39

CC2015 is so bad I bought a copy of Sketch.

over 4 years ago from , http://meet-cristian.com

For all the feedback Adobe is getting, they still don't seem to understand what their customers are actually using their software for (hint: it's not drawing with butterfly shaped brushes on top of a 2 image collage created on an iPad).

When I first got to try the beta a few weeks ago, like so many other designers whose input Adobe wanted, I thought the features looked promising and was assured that this was an early version and the experience/performance will improve.

One month later, Adobe has released the same laggy mess without any notable improvements. Are art-boards a good idea? Sure. Just imagine how it will all work when making a few of them in a raster graphics editor. Hell, make two blank ones and see how even scrolling becomes laggy.

While I am not switching to Sketch, I would like to have one design tool in my computer that doesn't lag when I create a second art-board or turn making even the smallest changes to complex documents feel like I'm working on a Powerbook.

I will conclude by saying that I agree with @Jon Myers's point - that we need well crafted, efficient software, tailored to our field and built from the ground up to take advantage of the powerful computers that we have, not some 20 year old pile of crap Adobe keeps putting sprinkles on hoping someone will love it.

106 comments

  • Sean SchraederSean Schraeder, over 4 years ago

    Because you are young and don't know what you don't know yet. Experience brings complexity. Sketch is simple because it is basic, but is it a mirage. The world is complex and requires level adjustments and pixel tweaks. Vector is clean, the world is messy. Namaste.

    74 points
    • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

      I disagree. The way forward is figuring out a way to turn the complex into something simple, fresh and innovative.

      Experience, in our ever evolving world, is useless if the best you can do with it is the same thing over and over again.

      17 points
      • Sean SchraederSean Schraeder, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

        BDUF aka Big Design Up Front aka the big bang should only happen once. Then let data and metrics take over. Nature is Evolution. Evolution is iteration. Starting over is like having a hissy fit, burning all the libraries and wondering why you have to reinvent the wheel.

        11 points
        • Rob KnightRob Knight, over 4 years ago

          I don't expect Adobe to "start over," but how about improving existing workflows? I can't remember the last time I used "save for web" in Photoshop without then needing a second app to make the output file truly web-ready. I've not yet used CC 2015, but I assume SVG export from Illustrator still puts Adobe metadata cruft in the header? These are canary-in-the-coalmine features that could be improved so web designers at least get a sense Adobe is thinking about what they need in 2015.

          0 points
          • Evan DinsmoreEvan Dinsmore, over 4 years ago

            Maybe you should try it before assuming.. especially since Save for Web is now depreciated. I just exported an SVG directly from Photoshop, no cruft. They added artboards. They updated layer styles. They're working on a streamlined UI that's more focused towards UI design. How is that not improving existing workflows?

            8 points
        • David G. Trinidad, over 4 years ago

          Well, this young designer its telling you, THATS its not an excuse for a design software in 2015 to behave like THIS: http://f.cl.ly/items/0T030x0j0p1u1y2g1e3O/60fps-PSCC2015-slow.mp4

          12 cores CPU, 2GB GPU and 64GB of RAM, should not be requirement and its what I do have, yet, the performance its like im using an smartphone.

          Affinity Designer actually works much faster than PS does, and have as many features, but it lacks some fine details thats its not making me using it daily, so, I don’t know what excuse Adobe have other than their incompetence.

          0 points
    • Florian GrauFlorian Grau, over 4 years ago

      Telling someone he's wrong, because he allegedly lacks experience, but demonstrating the exact same thing one sentence later (Sketch is a mirage) is one hell of a start for having a productive discussion.

      25 points
    • Julio Estrada, over 4 years ago

      Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man.

      4 points
    • Josh LeeJosh Lee, over 4 years ago

      Don't tell me that you use anymore than like $65 of your Ps suite. Don't say Namaste after coming across like a douche without a cogent argument to what he was talking about.

      4 points
      • Sean SchraederSean Schraeder, over 4 years ago

        Sorry for seriously harshing the mellow. I was extremely intoxicated last night as I live in Chicago and we just won the Stanley Cup, not an excuse just a plausible explaination.

        Apologies.

        Sketch is awesome, I like to see competition in the tools space. Maybe I am sentimental and comfortable with PS, plus it's helped me make my living. I can't wait for the day we get a gui prototyping tool/framework/ide that generates production ready code and easy data bindings.

