 years ago

        This is exactly the sort of feeling I wanted to avoid. That is why I started my review with a note explaining my goal while writing this.

        You’re young, you’ll learn, all cool. But please take away from this that stating “I don’t want to call you out“ before calling someone out is still calling someone out.

        0 points
    • Wentin ZWentin Z, almost 5 years ago

      I agree some of the mean, sarcastic tone could be spared, I don't think it is fair to judge people differently based on their experience, junior or senior. Senior designers don't get a free pass on being mean to others, either. Discredit someone by looking up their portfolio/resume, finding out they are junior and then point out they are not humble enough is not healthy, either.

      4 points
  • Atif AzamAtif Azam, almost 5 years ago

    What's this growing trend of young designers who feel the need to critique and put down the work of other designers? It's kinda gross and just seems like a way for insecure designers to "prove" their own design chops or gain recognition of some sort. Just do good work and be on your way. It's not a competition. Yikes.

    11 points
    • A B, almost 5 years ago

      It's the industry. More and more hiring managers want designers to blog. You reap what you sow.

      4 points
      • Atif AzamAtif Azam, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

        True. I have no problem with a designer writing about their craft, but putting down the work of other designer's for self-recognition seems low. I would never hire a designer who has that urge.

        4 points
    • Benjamin Berger, almost 5 years ago

      Alright guys, I took your critics into account and changed my article (title, rephrase sentences, removed some parts).

      Once again, this was just an exercise for me, to take a fresh product and analyze it. To share my opinion on what could be improved. Some people have done it to my work as well (you have just done it actually) and this way I learn my mistakes, evolve and improve.

      Here's my lesson : won't be publishing this kind of post again :)

      1 point
      • A B, almost 5 years ago

        My intention was not to dismiss your article. Critiques are critiques. Some come off harsher than others. That's just how it is. I don't think you should be dissuaded from posting stuff like this in the future. Without critiques there would be no discussion.

        2 points
        • Benjamin Berger, almost 5 years ago

          No big deal, I removed this one because it created a mood I did not want to. I will take some time to rewrite and improve the article and publish a new one :).

          1 point
    • Account deleted almost 5 years ago

      Because writing words is easier than actually having to design something.

      3 points
  • Matt RothenbergMatt Rothenberg, 5 years ago

    At the risk of sounding pedantic, I wonder if "Ello says Goodbye to UX" is an appropriate title for this article.

    UX isn't some binary "thing" that exists or doesn't exist. And I worry that framing a team's design decisions through this lens is dangerously unproductive. While I agree with much of the authors' critique, I think a better description would have been something to the effect of "The designers at Ello made some choices that are detrimental to the end user experience."

    I'm of the mind that, on an integrated product team, UX is everyone's responsibility (that means you too, Ms. Software Engineer). And with that said, UX may better be described to exist on a spectrum that runs from negative to positive. When we frame it is as existent or non-existent, it may inadvertently give the impression that we designers "possess some ineffable magic fairy dust that nobody else can wrap their heads around" (h/t: http://bit.ly/1FwxpTR)

    8 points
    • Corin EdwardsCorin Edwards, almost 5 years ago

      Sure, if you want to expand the definition of something so wide as to preclude it from having any meaning then, like all other words divorced of their meaning, it's an inappropriate word

      1 point
      • Matt RothenbergMatt Rothenberg, almost 5 years ago

        Totally hear you, and I just want to re-iterate that reframing the term "user experience" (a term that, as you've insinuated, has been utterly beaten into semantic submission) in less polar terms makes for more objective critique and discussion.

        1 point
  • Martin LeBlancMartin LeBlanc, 5 years ago

    Ello's UI is the worst. It looks like it was designed by a print designer. Oh wait ...

    8 points
  • Noe AraujoNoe Araujo, almost 5 years ago

    Whatever dude. I hate this kind of post, you people always complaining about EVERYTHING

    6 points
  • Joe BlauJoe Blau, 5 years ago

    Does anyone have a link to the original article?

    5 points
  • David McGillivrayDavid McGillivray, almost 5 years ago

    'looking for a full-time job'

    So yeah, this isn't the way to get one.

    4 points
  • John PJohn P, 5 years ago

    Let's be honest, at this point the Ello app could have been the second coming of Christ and Medium posters would still go through it with a fine toothed comb and find something they disliked about it.

    It feels to me there is a consensus to crap on Ello because the UI design community doesn't feel their overnight success was "earned".

    3 points
    • Benjamin Berger, 5 years ago

      You may be right, but this was not my intention here. I wrote about Ello just like I could have written about any other product (which I will probably do btw).

      0 points
    • Jesse C.Jesse C., almost 5 years ago

      It wouldn't surprise me if a lot of them are still bitter about not having been invited quickly to the closed beta.

      1 point
      • John PJohn P, almost 5 years ago

        Definitely saw a lot of Twitter bigshots whinging about it for not being invited early enough to get their short handles.

        1 point
  • Nick Sloggett, almost 5 years ago

    Where all of this falls a bit short is pretty simple. You're going to actively tear something apart, then you should design solutions to all issues before coming to the table and complaining or critiquing. The best thing our industry can do is learn to bite their tongue unless they are willing to help. This feels like a "I'm going to critique something thats popular in hopes to get seen and help the search for a job/search ranking" honestly.

    2 points
  • Daryl GinnDaryl Ginn, almost 5 years ago

    When did they ever say hello to UX?

    2 points
  • Spencer HoltawaySpencer Holtaway, almost 5 years ago

    It's not going to go away, is it? :-(

    1 point