13 comments

  • , over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    This:

    “Our love for the digital interface is out of control”

    3 points
  • Yitong ZhangYitong Zhang, over 7 years ago

    For anyone interested, Bret Victor wrote a fantastic treatise on this subject. In it, he makes the distinction between manipulation software (photoshop) and information software (weather) and how the latter need as little interaction as possible.

    http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/

    2 points
  • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, over 7 years ago

    I don’t really like the example. Sure, the BMW remote app might be a lot of steps, but unlocking a Tesla isn’t (you walk up to the car and open the door with the key on you). Tesla also has an app, for when you’re not near your car. Different purposes. I wouldn’t blame the app, because the different workflows are for different scenarios.

    I will watch the talk though. :)

    1 point
  • Miguel Solorio, over 7 years ago

    There's also a video version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAr-ChaMzmI

    1 point
  • Robin RaszkaRobin Raszka, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    And yet, he works at Samsung.

    0 points
  • Atrin Assa, over 7 years ago

    I highly recommend the book. I think the over-interfacing issue is reflective of the strange human desire for more more more! If you hire someone to design an interface and user experience and they come back with "Well, actually, I got rid of the interface," you're gonna be less pleased than you would be with someone who comes up with some clever contraption that inadvertently complicates the interaction.

    That's because you pay someone for a new solution...not to take things away. As long as that mindset remains, there will be a proliferation of "an app for that!"

    0 points
  • Taron GhazaryanTaron Ghazaryan, over 7 years ago

    Golden Krishna gave this talk at Designers and Geeks last night at the Yelp office. It is by far one of my favorite D+G talks. Interfaces aren't going anywhere anytime soon, but lots of products and services seem to rely on them when they don't need to. The unlocking example being one of them. Wouldn't it be great if computers just knew who you are based on all of the sensors you already carry?

    0 points
    • , over 7 years ago

      Totally right Taron! I love design and UI but I feel very overwhelmed – in a bad way – to where things are heading to. I guess some of the wearables would try to solve this problem regarding sensors. I worked three months with iBeacons and I must admit that I felt very frustrated. The whole concept is great but the technology isn't there yet.

      0 points
      • joe andersonjoe anderson, over 7 years ago

        What was frustrating about working with iBeacons? Any insights you can share?

        1 point
        • , over 7 years ago

          Hey Joe,

          I tried to build a simple demo using 6 beacons in the office to send specific push notifications when you arrive and leave the office. It was a painful experience. We had about 6 users (iPhone) and I remember only 2 of us got the notifications at the right time and accuracy. The rest of us got it very randomically. I tried to use three different SDK's and supplies/hardware. I couldn't build something reliable. Initially I thought it was from my side only but then talking with some retails I realised they share the same issues.

          (It was a R&D project, sorry if I can be more specific)

          0 points
          • joe andersonjoe anderson, over 7 years ago

            Yikes, that sounds really painful. Were you able to get anything that was repeatable at all but guaranteed?

            Have you tried out Estimote?

            0 points
  • Benjamin GageBenjamin Gage, over 7 years ago

    Great read. Added to my Amazon Wishlist!

    0 points