        9 points
        • Josh LeeJosh Lee, over 4 years ago

          Well...now I feel bad ha ha ;)

          I totally understand getting wasted and writing things that come across poorly.

          Thanks for explaining.

          3 points
        • Chris SlowikChris Slowik, over 4 years ago

          ONEGOAL

          1 point
        • Dariusz FrączykDariusz Frączyk, over 4 years ago

          The best thing is that adobe already had that kind of tool and it was Fireworks. All it needed was a little more love from Adobe , instead they kill it!!!

          1 point
          • Sean SchraederSean Schraeder, over 4 years ago

            I think Adobe should name their Fireworks replacement, 'Razor'.

            0 points
            • Maak Bow, 4 years ago

              Now i see where this is coming from....an ex fireworks user? I'm not sure Adobe ever understood Fireworks. The speed of the Fireworks interface is awesome. Building a similar interface in HTML 5 may or may not become laggy, but html rendering is an absolute must IMHO (BTW.. it still works and is rock solid on windows).

              0 points
  • Robert AniteiRobert Anitei, over 4 years ago

    At least PS it's available on Windows, too. Not everyone has a mac.

    33 points
    • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

      That is true.

      5 points
    • Tori ZTori Z, over 4 years ago

      True.I used to intern at a Giant and at that time, they force everyone to use Thinkpad. This is super painful... They start to give designer team Macs after I left.

      1 point
    • Nathan HueningNathan Huening, over 4 years ago

      Sure. But why wouldn't you want the best tools / machine available to do your job? Why deliberately handicap yourself with the dearth of great software options on Windows when with a Mac, you get all the rich software plus can virtualize Windows alongside?

      0 points
      • Robert AniteiRobert Anitei, over 4 years ago

        I agree that the Mac it's more stable and fast but it is also expensive, at least in Romania where the average salary is ~600 euro.

        2 points
        • Dirk HCM van BoxtelDirk HCM van Boxtel, over 4 years ago

          More stable? Sorry but my PC's haven't really crashed since... well to be honest, I don't recall. Probably years ago.

          0 points
        • Nathan HueningNathan Huening, over 4 years ago

          That's fair. Not being able to afford the best tools doesn't mean failing to recognize that not all tools are created equal, so I'll concede the global currency arbitrage point.

          Corollary: It also means not failing to recognize that there's no metric for which a Windows box -- hardware, software, ecosystem, resale value, App store -- isn't an inferior tool.

          0 points
        • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

          A mac is not that much more expensive when you consider you don't have to pay for the OS, don't have to buy an AV or office software. The rest of the cost is justified by the support you get, better looks and technologies, etc.

          p.s. I'm also Romanian, I remember breaking the bank to buy my first mac.

          2 points
      • Nathan NNathan N, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

        You can do everything you stated above with a PC... Creative Cloud is cross-platform and if you know what you're doing you can build a hackintosh.

        edit: Not to mention with better specs for cheaper than the cost of an IMAC or MBP

        1 point
    • Nathan NNathan N, over 4 years ago

      On the same note this is the single biggest reason I'm not fully committing to Sketch. I love the app and it has a great community but it doesn't support Windows and probably never will. This wouldn't normally be an issue since I've used macbooks for the past six years but I've gotten tired of paying for overpriced laptops.

      0 points
  • Ryan MurphyRyan Murphy, over 4 years ago

    While I am not switching to Sketch

    That's that then.

    31 points
  • Sam SolomonSam Solomon, over 4 years ago

    The tools are better at different things.

    If you only have one option, take Photoshop. You can do nearly every design related task with it. It is the Swiss Army Knife of the design world.

    On the other hand if you spend most of your time fiddling with interface layouts. Sketch is much faster and has fewer, better tools (although now some of those are appearing in photoshop).

    It's a Swiss Army Knife vs a Machete. If you're clearing brush, which will you choose? Sketch costs two months of CC, I'd say if you're an interface or product designer it is well worth it.

    15 points
  • Tom WoodTom Wood, over 4 years ago

    Ah this old debate.

    The best designer will not limit themselves to one tool. There is an aspect to design which is being a mechanic or a builder, sometimes you need a hammer and sometimes you need wrench.

    If you're designing a site you need to use Sketch and Photoshop, and (you won't believe this) Illustrator too.

