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People Hate Green Bubbles (medium.com)

over 5 years ago from , Technical Project Manager @ Complex / Former Head of Product & Design @ Spirited Media

25 comments

  • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, over 5 years ago

    "passive-aggressive product design" pretty much sums up apple's software strategy.

    14 points
    • Patrick SmithPatrick Smith, over 5 years ago

      I flinch at some of the lame digs at Apple Keynotes and find this sort of thing sad, but from what I’ve noticed Google is aggressive too. Microsoft is possibly the most pleasant one now.

      0 points
  • Artem TitoulenkoArtem Titoulenko, over 5 years ago

    The article kinda took a strange turn with defining "Product Manager", and loosely tied that into it's original premise. Then it went on some weak, disconnected tangents and arrived at what seems to be a meek attempt at "solving the problem," and a disapproving jab at Apple.

    This is unfortunate since Paul's writing is usually spot on :(

    9 points
  • Weston VierreggerWeston Vierregger, over 5 years ago

    On Android, everyone's bubbles can be blue. :)

    What a world!

    5 points
  • Mike LMike L, over 5 years ago

    Is this person opposed to using different colors, or do they just have an issue with the SHADE of green and are therefore assigning terrible motives?

    The latter is baseless. As to the former, how else should Apple indicate to users what's an iMessage and what's an SMS? Or are they arguing that's not useful for their users to know at all?

    I don't like assuming the worst in people, without evidence. And that's what this writer is doing.

    4 points
    • Michael AleoMichael Aleo, over 5 years ago

      I don't think it has to do with the actual color, I think it has everything to do with people being judgemental and inclusive, even if it's subconscious.

      4 points
    • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

      I don't like assuming the worst in people, without evidence. And that's what this writer is doing.

      there is evidence. as referenced in the article, the marketing copy on Apple's site was cleverly written to incite this feeling.

      official site

      source

      7 points
      • wojtek w.wojtek w., over 5 years ago

        Oh god, this is actually real...

        1 point
      • Mike LMike L, over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

        All that says is that it's a different color in order to let you know that if it's blue: it's free, that it's sent to other devices, and that it'll tell you when they've actually received it.

        That's useful info. How anybody could read that as inciting negative feelings I really don't understand. The "green with envy" line was just saying that feature-wise, iMessage is better than SMS -- not saying that people using SMS are inferior in some way. Is that really not obvious?

        1 point
        • Patrick SmithPatrick Smith, over 5 years ago

          All the ways the blue bubbles are superior is also a list of how the green bubbles are inferior. It’s letting people draw their own conclusion without stating it outright that ‘green bubbles are inferior’.

          1 point
          • Mike LMike L, over 5 years ago

            Wait, so the argument now isn't about colors but saying that Apple shouldn't advertise the benefits of features like iMessage? Because just by defining the benefits of features they're being mean?

            0 points
    • Laurens SpangenbergLaurens Spangenberg, over 5 years ago

      I'm pretty sure it's just that shade. The shade apple used looks like snot (literally.) Google Hangouts uses green but it's a pleasant shade.

      0 points
  • Hawke BassignaniHawke Bassignani, over 5 years ago

    If I squint my eyes, it was a thoughtful read that I will look back on fondly.

    If I open them all the way, I am just confused because it jumped all over the place trying to make an otherwise uncomplicated point.

    Fun way to pass a few minutes, either way.

    3 points
  • wojtek w.wojtek w., over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

    dumb twitter bullshit

    Probably the dumbest thing I've read this year so far. Very good source to base an article on.

    2 points
    • Michael AleoMichael Aleo, over 5 years ago

      Eh, I disagree with you a bit. It's an interesting look into the way some generic users feel. Not a scientific, concrete study—but it's interesting nonetheless that people feel this way.

      3 points
      • wojtek w.wojtek w., over 5 years ago

        But there is no why, no explanation to it. Just this out of context statement that sounds astonishingly stupid.

        1 point
        • Axel ValdezAxel Valdez, over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

          Read the article. He's talking about how no matter when you search twitter for "Green Bubbles" the result consists of people saying they hate 'em.

          A few months ago my friend Edd Dumbill shared a discovery. He pointed out that if you search Twitter for the words “green bubbles” you’ll find very consistent results. People hate green bubbles. Example:

          The tweet is there as an illustration of what he just said, and it's not just that one, there are two more of them (and a lot of you do the search yourself).

          I think it is important and interesting that, even if Apple just made the color distinction as a way to inform the user in a subtle way, the result is people using the info to hate or mistreat others. It is interesting as UI, UX, even anthropology, as we are defining who and what we are by the smartphone we own. Even the author marks his territory at the end saying he won't leave Android.

          3 points
    • Chris SlowikChris Slowik, over 5 years ago

      It's so awful, but I stop trusting a person once they show they're too lazy to use real words.

      1 point
  • Edwin de JonghEdwin de Jongh, over 5 years ago

    Just use Whatsapp, people...

    1 point
  • Luís SilvaLuís Silva, over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

    IMO it's not about the color and the author is confusing a side effect with the problem. If iMessages was green and SMS was blue you'd be seeing the exact opposite, although the current choice might amplify the feeling.

    Of course I prefer to use a modern service where I get delivery reports, can easily send multimedia and "don't pay" for each message sent. On top of that, I'm talking to someone that is in my "private" club and to which I can somehow relate.

    1 point
  • Patrick SmithPatrick Smith, over 5 years ago

    What’s weird is that the Messages app icon is still green after iOS 7, whereas before the UI colour scheme use to match the icon.

    I think the green bubbles have less contrast to the blue ones — I find they are more irritating to read.

    1 point
  • cliff nowickicliff nowicki, over 5 years ago

    After reading who was tweeting about their hatred over green bubbles, I'd be happy if they decided not to talk to me. I still find it very funny that people are REALLY disgusted by green bubbles on their iphone.

    0 points
  • Mike M, over 5 years ago

    I don't hate green bubbles but I still think it's brilliant strategy.

    0 points