8 comments

  • Michael GreenMichael Green, almost 5 years ago

    Great post.

    I'm interested in the title "consultant" that you use. What exactly does that entail and how do you get people to hire you.

    I could see how you get work as a designer because the client knows their needs. But I'm interested as to how you get consulting gigs. I'd love to get int that business.

    1 point
    • Anton Sten, almost 5 years ago

      Thanks Michael.

      I'm going to copy-paste Brendan Dunn's answer to the difference between a freelancer and a consultant:

      "“What’s the difference between a freelancer and a consultant?” I’ve never really had a good answer for this. I mean, I knew that consultants played a more active role in the business behind the project. I always thought of the distinction a bit like the difference between a chef and a cook; the former directs, combines, and creates, while the latter just follows recipes."

      I think it's a great answer because it doesn't say that one's more important than the other, projects might require both (or none). But it's rare that I take on projects where I just 'design' without having sessions to completely understand the business goals that drive the company and the specific project.

      I think consultant is something that comes with experience (and that I also have a business degree so it's natural for me to want to understand that part as well). If the client knows their needs, a freelancer is great. In many cases however, they don't know their (actual) needs. That's when they need a consultant.

      Makes sense?

      0 points
      • Michael GreenMichael Green, almost 5 years ago

        Great answer! Thanks so much.

        There are so many "freelancers" out there and I assume that most companies seek out just that because they THINK they know their needs.

        How many clients have specifically sought you out as a consultant?

        0 points
        • Anton Sten, almost 5 years ago

          I would say that 1/3 no nothing at all what they want, 1/3 have a slight idea and 1/3 are pretty sure of what they want (and out of those, about 1/2 are right!)

          0 points
  • Tim WilliamsTim Williams, almost 5 years ago

    I'm interested how paid vacation works as a freelancer in Sweden.

    0 points
    • Anton Sten, almost 5 years ago

      Fair point @Tim. Obviously in the end, it's you (the company) that pays for that vacation. It was more related to taking a full time job in the States (2 weeks vacation) vs. freelance.

      The benefit of Sweden of course is that no one thinks it's strange if you decide to take 4-5 weeks off during the summer, it's more or less assumed you will.

      0 points