    Then you can use tinypng to make your images smaller.

    It's silly to have this "A is better than B" debate.

    12 points
    • Ben MJTBen MJT, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

      Edit: Just realised you meant for assets. nvm.

      If you're designing a site you need to use Sketch and Photoshop, and (you won't believe this) Illustrator too.

      Don't be a sith. This isn't entirely true. I haven't used any of them for my last 3-4 projects.

      0 points
    • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, over 4 years ago

      I have never used Photoshop to design a site. Ever.

      I prefer a pure vector tool by far. The Transform panel in Illustrator basically prevents me from going back to Photoshop.

      2 points
      • Tom WoodTom Wood, over 4 years ago

        I've never used Photoshop for the UI elements, but sometimes the hero images require photo manipulation which is a PS job. Or any other image on the site.

        For me designing a website is all of the work. It's not just the vector layouts, or designing in browser. It's all the work that has to go in to the final piece.

        0 points
        • Cristian MoiseiCristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

          Tools like Pixelmator (again mac only, sorry), can handle the image manipulation side beautifully. It's fast, it's beautiful, it's affordable and they could even bring it to the iphone and ipad.

          This goes to prove that having specialised tools, built using modern technologies is the way to go.

          0 points
        • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, over 4 years ago

          If I'm editing an image, I will use Photoshop. That's what it's good for. Edit it, export it, use it in your UI program.

          0 points
    • Evan DinsmoreEvan Dinsmore, over 4 years ago

      I've never used Sketch for a website, and I rarely use Illustrator. There's a lot of tool overlap. Depending on your workflow/preferences you don't need them all.

      2 points
  • Diego LafuenteDiego Lafuente, over 4 years ago

    I wish we see Skala this year, but it's like the Duke Nukem of UI design software :D, we will see it someday, in the future.

    12 points
    • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, over 4 years ago

      Thanks. We’re working as fast as we can. :)

      31 points
      • Bruno BarrosBruno Barros, over 4 years ago

        I'm really hyped by Skala, but the lack of artboards frighten me. I'm not sure if I'm ready to deal with another 1.0 product and all its compromises. I have high hopes, though.

        0 points
  • Niraj PatilNiraj Patil, over 4 years ago

    It took me playing around with Design Space to realize how incredibly slow PS is compared to Sketch. I still love Adobe. Their Device Preview is pretty quick, and their cloud features are very handy but if they can't improve application performance, I'll be sticking to Sketch for a while.

    8 points
    • Charles PearsonCharles Pearson, over 4 years ago

      Design Space is alpha. Its rough, its not full-featured yet, and yes, performance can and will be improved. Thanks for playing around with it though. :)

      4 points
    • Florian GrauFlorian Grau, over 4 years ago

      I love the idea of Design Space, but I'm not sure implementing it with web technology is a good idea. PS already feels weird and non-native (on a Mac at least), and Design Space tops that easily.

      I still dream of a Cocoa PS, but that's probably not gonna happen ...

      0 points
      • Nathan HueningNathan Huening, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

        I still dream of a Cocoa PS, but that's probably not gonna happen ...

        Correct. So long as Adobe wants to maintain versions for Windows and Mac, it'll never commit to using a native development environment for either one. Which means it will always be slower, laggier, and more alien than either one natively.

        1 point
  • Daniel MuiDaniel Mui, over 4 years ago

    Playing devil's advocate here:

    What you're after is a tool that is tailored (what I assume is) to UI design.

    Sure Adobe has only JUST released artboards and a handful of other useful tools. But when you look at What's New, you'll see that only around half of the new features are tailored to the UI/UX designer. The other new features solidifies Photoshop as a great tool thats more than just focused on UI designer. Sure a lot of people use and rely on it to create their Android, iOS, Windows apps, websites etc - but theres a A LOT more to it than just that.

    I think the Technology Preview like Design Space is a step in the direction of what you're after. They may take this Design Space concept, expand on it and release it as a separate app - who knows. In it's current form, yes I'll agree that it's a little clunky and could be enhanced (performance-wise) even more if thats possible.

    I just don't think it's right to get all fired up about Adobe, when they've brought more features into an already fat application - when theres SO much more to it than just the UI design component.

