14 comments

  • Andrea MazziniAndrea Mazzini, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

    I really appreciate Evan's work, but I'm having an hard time understanding the use of the floating button, so dear to Material. "Since we hidden all the features in a drawer, here's a coloured blob over your content.". It's (arguably) easier to reach, but is it really a better use of the (now humongous) screen estate?

    3 points
    • Evan Dinsmore, almost 5 years ago

      Dropbox's team work? Just to clarify this was an unsolicited redesign, just for fun and personal exploration.

      Regarding Material, have you used it on an Android phone? I think the nav drawer works because all of Google's apps use it, and nearly all other third-party apps will as well. As long as the user knows it's there, it won't cause any problems (as it does on iOS for engagement). Same goes for the floating action button. On its own in a single app, it might not make that much sense, but if many apps on the same platform use the button consistently to surface the main actions, the consistency will allow users to know exactly how to use your app, and what's important, within seconds of opening it for the first time. That said, a FAB doesn't need to be used all the time. In this case, because of the left-aligned titles, the button doesn't obscure any content, but there are cases where it might make sense to keep the primary action in the app bar instead to keep the content visible. :)

      0 points
      • Andrea MazziniAndrea Mazzini, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

        Sorry, brain fart on my part, I'll edit the first part of the comment :)

        The main problem with the drawer for me is the increasing screen size of the devices, swiping from one edge or reaching for the hamburger button is starting to feel clunky at best. I fell into the "everything needs to be a side menu" tunnel in the past though, so much that I wrote an iOS library when there were none available. :) Now I have to say that I feel on the same page with Apple regarding the matter.

        0 points
        • Evan Dinsmore, almost 5 years ago

          I agree that, especially for people with larger phones and smaller hands (or an unfortunate combination of the two), nav drawers can be a hassle. But, given that most primary actions on iOS are located in the nav bar, I don't think that's Apple's primary concern. Tab bars definitely increase engagement, particularly on iOS where there is no officially supported nav drawer library. However, tabs have a distinctly different usage on Android, and as a designer it's important to respect the platform and try to implement things in a way that are familiar and expected to the user.

          Personally, I think both Google's Material and Apple's HIG have their own set of pros and cons, and most apps will probably need a different approach for each to make the best of the design patterns.

          0 points
          • Andrea MazziniAndrea Mazzini, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

            I couldn't agree more on the respect of the system's patterns, just to be clear, mine was just a general consideration on Material Design. It's true that most actions on iOS are placed in the nav bar, but there's also the handy double tap on the home button that brings everything down. It's a lazy solution though, both Apple's HIG and Google's MD should start tackling an issue that is becoming apparent with the constant increase of screen sizes.

            1 point
            • Evan DinsmoreEvan Dinsmore, almost 5 years ago

              Agreed on all accounts, the double-tap home button seems like a hack. Android at least has on-screen buttons for navigation between apps, and back through the current app, and I suspect that the FAB was meant for this purpose as well. But screen size (and resolution) handling are weaknesses for both companies right now.

              0 points
            • Adam Brace, almost 5 years ago

              I totally agree with that, I feel like these principals have been inherited on the web and as phone sizes continue to get bigger its an issue that should be corrected

              0 points
  • Wojciech Zalot, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

    As much as I hate redesign ideas/projects on Behance, this ones finally looks different and well thought instead of just "flating" existing design and putting to Behance...

    Good job, looking forward to read about your next redesigns ;-)

    2 points
    • Evan Dinsmore, almost 5 years ago

      Thanks :) I must admit I'm generally not a fan of redesigns either, but I think it's hard to deny the creative benefit to producing more work and thinking about different projects, and my goal is to approach them thoughtfully, without simply making aesthetic changes. Appreciate it!

      1 point
  • Pete LadaPete Lada, almost 5 years ago

    Nice, Evan. Well thought out!

    1 point
  • Brad McNallyBrad McNally, almost 5 years ago

    This is a really well thought out design exploration. Thanks!

    1 point
  • Raphael LoderRaphael Loder, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

    Absolutely love it. I'm currently in the process of finishing my thesis in which I'm redesigning an Android app with the Material Design Guidelines as well (http://bit.ly/1xpGQSf). And I think can totally relate in most of your decisions and struggles.

    I actually went against the guidelines in the case of my nav drawer in 2 cases: 1. Selection state (without the darker selection state in the back, only color coding the title and icon) 2. I pinned the lower menu items like Settings and Help & Feedback at the bottom. It felt more seperated and more structured, as they are conventional items and basically independent of the app.

    And I decided to have some fun and show how eagerly Google is following their own guidelines up to this point ;) http://i.imgur.com/DF0rD91.jpg

    Would love to chat more about this, but I just don't have the time right now ;)

    I'm looking forward to your next articles!

    0 points
    • Evan DinsmoreEvan Dinsmore, almost 5 years ago

      Heh, yeah, there are still some inconsistencies with Google's own implementation of the guidelines. That could be because the apps were being developed side-by-side before the guidelines were even complete.

      That being said, they're guidelines, not rules. I find myself using different table cell sizes and typography very often, depending on the use-case. Knowing which guidelines to break from and when is the key to fitting in with the design system but still keeping your own branding in tact.

      Glad you enjoyed it!

      1 point
  • Erik Friberg, almost 5 years ago (edited almost 5 years ago )

    Very interesting stuff! It's actually something that is very likely to happen for dropbox soon! So it's a bit like reading the "making of" from the dropbox team itself. Good work!

    0 points