    5 points
    • Cristian MoiseiCristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

      Photoshop trying to be everyone's everything is exactly the problem. Would you disagree that it would be better if PS's core functions would be split into separate apps? I don't do UI work, image manipulation, video work, 3d work and whatever other shit is crammed up under the same roof frequently enough to not afford being bothered to launch a separate, specialised app that I can trust will do the thing I need well.

      5 points
      • Daniel MuiDaniel Mui, over 4 years ago

        I think Photoshop seems to have found itself snowballed into its unfortunate position of accommodating to everything - yes i'll agree to that. But it's been a progressional thing - Photoshop has been around for a very long time, and a lot has changed throughout that time. Much like a web designer now needing to know how to code - compared to web designers back in the day.

        Thats where tools like Sketch come in - they do a set range of things, and they do it to the best it can. (I say it like this, cause theres some bugs that bother crap out of me ha!)

        Also another thing is that Photoshop is just another cog (albeit an important one) in the massive machine called Adobe. They have many, MANY users, applications, systems and internal politics (I'm sure they do, like any massive company). But what I'm trying to say is - quick and BIG changes like extracting a set of functions and putting them into a separate app is never going to happen quickly. However theres hope as they seem to picking up the ball game and becoming a bit more agile and focused.

        1 point
        • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago

          Thats where tools like Sketch come in - they do a set range of things, and they do it to the best it can. (I say it like this, cause theres some bugs that bother crap out of me ha!)

          Fireworks already did almost everything people praise Sketch for… yet Adobe decided it was better off killing that and rolling Sketch features into Photoshop rather than rebuilding their own slim MVP for screen design from the ashes of Fireworks.

          8 points
          • Dragos Gavrila, over 4 years ago

            THIS!!!

            2 points
          • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, over 4 years ago

            I seriously don't get why Adobe did this.

            Fireworks could have been one of the best tools in the business if they had just put some effort into it.

            1 point
            • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago

              I seriously don't get why Adobe did this.

              Because they don't understand or even care about how their customers use their products.

              • Killing Fireworks and Freehand, cramming everything into Photoshop = Not understanding your customers
              • Outsourcing almost all development bar some of Photoshop and all of After Effects to India because it's cheap = Not caring about your customers
              1 point
            • Daniel FoscoDaniel Fosco, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

              Maybe because in their old business model, the more features they crammed in Photoshop, the more people would purchase new versions of it.

              We can agree that using Photoshop for UI design 5 years ago was much less crazy than doing it today — and a leaner app like Fireworks perhaps wouldn't bring as much interest back then as it would today.

              After they changed to Creative Cloud, it makes no fucking sense, though. I guess they are living with the consequences of their past decisions and now decided to just go with it.

              0 points
      • Connor Tomas O'BrienConnor Tomas O'Brien, over 4 years ago

        I think I probably would disagree. At a certain level, and in certain industries, there is a high degree of bleed between different kinds of work - especially for video production or complex image manipulation. When Adobe dismantles products into multiple apps, some functionality tends to be duplicated across them, which then introduces its own set of issues (i.e., look at Premiere, After Effects, and Speedgrade, and the ways in which all three of these products can be used, in different ways, for colour grading, or the ways in which certain functionality ends up moving between Premiere and AE in subsequent generations).

        The idea that applications are necessarily faster and more stable if their codebase is smaller isn't necessarily the case, especially if the alternative is moving files continuously across multiple separate applications, requiring intermediary tools (like Dynamic Link) to facilitate those transfers. Perhaps Sketch is a better tool for your workflow, and i think that's fine, but I'd imagine many PS users move across different kinds of functionality, and would much prefer to deal with a single interface for this instead of managing multiple smaller applications.

        2 points
        • Daniel FoscoDaniel Fosco, over 4 years ago

          While having two discrete applications running might be worse in terms of performance, I would love to see a workflow between apps that allowed for files and data to be seamlessly exchanged between them — specially in a field like film editing/colouring/authoring.

          If there's someone who could maybe pull this off, it would be Adobe, though I don't expect them to.

          0 points
  • Fabio Gervasoni, over 4 years ago

    Never really understand why Adobe decided to kill Fireworks...a more mature sketch snobbed by todays new breed of designers, but it was everything Sketch does today...

    3 points
    • Hmphry xHmphry x, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

      Maybe they just realized they actually hate former Macromedia Properties, and are actively fixing that 10 years after the buyout.

      0 points
  • Mahdi FarraMahdi Farra, over 4 years ago

    I honestly found the new update promising, specially the Design Space interface, it looks like an improved Sketch interface.

    I would've appreciate it more if it was a separate app though, It feels super weird that you have to go to a secret place in the app preferences to change the interface!

    But overall, I can see that Adobe is losing a huge portion of the market and that's pushing to finally realize that they have to listen carefully to what people actually needs.

    3 points
  • Mohsin NaqiMohsin Naqi, over 4 years ago

    I'd switch Sketch in a heartbeat if it was available on Windows.

    2 points
  • Andrea MontiniAndrea Montini, over 4 years ago

    You did right.

    2 points
  • Riho KrollRiho Kroll, over 4 years ago

    Making software is hard, guys. Especially if that software is older even than some designers in this community (including myself, actually). There are people at Adobe who are very interested in improving designers' workflows.

    Insulting said people for trying to help you is not the right way to approach this though. Some constructive and respectful criticism would go a long way.

    That being said, yes, Photoshop has become increasingly slower over time and is long due for a performance optimization. Especially when it comes to interface responsiveness.

    2 points
    • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago

      They're not "trying to help"me, I'm a customer and they provide a tool.

      when it comes to interface responsiveness

      Which they obviously don't care about at all or they Design Space UI wouldn't be coded in HTML...

      0 points
  • Patrick Haney, over 4 years ago

    Occasionally I have to use Photoshop to grab assets from a client's PSD file, and it always reminds me why I stopped using Photoshop a long time ago. Simple actions are unusually difficult to perform, heavily layered files slow my computer to a crawl, and the overall interface is a nightmare. Why anyone voluntarily uses Photoshop at this point is beyond me.

    I started using Sketch a year ago and switched over completely as my daily graphic design software about 6 months ago and couldn't be happier. As a web/mobile designer, it has everything I need, and it's designed to do what I need it to do quickly and easily. Before Sketch, I was using Fireworks, a product Adobe saw fit to acquire from Macromedia years ago and then slowly kill off, but not before charging customers for minor updates over the course of 3 or 4 years.

    Adobe doesn't give a crap about you, the designer. Some employees at this very large corporation might care, but the company doesn't. It's just the nature of the beast. And as long as Photoshop is the Swiss army knife of design software, it's going to be the decent at a lot of things but good at none.

    That said, if you like Photoshop, by all means go ahead and buy into the latest software updates. But don't be surprised if other people on your design/development team eventually start resenting you for sending them a PSD rather than a Sketch file or an EPS that can be imported into Sketch.

    2 points
    • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago

      Adobe doesn't give a crap about you, the designer. Some employees at this very large corporation might care, but the company doesn't.

      Sums it up completely, we begged them not to kill Freehand or to at least open source it… They couldn't care less.

      We begged them not to kill Fireworks, they couldn't care less seemed more just annoyed that we had the audacity not to be a good little CC user and stick with Photoshop to make their dev budget easier.

      The management is corrupt and creatively talentless. They seem a bunch born out of the Acrobat part of the company and only really endure the creative software side because it brings in money.

      Call me when an actual fucking artist who understands creative work and CARES about creative work is in charge of your awful diseased husk of a company. Until that day happens you'll never EVER see another dollar of mine.

      2 points
  • Bady QbBady Qb, over 4 years ago

    I heard Adobe will write their app so that it will be 8x faster in OSX El Capitan. Curious to see this implemented but I doubt we will see it soon

    1 point
    • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

      That's for rendering times in After Effects. Also, they have no timeframe for it so we're in for a wait.

      0 points
      • Bady QbBady Qb, over 4 years ago

        so it doesn't mean the other Adobe product will get 8x booster? that's a big boo then.

        0 points
        • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

          There's no actual statement from Adobe so we'll have to wait and see, but I wouldn't hope for significant improvements in PS anytime soon.

          0 points
    • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago

      No… Apple said Adobe worked Metal in for a test and saw some promising performance increases.

      The fact CC 2015 has just been released means you wont see those improvements until at least CC 2016 with no guarantee they'll ever ship at all.

      1 point
  • Andrew ConnAndrew Conn, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Just installed. Noticeably slower - irritatingly so. I'm on an iMac with an i7 and 32 gigs of RAM.

    *Edit: Should mention I'm letting PS use 70% of my RAM. Come on guys.

    1 point
    • Cristian MoiseiCristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

      I feel you.

      0 points
    • Lucian MarinLucian Marin, over 4 years ago

      Here’s a tip: don’t let PS go above 33% of RAM.

      0 points
      • Andrew ConnAndrew Conn, over 4 years ago

        Happy to try it, but could you explain the reasoning? When I tested PS last night with those settings I had no other applications running (normal background processes, of course). My thought was to give PS as many resources as possible to really see it fly.

        0 points
        • Lucian MarinLucian Marin, over 4 years ago

          It’s very simple. If you set PS to maximum it starts taking RAM from the system. If the system doesn’t have enough RAM, it starts swapping PS memory. The end result: PS acts like badly.

          Starting with Mavericks, OS X is using the entire RAM for everything: app caches, file caches, etc.

          0 points
      • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

        Why?

        0 points
  • Jon MyersJon Myers, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Soooo... Still have not been able to update to at least check it out.

    For the 3rd Fn time, the Creative Cloud installer has become corrupted.

    And, downloading the "Creative Cloud Cleaner" - doesn't do jack.

    I can't think of any other software I use, which has this crap hack of a piece of software a "Cleaner" to address their bloat, and even that - still fails.....

    The last time this happened, I had to spend 30 minutes on a call with a guy who didn't have a solid command of English, who was simply reading from prompts.

    The day is close when I will be able to detach myself from the Adobe ecosystem.

    Adobe gives me the same feeling banks and telecoms give me.

    Contempt.

    I regrettably hand over my money and view those institutions with contempt.

    Where in contrast, there are companies I actually get delight in handing my money over to.

    I see my credit card get dinged by Spotify and I actually feel a bit happy. I really enjoy the service, they get the customer and it's a good value.

    When the Dropbox charge appears, I rationalize it. I find it valuable.

    And I happily handed over my money to the people at Sketch and I happily hand my money over to the folks at Invision every month for one simple reason.

    They GET designers.

    They listen to the customer.

    When the Adobe charge appears in my inbox, I feel a tinge of hatred and contempt. As a customer, one feels trapped and damned if you do, damned if you don't.

    If this thread demonstrates anything, one could easily surmise that Adobe is out of touch with their audience(s) across the board. The company is stabbing at all angles and hitting none.

    If I were an Adobe shareholder reading this thread, I would dump them and run for the hills.

    1 point
  • Mihai SerbanMihai Serban, over 4 years ago

    While we are at it, did anybody completely replaced Photoshop/Illustrator with Affinity Designer? Seems pretty powerful but I didn't try it yet.

    https://affinity.serif.com/en-us/

    1 point
    • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

      You can get a 30 day trial of it or buy it relatively cheap. I think it's good but it is in no way revolutionary or better than PS or AI - I haven't found a single impressive feature and the layout looks is more or less the same as what adobe has.

      1 point
    • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

      Actually, something I did not know is that Affinity can import PSD files, meaning you could transition quite easily. It's only £29 now, I'll have to look into it some more.

      1 point
  • Eduardo NunesEduardo Nunes, over 4 years ago

    Played around with it for a while and the most frustrating change for me so far is the new export workflow — so much worse than the traditional (and, apparently, now legacy) "Save for Web".

    0 points
    • Drew AlbinsonDrew Albinson, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

      Just use Ctrl/Cmd+Shft+Alt+S

      I've been doing it all morning and didn't realize they had hidden this feature. Shortcuts, baby!

      0 points
      • Eduardo NunesEduardo Nunes, over 4 years ago

        Yes, I've always used that shortcurt, and continue to do so. But if you go through File > Export, you'll see it now says "(legacy)", meaning it's likely they'll remove it from future versions altogether...

        0 points
    • cliff nowickicliff nowicki, over 4 years ago

      I didn't realize they switched it either until I read this. The hot keys still work, its how I make my workflow so much faster and easier.

      0 points
  • ja krish, over 4 years ago

    Fireworks + handful extension keeps my UX works simple. It is the place where Ctrl+Z is still used to undo actions.

    0 points
    • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

      You can easily change that in the Edit Shortcuts menu if it's a concern. The logic was to let people doing image manipulation compare before and after quickly.

      0 points
  • James HarrisJames Harris, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Design Space Preview is "only available for Mac OS X 10.10 and Windows 8.1 64-bit and higher." :(

    0 points
  • Tori ZTori Z, over 4 years ago

    Complaining is useless I think... I instantly switched to Sketch back in second year when I tried it out.

    That being said, to have Sketch keep evolving, I'd love to see Photoshop getting better and better. As a customer the more competitive for them the better for us :P

    Again, why Adobe shut down Fireworks? That could be a strong competitor for Sketch.

    0 points
  • Jignesh LadJignesh Lad, over 4 years ago

    I am currently using the updated version of Adobe CC 2015 and I feel that my MacBook Pro can handle the update really well.

    Maybe there are minor points regarding making the software bloated but personally I find the process of going in between Photoshop and Illustrator really easy.

    I think this does come down to ones confidence of using the tool and what makes it easy for them. Yeah we all moan about Adobe and how crap they are with their updates, bugs and tendency to lag. But these updates have made it easier for me and maybe other designers to work quicker in Photoshop.

    Sketch does one medium only and does it well, for me Adobe allows me to work across many mediums.

    Its all down to designer preference, then again I will moan about PS in the morning but no software is perfect.

    0 points
  • Bruno MarinhoBruno Marinho, over 4 years ago

    That's why I'm still with CC or 2013 version.

    0 points
  • Samantha S, over 4 years ago

    For someone who has been exclusively working out of Axure RP and Omnigraffle pro and CS6 in a locked down, regulated corporate setting (no cloud software), what am I missing out on by not having Sketch? Maybe I'll install it on my personal machine, thanks.

    0 points
    • Cristian Moisei, over 4 years ago

      Speed is what you're missing on. Sketch was designed using modern, native libraries and it doesn't come with all the stuff PS has (3D, video editing, 90s style shape styles and filters, some print stuff, some painting stuff) - it's just for UI and it feels like a breath of fresh air to use it.

      The lack of a windows version and low market share means it's not that easy to use for professional projects and it does have its share of bugs and problems, but it's damn fast and easy to work with.

      You should try it when you have the time.

      1 point
  • David AlandíDavid Alandí, over 4 years ago

    lol

    0 points
  • Andrew ConnAndrew Conn, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

    Could someone please do a Kickstarter to buy Fireworks from Adobe and make it awesome/supported again?

    *Edit: Spelling.

    0 points
    • Jon MyersJon Myers, over 4 years ago (edited over 4 years ago )

      Yes...

      I was a Fireworks user for years and years. Loved it. Put up with its quirks and had hope.

      To see that product writhe and do the death rattle on hospice inside the Adobe Death Machine is a damn unnecessary shame.

      Sad to say, at this point, my work flow is so heavily optimized for Sketch and the Sketch ecosystem that has sprung up (plugins, Invision, Zepelin, etc.,) - that I don't think I could go back to Fireworks.

      0 points
    • Fabio Gervasoni, over 4 years ago

      seriously...let's do it!

      0 points
    • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago

      I don't think they're even interested in selling it. There were attempts, even getting lawyers involved to try and get them to open source Freehand and they just didn't care.

      Several thousand signed petitions to open source Fireworks and they presumably just looked at the number and scoffed that they better not because thats a few thousand potentially lost CC subscribers.

      Adobe doesn't care about you or the creative work their abandoned tools enabled. All they care about is that they get $600 a year and have to pay as few US based engineers as possible and farm out as much as they can to India as possible.

      0 points
  • Mike MaiMike Mai, over 4 years ago

    Using Photoshop for web design is like using Photoshop to lay out an entire book. It's just the wrong tool. If you are doing that, you fail as a designer.

    Adobe hasn't made anything great in recent years, but they aren't so terrible. Instead of trying to "fix" Photoshop, they should focus on their Edge line-up, which is solely intended for web design.

    Us, as designers, instead of forcing Adobe to make Photoshop into something other than its intended purpose, we should analyze what's the right tool for web design and start using it. Stop your whining.

    0 points
  • Kevin WhiteKevin White, over 4 years ago

    Hits this point hard: "Are art-boards a good idea? Sure. Just imagine how it will all work when making a few of them in a raster graphics editor. Hell, make two blank ones and see how even scrolling becomes laggy" Noticable right away

    0 points